'nature'에 해당되는 글 19건

  1. 2018.09.20 This Image of the Total Eclipse Is Being Called “History’s Most Amazing Photo” 역사상 가장 놀랄만한 개기식 사진들
  2. 2018.09.01 Traveling Photographer Captures the Beautiful Unspoiled Landscape of Kyrgyzstan 키르기스스탄의 천혜의 경관
  3. 2018.07.21 Incredible Photos Capture Powerful Lightning Storms Over Volcano Eruptions 경이롭기까지 한 화산분화 번개폭풍 찰라 사진
  4. 2018.07.12 VIDEO; Fisherman Catches Beautifully Rare “Cotton Candy” Lobster in Canada 매우 드문 아름다운 코튼색깔의 바닷 가재
  5. 2018.07.07 Incredible Winners of the 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest
  6. 2018.06.30 Stunning Aerial Photos Offer a Unique Perspective of Venice 공중에서 본 찬탄할 베니스
  7. 2018.06.16 Clever Street Artist Transforms Ordinary Public Places Into Funny Installations 스트리트 아티스트, 평범한 길거리를 유머틱한 환경으로 변신시켜
  8. 2018.06.16 Powerful Waves Crashing With the Force of Mythical Gods and Sea Creatures 신의 힘을 보여주는 강력한 파도의 부서짐
  9. 2018.06.08 Mini Trucks in Japan Are Being Transformed Into Enchanting Tiny Gardens 일본의 미니 케이 트럭, 정원으로 변신하다
  10. 2018.06.05 Photographer Captures the Mystifying Moods of Mount Fuji at Dawn 신비의 후지산 석양
  11. 2018.05.26 Early Highlights of the 2018 Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2018 코믹 야생동물 사진 콘테스트
  12. 2018.05.25 Stunning Photos Capture the Dreamy “Heaven on Earth” Landscapes of Patagonia 비엔나 출신의 소프트웨어 엔지니어 루카스 푸르란의 파타고니아 경관 작품
  13. 2018.05.24 VIDEO:Gorgeous Infinity Pool on Vietnamese Mountain Looks Like It’s Sitting on Clouds 호앙 리엔 국립공원 토파스이콜로지
  14. 2018.05.16 Interview: Floral Installations Transform Gallery Spaces Into Immersive Indoor Gardens
  15. 2018.04.28 VIDEO: Glacier calving
  16. 2018.04.26 World’s First Underwater Villa Offers Spectacular Living 16 Feet Below the Sea 세계 최초 해저 빌라
  17. 2018.04.14 Spectacular Photos Capture Frozen Beauty of Largest Freshwater Lake in the World
  18. 2018.04.07 Traveling Photographer Captures Light Dancing Across Majestic Landscapes
  19. 2018.04.01 Glass-Walled Cabin in Iceland Lets You Gaze at the Northern Lights Right From Bed 아이스란드의 파노라마 유리벽 민박집
Nature2018.09.20 00:27


This Image of the Total Eclipse Is Being Called “History’s Most Amazing Photo”


By Jessica Stewart on September 14, 2018


Over 200 million Americans watched the total solar eclipse in August 2017, but no one had a better view than photographer Jon Carmichael. He spent years plotting how he could capture the total eclipse in a unique way, eventually combining his passions for photography, astronomy, and flight.


 

Total Eclipse Photo by Jon Carmichael


 

역사상 가장 놀랄만한 개기식 사진들


2017년 8월 2억 명이 넘는 미국인들이 일식을 지켜봤지만 사진작가 존 카마이클보다 더 나은 시각을 가진 사람은 없었다. 그는 자신이 어떻게 일식을 독특한 방법으로 포착할 수 있는지, 결국 사진, 천문학, 비행에 대한 열정을 결합시킬 수 있는지를 계획하면서 수년을 보냈다.


"만약 내가 충분히 높이 올라간다면, 달의 그림자가 지구 표면을 가로질러 2,000mph로 움직이는 것을 실제로 볼 수 있을까? 그것이 내가 정말 보고 싶었던 것이다."라고 카마이클이 나의 모던 메이트에게 말한다. 사진작가로서, 저는 정말 이 아름다운 순간을 독특한 관점에서 포착할 수 있을까 생각했습니다. 이는 역사상 가장 사진 찍힌 순간이었기 때문에 전문 사진작가로서 많은 압박감을 받고 있습니다." 일식 경로를 주의 깊게 연구함으로써, 이 사진작가는 사우스웨스트 항공이 포틀랜드에서 세인트 루이스까지 비행하는 것을 발견했고, 이 비행은 이 행사를 보기 위한 완벽한 위치에 놓이게 될 것이다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator

edited by kcontents


“I wondered, if I got up high enough, could I actually see the moon's shadow move across the Earth's surface at 2,000 mph? That's what I really wanted to see,” Carmichael tells My Modern Met. “And as a photographer, I wondered, can I actually capture this beautiful fleeting moment in our country from a unique perspective? This was the most photographed moment in history, so as a professional photographer that's a lot of pressure.” By studying the eclipse path carefully, the photographer realized that Southwest Airlines runs a flight from Portland to St. Louis that would put him in the perfect position to view the event.



Taking a once in a lifetime chance, Carmichael purchased a ticket and hoped that he'd get a window seat. Since Southwest doesn't have pre-assigned seats, he'd even prepared himself to bribe someone to give up their window position if necessary. Luckily, it didn't come to that. When he explained his mission to the Southwest flight crew, not only did they ensure he'd get a great seat, but the captain actually went outside the plane to clean the window for a crystal clear shot. During the flight itself, the pilots circled a few times to provide all passengers with a spectacular view.


When it came time for the moment of totality, Carmichael was ready. He shot over 1,200 photos in two minutes and managed to perfectly capture the total eclipse over Snake River. It's an image that Inc. calls “history's most amazing photo.” A 10-foot laser-crystal c-print of 108 now hangs in Twitter's New York offices.


So how did it feel to take the photo of his dreams? “In photography, it's very rare for something you envision to manifest itself, let alone to turn out even better than you had hoped. I had visualized this moment for years, risked a lot flying across the country on the off-chance this could work out, and hadn't slept in days leading up to this moment. So after I looked through all the photographs, I put my camera away, took a deep breath, and celebrated by ordering a drink and had a giant smile for the rest of the flight. I had never felt more relieved, grateful, and excited in my life. Against all odds, it came together. It felt meant to be—and literally changed my life.”


Carmichael spent one year processing the images into a giant photographic-mosaic titled 108. Limited edition prints are now available for purchase via the photographer's website.


Photographer Jon Carmichael took a Southwest flight during the Great American Eclipse to get the perfect photo from his seat.

Jon Carmichael - Behind the Scenes of Total Eclipse Photo

Once he explained his mission to the flight crew, the captain cleaned his window to ensure he'd have a crystal clear shot.

Jon Carmichael - Behind the Scenes of Total Eclipse Photo

From his window seat, Carmichael had the perfect view and was able to take 1,200 photos during the eclipse.


Jon Carmichael - Behind the Scenes of Total Eclipse Photo


Watch this video from Southwest Airlines to learn more about Carmichael's vision.

Jon Carmichael: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Jon Carmichael.

kcontents


Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.09.01 01:18


Traveling Photographer Captures the Beautiful Unspoiled Landscape of Kyrgyzstan

By Jessica Stewart on August 28, 2018



 

키르기스스탄의 천혜의 경관 


숙련된 풍경 사진작가로서, 알버트 드로스는 많은 놀라운 풍경을 보아왔지만, 키르기스스탄 3주간의 여행 동안 그가 발견한 것은 경탄 그 자체였다.


