'engi's design all'에 해당되는 글 647건

  1. 2019.01.01 VIDEO: Vibrant Colored Pencil Drawings Filled in with the Colors of the Galaxy 호주 예술가의 초현실적인 색연필 그림
  2. 2018.12.19 Best of 2018: Top 10 Amazing Art Installations That Defined the Past Year
  3. 2018.12.09 VIDEO: Learning pottery gone right / Image topped coffee maker
  4. 2018.12.02 [위클리건설리포트 Weekly Report] 2018년 11월25일(일)~2018년 12월1일(토)
  5. 2018.12.01 Interview: Inspiring Photo Project Shines a Light on Babies With Medical Conditions
  6. 2018.11.28 Gorgeous Golden Light Shines Through This Autumnal Forest in the Netherlands
  7. 2018.11.26 Interview: One Photographer’s Journey to Immortalize the Nomadic People of Northern Mongolia
  8. 2018.11.10 실제 낯선 사람들을 만화 캐릭터로 바꿔주는 아티스트 Artist Transforms Real Life Strangers Into Pixar-Like Cartoon Characters
  9. 2018.11.05 The Enchanting History of Notre-Dame Cathedral’s Famous Gargoyles 프랑스 파리의 노트르담 성당의 괴물 석상의 빛나는 역사
  10. 2018.11.03 Photographer Sets Special Cameras for 1,000-Year Exposure of Lake Tahoe
  11. 2018.10.31 Amazing Winners of the 2018 Siena International Photo Awards
  12. 2018.10.17 Stunning Photos Capture the Fiery Passion of People in the Ocean
  13. 2018.10.03 Interview: Adventurous Travel Photographer Reflects on His Most Memorable Images 미지의 세계 전통적인 관습 다큐멘터리 사진들
  14. 2018.09.20 This Image of the Total Eclipse Is Being Called “History’s Most Amazing Photo” 역사상 가장 놀랄만한 개기식 사진들
  15. 2018.09.14 Dynamic Underwater Photos Look Like Dramatic Baroque Paintings 크리스티 리 로저스(Christy Lee Rogers) 바로크 수중사진 '뮤즈'
  16. 2018.09.13 Life its so beautiful
  17. 2018.09.05 VIDEO: Celebrities are matched with some VERY unflattering doppelgangers by new Google Art Selfie app..할리우드 도플갱어들
  18. 2018.09.01 Traveling Photographer Captures the Beautiful Unspoiled Landscape of Kyrgyzstan 키르기스스탄의 천혜의 경관
  19. 2018.08.26 Cinematic Portraits of a Young Kate Moss and Other Celebrities 케이트 모스와 키스 리차드에서 니콜 키드먼과 히스 레저까지,
  20. 2018.08.20 8 Real-Life Locations of Famous Paintings You Can Visit Today 8개소의 실제 장소와 일치하는 유명화가의 그림들
  21. 2018.08.11 VIDEO: Pasta Chef Handcrafts Rainbow-Colored Noodles Using All-Natural Ingredients 파스타 쉐프의 수제 레이보우 누들
  22. 2018.07.31 Interview: Alexa Meade Reveals Behind the Scenes of Painting Ariana Grande for Her Music Video 설치예술가 알렉사 미드의 보디 페인팅
  23. 2018.07.23 “DNA Braid” Hair Trend Turns Ordinary Locks Into Spiraling DNA Molecules
  24. 2018.07.21 Incredible Photos Capture Powerful Lightning Storms Over Volcano Eruptions 경이롭기까지 한 화산분화 번개폭풍 찰라 사진
  25. 2018.07.18 Choose your warrior..
  26. 2018.07.12 VIDEO; Fisherman Catches Beautifully Rare “Cotton Candy” Lobster in Canada 매우 드문 아름다운 코튼색깔의 바닷 가재
  27. 2018.07.09 Japanese Man Beautifully Documents His Family’s Life in a One-Room Apartment 원룸 아파트에서 가족들과 아름다운 삶을 사는 일본 사진작가
  28. 2018.07.07 Incredible Winners of the 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest
  29. 2018.07.06 Interview: Creative Dad Photoshops His Kids Into the Funniest Situations 아빠의 자식 사랑
  30. 2018.06.30 Stunning Aerial Photos Offer a Unique Perspective of Venice 공중에서 본 찬탄할 베니스
Nature2019.01.01 20:53


Vibrant Colored Pencil Drawings Filled in with the Colors of the Galaxy

By Emma Taggart on December 31, 2018

 

While some might consider colored pencils as mere art supplies for kids, more and more professional artists are using the common utensils to create awe-inspiring works that are a whole lot more than just childish scribbles. One creative to do so is Australian artist Georgina Kreutzer who creates vibrant, hyperrealistic color pencil drawings that showcase her incredible artistic skill.





 

호주 예술가의 초현실적인 색연필 그림


   어떤 사람들은 색연필을 단지 아이들을 위한 미술 도구라고 생각할지 모르지만, 점점 더 많은 전문 예술가들은 단지 유치한 낙서 이상의 경외심을 불러일으키는 작품을 만들기 위해 공통의 도구를 사용하고 있다. 


그렇게 하는 것 중 하나는 호주의 예술가인 조지나 크로이처(Georgina Kreutzer)인데, 그는 그녀의 놀라운 예술적 기술을 보여주는 생생하고, 초현실적인 색연필 그림을 만든다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator



edited by kcontents




From animal portraits to flashy sports cars, it seems there’s no end to what Kreutzer can draw. In one of her most recent pieces, the talented artist uses a combination of colored pencils and watercolor paint to render a giant, purple-hued moon. Rocky surfaces and lunar craters are detailed in a myriad of luscious, cosmic hues.


In other works, Kreutzer creates a series of drawings depicting pairs of men’s Oxford-style shoes. “Shoes are possibly the most ubiquitous design item in history,” she says, “I love sketching them.” From shiny leather uppers to decorative stitching, each pair is so detailed, it looks like it could be lifted straight off the page.


You can see more of