육지로 둘러싸인 중앙아시아 국가는 고대 실크로드에 위치하고 있으며, 경관에 엄청난 다양성을 가지고 있다. 톈산까지의 산간지역은 국토의 80%를 차지하고 있는 반면 키르기스스탄은 빛 공해의 영향을 받지 않는 맑은 하늘뿐 아니라 인상적인 계곡과 바닥으로 가득 차 있다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator



Wild horses standing in front of the huge snow capped peaks in the Sary-Jaz valley on the border of Kyrgyzstan and China.




As a skilled landscape photographer, Albert Dros has seen a lot of stunning landscapes, but nothing prepared him for the beauty he would find during a 3-week trip to Kyrgyzstan. The landlocked Central Asian country, located along the ancient Silk Road, has an incredible variety to its landscape. While the mountainous region to Tian Shan covers 80% of the country, Kyrgyzstan is also filled with impressive valleys and basins, as well as a clear sky untouched by light pollution.


For Dros, Kyrgyzstan was paradise. “As a photographer and nature lover, you know that feeling when you see that untouched beauty? Crazy mountains with open valleys? It triggers you somehow. That’s what Kyrgyzstan did to me,” Dros writes. The unspoiled landscape makes for sweeping views, with the occasional yurt or group of wild horses entering the frame. Though the mountains are already visible when in the capital city of Bishkek, the real adventure begins when Dros explores regions inhabited by nomadic shepherds.


“With some effort (driving ‘bad’ roads and hiking steep paths) you’ll be able to see some of the most beautiful untouched nature you’ve ever seen. Endless valleys with huge mountains around you, crystal clear turquoise lakes, wild eagles, canyons, you name it. This country has it all. I was surprised by its variety of landscapes in a rather small area. Just a few hours driving would bring me from snowcapped mountains to landscapes that looked like the moon with red canyons and unearthly textures.”


Dros was able to employ all his landscape photography secrets and capture the unspoiled beauty of a country few tourists venture to see. The results are a moving tribute to the power to nature.




Landscape photographer Albert Dros spent three weeks photographing the unspoiled beauty of Kyrgyzstan.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

A green valley with wild horses and a view on Peak Yeltsin. This is what Kyrgyzstan is about.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

An intimate shot of a green hill. Kyrgyzstan has many opportunities for intimate shots as it has beautiful rocks and hills everywhere around.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

A wide open valley with glacial rivers coming from the mountains protecting the valley. These mountains are often 5000m+ (16400ft+). This is a shot of the Barskoon Valley. It took a 4000m (13000ft) road pass to get here.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

Twilight before the sun comes up. Standing at one of the crazy canyons in Kyrgyzstan that look like they’re coming straight from the moon.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

Ala-Kul lake, a magical crystal clear lake turquoise-colored lake located at an altitude close to 4000m. This lake requires a steep 5 hour hike at high altitudes to get to.

Photo of Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

These kind of scenes are common yet impressive to see in Kyrgyzstan. Hundreds of animals covering the empty lands.

Kyrgyzstan Landscape Photography by Albert Dros

An aerial panorama of a part of the Barksoon Valley. You can see all the rivers coming from the glaciers of the mountains into lakes. This valley itself is already at 4000m (13000ft) with the surrounding mountains much higher.

Photo of Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

An eagle flying over the tops of the Ala-Archa mountains. Unique light hitting inside of the mountain from reflecting onto the clouds.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

Camping at the Sary-Jaz valley on the border of Kyrgyzstan and China. Zero light pollution makes the skies so bright. We used this old Soviet bus as transport. Not much comfort but very reliable, they said. This thing could drive off road up to mountains. It was called ‘the pill’ as according to the locals it looked like a pill.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

You can always find different wildflowers in the mountains in Kyrgyzstan. This was at an altitude of 4000m (13000ft) in the Barskoon Valley. Glaciers, lakes, and mountains everywhere around.

The Tian Shan mountain range covers 80% of the country, with peaks reaching over 7000 meters (23,000 feet).

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

Standing in front just another Glacier at the Sary Jaz Valley which is located on the border of Kyrgyzstan and China. This area requires a permit. It’s an amazing valley surrounded by snowcapped mountains of the Tian Shan range which has peaks over 7000m (23000ft).

Photo of Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

Standing in front of Peak Karakol. A very scenic peak popular among mountain climbers. It has an altitude of 5200m (17000ft).

Photo of Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

You’ll find this kind of landscapes next to a lot of roads. Like they’re carefully carved out of mountains. Interesting hills against blue skies form a beautiful sight.

Kyrgyzstan Landscape Photography by Albert Dros

A top down view from the patterns of Skazka Canyon (fairy tale canyon).

Kyrgyzstan Landscape Photography by Albert Dros

A photo of the lunar eclipse in 2018 with Mars right under it and the visible milky way. Notice my girlfriend standing there enjoying the night sky.

Kyrgyzstan Landscape Photography by Albert Dros

Sunrise at Skazka canyon, which means fairy tale canyon. Does this remind you of Mars?

Many people are shepherds living a nomadic lifestyle, with families living in yurts.

Kyrgyzstan Photo by Albert Dros

A kid of the local family enjoying the sunset at Song-Kul, a wide open valley at a huge lake at an altitude of 3000m (9800ft). The locals are living like nomads here without any luxury. Think about growing up here.

Photo of Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

Hundreds of sheep moved on the hills right before a storm hit.

Yurt in Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

Kids standing in the opening of their Yurt. They stay here in the summer months learning to take care of the cattle from when they’re young.

Kyrgyzstan Photo by Albert Dros

Mars-like landscapes in a canyon called Skazka Canyon which means ‘fairytale canyon’. Walking around here is really unreal.

Kyrgyzstan Landscape Photography by Albert Dros

An open view of the scenic Karakol Peak which lies at the end of Karakol Valley. You can see how the glacier mounts into streams and rivers. An impressive sight.

Kyrgyzstan Landscape Photography by Albert Dros

A horse with a mountain backdrop in the Song-Kul area. Look closely and you can see lots of animals and yurts in the background.

Photo of Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

Aerial shot of textures from just another canyon in Kyrgyzstan.

Yurt in Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

The night sky of Kyrgyzstan is unpolluted. We stayed at this yurt. Looking at the beautiful night sky was a joy.

Albert Dros: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos Albert Dros.

kcontents


Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.07.21 22:29


Incredible Photos Capture Powerful Lightning Storms Over Volcano Eruptions

By Jessica Stewart on July 20, 2018


Chilean landscape photographer Francisco Negroni is known for his incredible images showing extreme weather conditions. His work grabbed international attention in 2011, when his photographs of the Cordón Caulle eruption went viral and earned him several awards. Negroni's photography is unique for its ability to crystalize powerful moments in nature, showing its fiery energy in an artistic manner.


Francisco Negroni Volcano Photography



경이롭기까지 한 화산분화 번개폭풍 찰라 사진 


네그로니는 

2008년 칠레의 라이마 화산이 분출했을 때 정치부문 사진기자로 일하고 있었다.


비록 그 순간을 촬영할 수는 없었지만, 그 화산 분화는 그의 흥미를 자극했고 

그에 따라 그의 진로를 바꾸게 하는 계기가 됐다.


"내가 그 폭발을 본 것은 아주 작은 부분이었다."" 하지만 그것은 나에게 

뭔가 이상한 것을 느끼게 하고 다음 분화 때 반드시 사진을 찍어야겠다는  

동기를 부여하기에 충분했다. 


그 폭발을 보면서 폭발 사진의 세계에서 새출발하게 된 계기가 됐다."


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Chul Hwang, conpaper editor, curator


Negroni was working as a photo reporter, covering political news, when he happened to come upon the Llaima volcano eruption in 2008. Though he wasn't able to photograph the moment, the eruption piqued his interest and caused him to switch directions with his career. “It was so little what I saw of that eruption,” he tells My Modern Met. “But it was enough for me to feel something strange and motivate me to be aware of the next eruption and travel to take pictures of it. Seeing that eruption was my real motivation to start in this world of eruption photography.”




While his technique varies according to the eruption, he mainly focuses on long exposures to pull out the detail and intensity of the event. Some of his most striking images depict dirty thunderstorms, which occur when lightning is produced in the volcanic plume. The phenomenon is caused by the collision of ash, rock, and ejecta, which produces static electricity. Studies have shown that dirty thunderstorms are present 27% to 35% of the time, making Negroni's work all the rarer.


Negroni continues to travel around Chile in order to achieve the best possible images of volcanic activity, even leading photo tours around the country. “I will continue trying to show eruptions in all their magnitude and hope that the world, in general, continues to be surprised with my photographs.”



Francisco Negroni is known for his stunning photos of volcano eruptions around Chile.

Francisco Negroni Extreme Weather Photography

Francisco Negroni Landscape PhotographyFrancisco Negroni Extreme Weather PhotographyFrancisco Negroni Volcano PhotographyFrancisco Negroni Extreme Weather PhotographyFrancisco Negroni Landscape PhotographyFrancisco Negroni Volcano Photography

Francisco Negroni: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Francisco Negroni.

kcontents



Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.07.12 23:49


Fisherman Catches Beautifully Rare “Cotton Candy” Lobster in Canada

By Jessica Stewart on July 11, 2018


Fisherman Robinson Russell has been fishing for over 20 years, but he wasn't quite prepared for what he saw in one lobster haul off Grand Manan Island in Canada. Mixed in with the other lobsters was one stunning crustacean with a translucent blue-pink shell. Dubbed a “cotton candy” lobster, Russell donated his find—which he named Lucky—to the Huntsman Marine Science Center in New Brunswick, Canada.


매우 드문 아름다운 코튼색깔의 바닷 가재

캐나다에서 잡혔다


Lobsters, which only turn red when cooked, can have a lot of color variations on their shells. In fact, Russell had previously pulled blue, yellow, and bright orange lobsters from the same waters. There even exists calico and split tone lobsters, but the chances of spotting those are 1 in 30 million and 1 in 50 million, respectively, according to the University of Main Lobster Institute. But, Lucky is quite rare. While some sources say that lobsters with coloration like Lucky's are found every 4 or 5 years, marine biologists told TIME that the lobster appeared similar to an albino—making it a 1 in 100 million find.




So why is Lucky's shell such a special color? According to Cynthia Callahan, manager of the Huntsman Marine Science Center, it could be due to a genetic mutation that causes different pigments in the shell to be expressed. Of course, the coloration makes camouflage difficult, which only adds to the lobster's rarity.


Happily for Lucky, he'll be safe and sound at the Huntsman, where he'll live out the rest of his life.


Watch the cotton candy lobster in action at its new home at the Huntsman Marine Science Center.



kcontents



Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.07.07 23:27


Incredible Winners of the 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

By Jessica Stewart on July 2, 2018


“Mermaid” by Reiko Takahashi / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. Grand Prize Winner and 1st place Nature. “I was fortunate to have encountered a humpback whale with her calf on my first day of snorkeling near Japan’s Kumejima Island. Most of the time, the calf stayed close to her mom. At one point, the calf began jumping and tapping its tail on the water near us—it was very friendly and curious. Finally, the mother, who was watching nearby, came to pick up the calf and swim away. I fell in love completely with the calf and it’s very energetic, large and beautiful tail.”


The 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year winner proves that pursuing your passion can bring great rewards. Japanese photographer Reiko Takahashi left her job as an engineer last year to follow her dream of becoming an underwater photographer. And now, her beautiful image of a humpback whale calf has garnered her the top prize of National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year.


Taken off the coast of Kumejima Island in Japan, the photograph was taken on the first day of Takahashi's trip to document whales and their calves. “It was a special scene for me, to be able to take a photo of the calf, completely relaxed in gentle waters,” said Takahashi. And now, she has a $10,000 grand prize to help further her career. “I really cannot believe it. It was my dream to win. I am honored and it will be the driving force for my future shooting.”


After months of entries, the winning photographs were selected from over 13,000 images. International photographers were encouraged to submit photos to one of three categories—People, Cities, and Nature. From there, an expert panel—which included Whitney Johnson, vice president of visual experiences at National Geographic, and polar photographer Camille Seaman—selected the winners.


“I was amazed at the quality of images and the sensibility towards subject in all three categories for this competition,” said Seaman. “Looking at hundreds of images choosing the winners was a daunting task. The images that stood out did so based not solely on their technical execution but also a sensitivity for a feeling of the moment and originality.”




See the top three winners in each category of the 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer to the Year contest.

2018 National Geographic Travel Photograph

“Geometry of the Sun” by Enrico Pescantini / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 2nd place Cities. “Teotihuacan means ‘the place where the gods were created,' and that's the exact feeling visitors have when they walk along the Avenue of the Dead at this Mexican archeological site. This pyramid was dedicated to the god of Sun, and I found it mesmerizing how the rising sun in the picture conquered just half the image, while the other half is in the shadows.
I have always loved archeology and ancient civilizations, so I couldn't wait to visit Mexico and explore the remains of the pre-Columbian civilization. I planned my visit to Teotihuacan at sunrise, to get a combination of golden sunlight, play of shadows, and few crowds around. I flew my drone to see if the image I had in my mind was really out there: luckily for me, this frame was just waiting for my camera!”

2018 National Geographic Travel Photograph

“Leida and Laëlle – I Will Life You Up” by Tati Itat / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 2nd place People. “Since 2016, I've been involved with Haitian immigrants and refugees living in my city, Estrela. I have become friends with some families, and especially with twin sisters, Leïda and Laëlle. They say living in Brazil is like living in paradise—very different from the reality of their country of origin. They dream of becoming models and teachers, as a way to earn money to bring their other relatives from Haiti to Brazil, to live all near one another.
On this day, they were playing in front of their home, improvising exercises to develop their imagination and creativity, as if they were actresses, and playing an imitation game with poses. Laëlle reached for Leida's face and lifted her head up, showing her where she should look. At this brief moment, I took the photo.”

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Winners

“Flamingos Taking Off” by hao j. / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 2nd place Nature. “Thousands of flamingos take off from the colorful salt Lake Natron in Tanzania. Before taking off, flamingos need to take a short run on water to build up some speed. at this time, Their long, red legs trod a series of water ripples on the surface of the lake. looking down from the helicopter, these ripple lines look like giant aquatic plants flowing in the water. This photo was taken from a helicopter.”


National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Winners

“Reflection” by Gaanesh Prasad / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 3rd place Cities. “On an early morning, I wanted to photograph the fog, which is epic in Dubai every year from December to January—and almost every photographer’s dream in this part of the world. Sadly, I could not get access to the rooftop and so I peeped through the glazed window on a lower floor. I was overwhelmed and excited to see how beautiful the city looks, and my excitement was quadrupled as soon as I saw the reflection of the road and building on the building that I was in. I immediately opened the window to the maximum permissible amount and clicked a single shot with stretched hands.”

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Winners

“Another Rainy Day in Nagasaki, Japan” by Hiro Kurashina / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 1st place Cities. “This is a view of the main street from a tram in Nagasaki on a rainy day. The tram is vintage, but retrofitted with modern ticketing equipment. A conductor is no longer on board—only the lone driver. The quiet streetscape seen through the front windshield of the tram somehow caught my attention. This view presents quite a contrast to busy urban centers in Japan, such as Tokyo and Osaka. The ride on a vintage tram through the relatively quiet main street was a memorable experience during our week-long visit to the historic city of Nagasaki.”

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Winners

“Alone in the Crowd” by Gary Cummins / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. Honorable mention Cities. “In this photo, I tried to bring the intense and stacked living conditions that Hong Kong is famous for into perspective for the viewer. With so many people living in small spaces, it's strange to see all these amenities empty. As a solo traveler, I’m often alone in crowds and this photo resonates with me. I barely scratched the surface of this incredible urban environment, but this image really summarizes my experience here.”

2018 National Geographic Travel Photograph

“Tea Culture” by Alessandra Meniconzi / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 1st place People. “For a long time, I have been fascinated by the ancient Mongolian method of hunting with Golden Eagles. In early 2018, I followed one family of eagle hunters during their migration from winter camp to spring camp.
Mongolia is sparsely populated, but the inhabitants have a very hospitable and welcoming culture. Tea for Kazakh culture is one of the attributes of hospitality. Tea isn't just a drink, but a mix of tradition, culture, relaxation, ceremony, and pleasure. Damel, seen here wrapped in heavy fur clothes, drinks a cup of tea to keep warm from the chilly temperatures in Western Mongolia.”


2018 National Geographic Travel Photograph

“Challenging Journey” by MD Tanveer Hassan Rohan / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 3rd place People. “This photograph was taken from Dhaka's airport rail station during the Eid vacation. People were returning to their village homes to spend Eid with families, and the rush at the last hour was immense. One man caught my attention: he was dangling on a train's handle with his family, trying to get inside the train. At that time, rain started and the train began to slowly move. The family had tickets to board the train, but couldn’t get to their seats. There are many people like him, who come to Dhaka for work—leaving their families and home villages—so when they get vacation, they don't want to miss the opportunity to spend time with dear ones, no matter what.”

2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year

“Mars” by Marco Grassi / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 3rd place Nature. “These natural sand towers, capped with large stones, are known as the Earth Pyramids of Platten. They are situated in Northern Italy’s South Tyrol region. Formed centuries ago after several storms and landslides, these land formations look like a landscape from outer space and continuously change over the years and, more accurately, over seasons. This natural phenomenon is the result of a continuous alternation between periods of torrential rain and drought, which have caused the erosion of the terrain and the formation of these pinnacles. As the seasons change, the temperatures move between extremes and storms affect the area, pyramids disappear over time, while new pinnacles form as well.”

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by National Geographic.

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Nature2018.06.30 01:31


Stunning Aerial Photos Offer a Unique Perspective of Venice

By Jessica Stewart on June 18, 2018


eing one of the most photographed cities in the world, it's hard to get a unique image of Venice. And yet, architect and photographer Dimitar Karanikolov managed to do just that with his stunning aerial photographs. People often think that the best views of Venice come by boat, but Karanikolov's drone photos show the incredible artistry in Venice's urban structures.


Waking up early to catch the sunrise, Karanikolov used a drone to capture incredible panoramas of the city. “Aerial photography allows a top-down view of the world—which could be done only with a drone or a satellite,” the photographer tells My Modern Met. “These straight down photos are very architectural, almost like a plan view, and completely different from the human, everyday perspective.”



Burnt sienna dominates the color palette, as tightly packed terracotta roofs are interspersed with splashes of blue canals and white marble facades. Reminiscent of ancient aerial maps of Venice, such as Jacopo de Barbari's View of Venice, the photos give us a bird's-eye view of the lagoon.


It was Karanikolov's desire to show off Venice's amazing urban planning, something his architectural background surely taught him to appreciate. And above all he wanted to show “a very familiar place from a unique new angle.”


These aerial views of Venice by Dimitar Karanikolov give a unique perspective on a city that's been photographed by millions.

Drone Photography Vence by Dimitar Karanikolov

Aerial Photography Venice by Dimitar KaranikolovAerial Photo of VeniceDrone Photography Vence by Dimitar KaranikolovDrone Photography Vence by Dimitar KaranikolovDrone Photography Vence by Dimitar Karanikolov

Dimitar Karanikolov: Website Behance | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use images by Dimitar Karanikolov.

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Nature2018.06.16 10:51


Clever Street Artist Transforms Ordinary Public Places Into Funny Installations

By Jessica Stewart on June 5, 2018


Four years ago, Australian artist Michael Pederson began placing his lighthearted, humorous street art installations in unexpected places. Playing with the public space we often forget to look at, Pederson's project Miguel Marquez Outside is a clever escape into the urban landscape.


Humorous Street Art by Michael Pederson


스트리트 아티스트, 평범한 길거리를 유머러스한 환경으로 변신시켜


그는 말한다

"어디서 영감을 얻었는지 정확히 기억이 나지 않는다.

그렇지만 이 일을 시작하기 전에 꽤 오랫동안 내 마음 속에 있었던 건 분명하다."


- 호주 아티스트 마이클 페더슨 -


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Chul Hwang, conpaper editor, curator




“I can't remember exactly what originally inspired me to do these outdoor projects, but it had been in the back of my mind for quite some time before I started,” Pederson tells My Modern Met. “I had a small drawing show a few years ago which featured images and text. One of the pieces was also placed in a more public context and seemed to work better that way. Placing something unexpected out on the street can have a powerful element of surprise. It really got me hooked, and I've wanted to explore street interventions ever since.”


Whether inspired by a particular space or object, or location scouting for a particular idea, Pederson's installations are a perfect demonstration of how the best street art is tied to its context. His work takes passersby out of their familiar scenery and gives them a jolt, forcing them to look closer in order to have a chuckle.


From musing about the reasons people seem to throw their shoes on electrical wires to embracing themes of solitude, Pederson's ironic art touches on universal concepts and questions. The artist hopes his work will provoke deeper thought about public space and how we can reconnect with our surroundings. “Humor is a great way of engaging people, even if there is something a little sad underneath some of the pieces. Hopefully, people will find something there to think about as well.”


Michael Pederson, also known as Miguel Marquez, has been creating clever street art installations across Sydney for over four years.

Humorous Street Art by Michael PedersonClever Street Art by Michael PedersonClever Street Art by Michael Pederson'Miguel Marquez Outside' by Michael PedersonFunny Street Art by Michael PedersonFunny Street Art by Michael PedersonFunny Street Art by Michael PedersonClever Street Art by Michael PedersonHumorous Street Art by Michael PedersonFunny Street Art by Michael PedersonFunny Street Art by Michael PedersonClever Street Art by Michael Pederson

Michael Pederson: Website | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Michael Pederson.

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Nature2018.06.16 01:25


Powerful Waves Crashing With the Force of Mythical Gods and Sea Creatures

By Jessica Stewart on June 12, 2018



“Sedna”


신의 힘을 보여주는 강력한 파도의 부서짐

선원이자 프로 사진작가인 레이첼 탈리바트  (Rachael Talibart)의 작품


With her series Sirens, Rachael Talibart continues to elevate wave photography to an artform. Working with high shutter speeds, the English photographer freezes water in time, immortalizing each powerful drop. Her passion for stormy weather was shaped by her childhood on the south coast of England, and her sensitivity in capturing waves has made her a premier outdoor photographer.


Ongoing since 2016, Sirens sees Talibart photographing waves at just the right moment. Each frame is titled after a mythical sea creature or Norse or Greek god. In Loki, an alien face appears in the waves, bringing the Norse god crashing down on the viewer. While at other times, the form of the wave itself recalls the god after which it's named (e.g. Medusa).



As a constant source of inspiration, the ocean continues to push Talibart in her photography. “For me, the ocean will always be a potent source of inspiration,” Talibart shares. “It makes small, unimportant things of us all yet, at the same time, it is exhilarating and profoundly life-affirming.”


Talibart will bring her Sirens series to the Brighton Photography Gallery for a solo exhibition opening in September 2018. Her book Sirens is also available for purchase via her website.


British photographer Rachael Talibart is known for her powerful photographs of waves.

Rachael Talibart - Wave Photography

“Goliath” Giant warrior (Hebrew)

Rachael Talibart - Wave Photography

“Mishipeshu Roars” Underwater panther (Native American)

Rachael Talibart - Wave Photography

“Pounce”

Wave Photography by Rachael Talibart

“Nyx” Goddess of the night (Greek)

Rachael Talibart - Wave Photography

“Sea nymph”

Wave Photography by Rachael Talibart

“Niobe”

Wave Photography by Rachael Talibart

“Nonook” King of bears (Inuit)

Photo of a wave by Rachael Talibart

“Loki” Trickster god (Norse)

Rachael Talibart - Wave Photography

“Maelstrom”

Wave Photography by Rachael Talibart

“Medusa” Snake-haired Gorgon (Greek)

Rachael Talibart - Wave Photography

“Poseidon Rising” God of the Sea (Greek)

In her series Sirens, each wave is titled after a mythical sea creature or mythological god.

Wave Photography by Rachael Talibart

“Oceanus” Titan Lord of the Sea

Rachael Talibart - Wave Photography

“Raptor”

Photo of a wave by Rachael Talibart

“Leviathan”

Photo of a wave by Rachael Talibart

“Ligeia” Derived from Greek λιγυς (ligys) meaning “clear-voiced, shrill, whistling”. This was the name of one of the Sirens in Greek legend. It was also used by Edgar Allan Poe in his story ‘Ligeia' (1838).

Rachael Talibart - Wave Photography

“Anapos” Water god (Greek)

Photo of a wave by Rachael Talibart

“Ceto” Primordial sea goddess (Greek)

Rachael Talibart - Wave Photography

“Kraken” Giant sea monster (Norse)

Rachael Talibart: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use images by Rachael Talibart.

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Nature2018.06.08 09:47


Mini Trucks in Japan Are Being Transformed Into Enchanting Tiny Gardens

By Kelly Richman-Abdou on June 7, 2018

 


Every year, the Japan Federation of Landscape Contractors hosts the Kei Truck Garden Contest, a quirky competition that turns tiny trucks into moveable gardens. The annual event attracts landscape artists all over the country, inviting them to pair their knack for gardening with a need for speed.


Kei Truck Garden Contest Garden Truck

Created by Fukuharu Landscaping


일본의 미니 케이 트럭, 정원으로 변신하다

눈길을 끄는 독특하고 아름다운 일본 정원 콘테스트 출품작이다.



Praised for its practical size and maneuverability, the miniature Kei truck fittingly has roots in Japan's construction and agriculture industries. Though typically used to transport materials to and from work sites, the vehicle has recently been reimagined as the foundation for these enchanting pop-up gardens.




Year after year, the eye-catching entries of the contest highlight the distinctive beauty of the Japanese garden. While most participants stick to traditional design elements, like pebble paths, sliding screen doors, and tranquil water fixtures, others have a more modern and minimalist look.


No matter the aesthetic approach, however, each exquisite creation proves that a flat bed can be a flower bed with a green thumb and a colorful imagination.


During the annual Kei Truck Garden Contest, talented landscapers turn the beds of their trucks into ornate Japanese gardens.

Kei Truck Garden Contest Garden Truck

Created by Kansai Ueki Co., Ltd.

Kei Truck Garden Contest Garden Truck

Created by Dry Landscaping Co., Ltd.

Kei Truck Garden Contest Garden Truck

Created by Takahashi Landscaping Co., Ltd.

Kei Truck Garden Contest Garden Truck

Created by Sancho Garden

Kei Truck Garden Contest Garden Truck

Created by Nishikawa Landscaping

Kei Truck Garden Contest Garden Truck

Created by Matsuda Landscape Construction

Kei Truck Garden Contest Garden Truck

Created by Showa Landscaping Civil Engineering

Kei Truck Garden Contest Garden Truck

Created by Kei's

Kei Truck Garden Contest Garden Truck

Created by Osaka Landscaping Civil Engineering Co., Ltd.

Kei Truck Garden Contest Garden Truck

Created by Tanaka Landscaping Co., Ltd. Civil Engineering

Kei Truck Garden Contest Garden Truck

Created by Takenaka Garden

Japan Federation of Landscape Contractors: Website | Facebook
h/t: [Spoon & Tamago]

All images via the Japan Federation of Landscape Contractors.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.06.05 17:50


Photographer Captures the Mystifying Moods of Mount Fuji at Dawn

By Emma Taggart on June 3, 2018

 

Earlier this month, we introduced you to Japanese photographer Takashi Nakazawa—a member of Your Shot, whose beautiful image of Mount Fuji was recently chosen by National Geographic as their June/July 2018 Traveler cover. As it turns out, Takashi has been enchanted by Japan’s tallest peak for several years and often spends his weekends capturing the iconic volcano in all its majestic beauty.


Mount Fuji Photography by Takashi Nakazawa


신비의 후지산 석양. 

일본의 사진작가 타카하시 그는 1년에 1만 가까운 사진을 찍는다


Shooting around 10,000 photographs a year, Takashi’s growing portfolio features stunning images of Mount Fuji in three different styles: color, black and white, and “blue ink.” While each collection captures a different mood, one thing remains constant—the powerful presence of Mount Fuji.


Often shot at night or in the early hours of the morning, the photographer’s monochrome and midnight-hued images highlight the natural wonder’s tranquility and mysterious allure. The sacred mountain is seen peaking above the white clouds and fog, while it’s reflected in the surrounding, glass-like Lake Yamanaka. The artist tells My Modern Met, “I hope that people around the world will know Japanese charm through my Mt Fuji photos. And I would like them to come to Japan and actually see it.”




You can see more of Takashi’s spectacular Mount Fuji photographs on Instagram.


Mount Fuji Photography by Takashi NakazawaMount Fuji Photography by Takashi Nakazawa

Often shot a night or in the early hours of the morning, the artist’s black and white photography highlights the natural wonder’s tranquility and mysterious allure.

Mount Fuji Photography by Takashi NakazawaMount Fuji Photography by Takashi NakazawaMount Fuji Photography by Takashi Nakazawa

Mount Fuji Photography by Takashi Nakazawa

The sacred mountain is seen peaking above the white clouds and fog, as the surrounding Lake Yamanaka below appears as still as glass.

Mount Fuji Photography by Takashi NakazawaMount Fuji Photography by Takashi NakazawaMount Fuji Photography by Takashi NakazawaMount Fuji Photography by Takashi NakazawaMount Fuji Photography by Takashi NakazawaMount Fuji Photography by Takashi NakazawaMount Fuji Photography by Takashi Nakazawa

Takashi Nakazawa: Website Facebook | Instagram | Twitter
Takashi Nakazawa “Art Fuji”: Website | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Takashi Nakazawa.

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Nature2018.05.26 09:23


Early Highlights of the 2018 Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

By Emma Taggart on May 25, 2018


“Split” by Geert Weggen


2018 코믹 야생동물 사진 콘테스트 중 

가장 재미있는 출품작 선정 공개


Whether an animal is the hunter or the hunted, surviving in the wild is serious business. And while many wildlife photographers aim to capture this “dog-eat-dog” world, some have been able to show that even the toughest creatures have their silly moments. Now in its fourth year, the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards recently released some of the funniest entries from the 2018 competition so far.


Founded by Tom Sullam and Paul Joynson-Hicks, the annual competition aims to “raise awareness of wildlife conservation through the power of laughter.” This year’s hilarious entries include a rather acrobatic squirrel, caught mid-split by Geert Weggen. Other funny animals include a friendly polar bear who appears to have waved at photographer Simon Gee as he took his shot, and an adorably-bashful rabbit captured by Daniel Friend.


Along with founders Sullam and Joynson-Hicks, this year’s judge panel includes wildlife TV presenter Kate Humble, actor and comedian Hugh Dennis, wildlife photographer Will Burrard-Lucas, wildlife expert Will Travers OBE, the Telegraph’s online travel editor Oliver Smith, and Managing Director of Affinity, Ashley Hewson. Chosen from five categories—On the Land, Under the Sea, In the Air, the Portfolio Category, and one Overall Winner—this year’s top prize is a one week safari trip to Kenya.


You can submit your own silly snapshots to the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards via the competition website—entries close on June 30, 2018!


Now in its fourth year, the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards recently released some of the funniest entries from the 2018 competition so far.

Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Mid-Way Entries

“Over Here” by Simon Gee



Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Mid-Way Entries

“So There” by Barney Koszalka

Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Mid-Way Entries

“Rabbit Hiding Face in Embarrassment” by Daniel Friend



Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Mid-Way Entries

“Astonished Lemur” by Jakob Strecker

The annual competition aims to “raise awareness of wildlife conservation through the power of laughter.”

Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Mid-Way Entries

“A Camera Steal” by Michou von Beschwitz


Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Mid-Way Entries

“I’ve got feather so I can have some bird food now“ by Maria Kula

Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Mid-Way Entries

“Bullies” by Amy Kennedy

Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Mid-Way Entries

“Strong Ant” by Muhammad Faishol



Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Mid-Way Entries

“Full Mouth” by Nick Parayko

Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Mid-Way Entries

“Dances with Bears“ by Luca Venturi

Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Mid-Way Entries

“Smiling Blue Shark” by Tanya Houppermans

The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.05.25 22:15


Stunning Photos Capture the Dreamy “Heaven on Earth” Landscapes of Patagonia

By Jessica Stewart on May 24, 2018




비엔나 출신의 소프트웨어 엔지니어 루카스 푸르란의 

아르헨티나 파타고니아 수려한 경관 작품



Vienna-based software engineer Lukas Furlan honed his passion for landscape photography during a recent trip to Patagonia. Fueled by wanderlust, Furlan is an avid traveler who photographs diverse locations, from Vietnam to Iceland. For a little over two weeks, the self-taught photographer soaked in the world famous Patagonian landscape, bringing home a camera filled with memories.


With an environment that seems plucked from a dream, Patagonia is a playground filled with snow-capped mountains and lush greenery. Furlan, who was pushed toward photography as a way to seek adventure and new challenges, captures the diversity of the terrain in his photographs. From the golden glow of the sun to the cool mist grazing the mountain tops, the young photographer's photos make you want to pack your bags for Patagonia immediately.


Patagonia - Wikipedia

edited by kcontents


Though he just got a small glimpse of the Patagonian landscape during his voyage, Furlan's vast portfolio clearly demonstrates what attracts so many travelers to the area. Water, trees, and mountains join together for an unforgettable landscape that ultimately creates postcard-perfect pictures.


Lukas Furlan's pictures of Patagonia show off the area's incredibly beautiful landscape.

Mountains in Patagonia by Lukas FurlanPatagonia Travel Photography by Lukas FurlanPhoto of Patagonia by Lukas FurlanNature in Patagonia by Lukas FurlanNature in Patagonia by Lukas FurlanPicture of Patagonia by Lukas FurlanPatagonia Travel Photography by Lukas FurlanPhoto of Patagonia by Lukas FurlanLukas Furlan Patagonia Photography
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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.05.24 09:10


Gorgeous Infinity Pool on Vietnamese Mountain Looks Like It’s Sitting on Clouds

By Sara Barnes on May 23, 2018

 

Infinity Pool by Topas Ecolodge


호앙 리엔 국립공원 토파스이콜로지


하노이에서 북서쪽으로 350km 떨어져있는 산악지대인 사파. 

그 곳에서도 셔틀을 타고 40분을 더 들어가야 갈 수 있는 곳


주커버그의 여름 휴양지이기도 하다

그곳에는 산신이 내린 놀라운 수영풀이 있다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Chul Hwang, conpaper editor, curator


Positioned on a hilltop in the mountains of Hoang Lien National Park is the Topas Ecolodge, an eco-conscious escape that’s about five hours away from Hanoi. The locale comprises 33 bungalows that each offer rustic interior decor and private balconies for gorgeous views of the surrounding hillsides and valleys below.


Topas Ecolodge provides a different experience than your standard hotel. They are concerned with their ecological footprint, and they employ minority tribe members from the nearby Thanh Kim and Thanh Phu villages. “We call ourselves a ‘lodge’ because we lack some of the basic features and services of a standard hotel,” they explain. “Our bungalows have no TV and no internet connection, enabling guests to completely escape from everyday life and immerse with nature.”




The distinct lack of technology allows you to immerse yourself fully in the surroundings—many of which you can admire from the breathtaking infinity pool. Added in 2017, the basin provides a picturesque peek down onto the Muong Hoa Valley. There, you’ll see layers of rice terraces and workers attending to their crops. The valley occasionally fills with fog, which makes the entire soaking experience seem like something out of a dream.


If you do find time to leave the pool, Topas Ecolodge has other amenities to indulge in. There is a spa on site where you can have a massage and herbal bath as well as places to go hiking and cycling. Additionally, there is a restaurant that features Vietnamese dishes with a European twist.


With its stunning location and dedication to eco-friendly tourism, it’s no wonder that the Topas Ecolodge has been named a Unique Lodge of the World by National Geographic.



The Topas Ecolodge is an eco-friendly getaway in Northern Vietnam.


Boasting gorgeous views from a mountaintop, they look even better from their infinity pool.

Infinity Pool by Topas EcolodgeInfinity Pool by Topas Ecolodge

In addition to the luxurious pool, the locale offers private balconies, spa treatments, hiking, and more.

Topas Ecolodge in VietnamTopas Ecolodge in Vietnam Topas Ecolodge in VietnamTopas Ecolodge in Vietnam

It's no wonder it was named one of the Unique Lodges by National Geographic.

Infinity Pool by Topas Ecolodge

Topas Ecolodge: Website | Instagram | Facebook

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Topas Ecolodge.



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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.05.16 23:51


Interview: Floral Installations Transform Gallery Spaces Into Immersive Indoor Gardens

By Emma Taggart on May 11, 2018


British installation artist Rebecca Louise Law creates stunning installation art made from thousands of real flowers, suspended with copper wire. Exploring the relationship between humanity and nature, the artist transforms art galleries, museums, and other public spaces into immersive indoor gardens that “cocoon” the viewer with floating flowers and gorgeous spectrums of color.



영국의 설치 예술가 레베카 루이제 로

그녀는 구리선을 이용해 수천개 꽃을 연결하여 작품을 만든다.



As a classically trained artist, Law’s inspiration comes from the work of abstract expressionists and their energetic use of bold color. However, rather turning to acrylics or oils, she opted for more organic materials. “The flower became my paint,” Law explains. As such, she creates mesmerizing, site-specific installations that capture the beauty of nature in three dimensions. By working with a variety of of fresh and preserved flora, Law’s ephemeral art transforms naturally over time—viewers can appreciate the changes in the natural material’s form, color, and texture as they wilt and dry.


We recently spoke with Law to ask about her inspirations and processes, as well as what it’s like to work with such a delicate material. Read on for our exclusive interview.


Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Hated Flower”, Coningsby Gallery, London (2014)


When did you first begin working with flora?


I have always used flowers within my art. As a child, my mother and grandmother encouraged me to press and dry flowers as well as the usual drawing and painting. I first used flowers as my art medium in 2003, whilst studying Fine Art at university. The flower became my paint, using the dried tones in layers, suspended with copper wire.




What inspired your hanging flower installations?


At university I loved the abstract expressionists, I wanted to create monumental colorful artworks that would make the viewer feel like they were cocooned by color. Rothko was a huge inspiration and Anya Gallaccio inspired me as an ephemeral installation artist. But I have to say that my biggest inspiration has always been nature itself. I can never seem to grasp the beauty we have been given on this earth, every installation I make I try to capture an essence of nature’s magnitude, but I never feel close enough.


Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Hated Flower”, Coningsby Gallery, London (2014)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Hated Flower”, Coningsby Gallery, London (2014)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Hated Flower”, Coningsby Gallery, London (2014)

How do you plan your installations?

Every new artwork is site-specific. Often, the country in which I am exhibiting has a rich symbolism associated with certain flowers—I like to do as much research as possible in terms of the material used. I also reuse flowers from previous installations; nothing I make is wasted and thousands of flowers have been re-purposed in my work. Each installation will take at least 6 months planning—mathematical calculations and meetings can become consuming before an installation is finally realized.

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Flower Garden, Display’d”, The Garden Museum, London (2014)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Flower Garden, Display’d”, The Garden Museum, London (2014)




Where do you source your flowers?

Most of my flowers are from the country that I am working in. If I cannot source flowers locally, I use flowers from Europe.

Do you consider the symbolism of each flower you choose to use?

The symbolism is often the strongest part of the artwork, but this will depend on the country and culture that I am making the artwork in. For example The Yellow Flower made in Japan was entirely inspired by the symbolism of the imperial emblem, the yellow chrysanthemum.

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Yellow Flower”, Japan (2014)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Yellow Flower”, Japan (2014)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“Life in Death”, Kew, London (2018)




Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“Life in Death”, Kew, London (2018)

Is it difficult to work with such a delicate material?

Yes. I think that is why it has had me captivated for so long. I always imagined that I would have moved on to a different material by now, but I still feel like I have so much to learn. It had been incredible to build my knowledge of how to keep a delicate material strong and durable and I have loved making artworks that challenge the longevity of such a fragile material.

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“Life in Death”, Kew, London (2018)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“Life in Death”, Kew, London (2018)



By sight, your installations look incredibly beautiful, but is scent also an important part of your work?

The scent can be intense. Life in Death at The Shirely Sherwood Gallery, Kewincluded spices as well as flora and grasses. Each natural element takes you on a scented journey, I love hearing the responses to my artwork in relation to smell.

What kind of impression or feeling do you hope to leave upon others who experience your immersive installations?

My work allows the viewer time to observe nature within a controlled space. The fantasy of rolling around in a field of wild flowers, contained and suspended in time. I hope that the artwork can be a place to escape and bathe in nature.

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Canopy”, Melbourne, Australia (2016)

Do you have any upcoming projects or exhibitions you'd like to share?

I have an exhibition about to launch in Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio. The artwork is called Community and is inspired by what the Museum represents to the local Toledo community. I will be using my own collection of material combined with over 10,000 locally grown plants. Each flower will be plucked and wired into the installation, while the plants will be planted around Toledo and given back to the local community. We will also have 1,000 hours of voluntary help from groups associated with the museum. I am incredibly excited about this installation and all it represents. It has been a year in planning and I leave in less than 2 weeks to get started with the install. This will be my largest installation to date with undulations of flora fresh and dried taking the viewer on a natural, sensual journey.

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“Drying”, House of St Barnabas, London (2016)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“Drying”, House of St Barnabas, London (2016)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

Still Life Exhibition, Broadway Studio & Gallery, Letchworth (2016)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

Still Life Exhibition, Broadway Studio & Gallery, Letchworth (2016)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Beauty of Decay”, Chandran Gallery, San Fransisco (2016)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Beauty of Decay”, Chandran Gallery, San Fransisco (2016)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Beauty of Decay”, Chandran Gallery, San Fransisco (2016)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The Beauty of Decay”, Chandran Gallery, San Fransisco (2016)




Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The City Garden”, The City Centre, London (2016)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The City Garden”, The City Centre, London (2016)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

“The City Garden”, The City Centre, London (2016)

Hanging Flowers Installation Art by Rebecca Louise Law

Rebecca Louise Law: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Rebecca Louise Law.

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Nature2018.04.28 13:00


Glacier calving



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Nature2018.04.26 00:36


World’s First Underwater Villa Offers Spectacular Living 16 Feet Below the Sea

By Sara Barnes on April 24, 2018

 


If you’ve ever dreamt of being like Ariel and living under the sea, now’s your chance to make your fantasy a reality. The Conrad Maldives Rangali Island recently announced what they believe to be the world's first underwater villa. They’re calling the stunning locale Muraka, or “coral” in Dhivehi (the local language of the Maldives), and it's projected to sit 16 feet and four inches below the surface of the ocean. You’re sure to feel truly immersed in the blue waters and bustling ocean life.


The undersea abode is designed to be a two-level structure that will straddle the waterline. Residents will sleep under the ocean’s surface in a suite that features a king-size bedroom and bathroom, as well as a living area for relaxation. Above the water, lead by a spiral staircase, Muraka will have a bevy of amenities that speak to its high-end, luxury living; the features include another bedroom, bathroom, powder room, gym, butler’s quarters, security quarters, second living room, kitchen, bar, and a deck for your viewing pleasure.



Conrad Maldives Rangali Island Underwater Villa

Bedroom




바다에서 4.8M 깊이에 있는 세계 최초 해저 빌라



Envisioned as a curved acrylic dome, the project will be completed by the end of 2018. Once done, it will be available at a starting rate of $50,000 a night. The villa will be fit to accommodate nine people.


This isn’t the first underwater venture that Conrad Maldives Rangali Island has created. In the mid-2000s, they opened Ithaa, the world’s first undersea restaurant.


Known for its underseas living, the Conrad Maldives Rangali Island has just announced their plans for a new underwater villa.

Conrad Maldives Rangali Island Underwater Villa

Bathroom



Called Muraka, they believe it to be the world's first underwater residence.

Conrad Maldives Rangali Island Underwater Villa

Corridor

Once completed in 2018, guests can sleep below water or enjoy the views above the sea.

Conrad Maldives Rangali Island Underwater Villa

Master Bedroom

Conrad Maldives Rangali Island Underwater Villa

Master Bathroom

Conrad Maldives Rangali Island Underwater Villa

Deck

Learn more about Muraka in the video below:

Conrad Maldives Rangali Island: Website | Instagram | Facebook

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Conrad Maldives Rangali Island.

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Nature2018.04.14 23:48


Spectacular Photos Capture Frozen Beauty of Largest Freshwater Lake in the World

By Emma Taggart on April 11, 2018

 


Moscow-based photographer Kristina Makeeva traveled to Lake Baikal in southern Siberia where she captured the beauty of the largest freshwater lake in the word. At around 600 kilometers long (373 miles), the vast, mirror-like surface features layers of transparent ice that has cracked and bubbled, leaving incredible, organic patterns and frozen formations.



Lake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeeva



세계 최고의 청정호수 러시아 바이칼호

바이칼 생수도 출시되어 있다.


With icy depths of 5,387 feet (1,642 meters) in certain areas, the freshwater lake’s frozen surface can withhold the weight of people and even cars. Known for its crystal-clear water, visitors can see into the green-blue abyss, where fish, plant life, stones, and various objects shimmer under the thick layer of ice. Shooting in an area with below-freezing temperatures, Makeeva came to the quick realization that many cameras could not cope in such frosty conditions, often only lasting around two hours before the batteries would give in.



Many of Makeeva’s images depict the thousands of large bubbles trapped beneath the surface which result from algae-produced methane gas. These glassy, pearl-like spheres are perhaps the reason for the lake’s nickname, “the pearl of Siberia.” The large cracks can span as much as 30 kilometers (8 miles) with widths of around 2 feet (2-3 meters). According to Makeeva, when they crack, the sound is “reminiscent of thunder or a gunshot.”


You can find more of Makeeva’s incredible images on Instagram.


Moscow-based photographer Kristina Makeeva traveled to Lake Baikal in Southern Siberia where she captured the beauty of the largest freshwater lake in the world.


Lake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeeva

Lake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeeva

Around 600-kilometers-long, the vast, mirror-like surface features layers of transparent ice that has cracked and bubbled, leaving incredible, organic patterns and frozen formations.



Lake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeeva

With icy depths of 5,387 feet (1,642 meters), the lake is known for its crystal-clear water.

Lake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeeva

Visitors can see into the green-blue abyss, where fish, plant life, stones, and various objects shimmer under the thick layer of ice.



Lake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeevaLake Baikal Photos by Kristina MaKeeva

Kristina Makeeva: Website | Instagram | 500px

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Kristina Makeeva.

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Nature2018.04.07 01:54

 

Traveling Photographer Captures Light Dancing Across Majestic Landscapes
 

By Jessica Stewart on April 5, 2018 
 
 
When we last checked in with Michael T. Meyers, he was capturing magnificent aerial images of Chicago. Now three years into his photography journey, Meyers has continued to develop his techniques and has spent the last year traveling across the United States and abroad. This has pushed him to experiment shooting under different conditions, and his growth as a photographer in this short time is astounding.


Indeed, a lot has changed for Meyers since we featured his photos almost one year ago. “I think I’ve grown a lot as a photographer, and my social media following has reflected that,” Meyers shares with My My Modern Met, “going from about 10k to nearly 70k followers on Instagram since your article.”  Now, more and more followers flock to see Meyers' photos, many taken from two memorable trips he took in the past year—a 12-day road trip around some of America's most famous natural landscapes and a trip to Cuba.

 

 


Michael T. Meyers Travel Photography

 

 

Both trips provided fertile ground for Meyers to experiment, as he further honed his skill at capturing the light and color of each landscape. From long-exposure night photos of the desert to the warm island atmosphere of Cuba, Meyers' growth as a storyteller is evident in his new work. And, during his US road trip, he realized that he didn't necessarily need to travel far in order to find some noteworthy landscapes to photograph.





“I learned a ton about shooting in different types of conditions and more importantly discovered first hand just how beautiful this country is. Everyone always seems like they’re in a rush to leave and travel abroad to see these amazing places—and for good reason—there are a ton of them in other countries. But there are also some pretty incredible spots here at home as well. And it’s kind of amazing how many different types of climates, ecosystems, and landscapes we have and how disparate they all are from each other.”

Instead, Cuba provided a strong contrast to what Meyers was used to and demonstrated how the power of a camera can lead to some unique encounters with locals. “I was taking a picture of an old car (as I did about a thousand times over the five days I was there) and an old man walked out of his house and began speaking with me,” Meyers remembers. “I told him that I was a photographer and he invited my girlfriend and I inside his home to show us a photo he had of his son with Castro. From a photography standpoint, it’s second to none. there’s not another place in the world that could be mistaken for Havana.”

With such rapid growth as a photographer, we can't wait to see where Meyers will land next, and what images he'll take away with him.

T0 push himself creatively, photographer Michael T. Meyers took a 12-day road trip to some incredible natural landscape in the United States, from Horseshoe Bend to Grand Teton National Park.





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Nature2018.04.01 16:04


Glass-Walled Cabin in Iceland Lets You Gaze at the Northern Lights Right From Bed

By Jessica Stewart on March 30, 2018





아이스란드의 파노라마 유리벽 민박집


북측에서 펼쳐지는 오색영롱한 빛의 향연을 

침실에서 바로 바라볼 수 있다.


아이슬란드의 수도인 레이캬비크에서 30분 거리에 위치해 있다

1박에 $420불 


조기에 예약해야 숙박이 가능하다.

8월말에서 4월말 사이에 찾는 것이 가장 좋다.



그러나 이것이 전부가 아니다.


피오르드에서 고래를 발견할 수도 있고 

해변에서 일광욕을 하고 있는 바다 표범을 볼 수 있다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Chul Hwang, conpaper editor, curator



If you want to take your Northern Lights watching to another level, you may want to book a stay at the Panorama Glass Lodge. Located in a remote area just 30 minutes outside of Reykjavík, this quaint lodge features an incredible view of the Icelandic landscape thanks to large glass windows that surround the bed.


Built to sleep two people, you can lounge while gazing at the stars above and the night sky around you. By encasing the sleeping area in glass, visitors are guaranteed an unobstructed view of nature night and day. Panorama Glass Lodge is located on the shores of the sea, and with only five other houses on the coastline—each a fair distance from the lodge—it's the perfect stay for those looking to unplug and unwind in complete privacy.



A hot tub located directly next to the lodge will keep you toasty while you stargaze and is a great option for adventurous honeymooners. For the best chance to see the Northern Lights, Panorama Glass Lodge recommends visiting between late August and late April and checking the Aurora Forecast frequently. But a colorful sky isn't the only thing you can expect, there's also a possibility to spot a whale out in the fjord or seals sunbathing on the beach.


Prices start from €342 (about $420) a night, but make your reservations early, as this glass oasis books up quickly.


The Panorama Glass Lodge is a private getaway in Iceland for two people, allowing you to take in nature straight from bed.

Panorama Glass Lodge - IcelandPanorama Glass Lodge - IcelandPanorama Glass Lodge - IcelandPanorama Glass Lodge - IcelandPanorama Glass Lodge cool hotels IcelandPanorama Glass Lodge - IcelandPanorama Glass Lodge: Website | Facebook | Instagram
h/t: [uncrate]

All images via Panorama Glass Lodge.

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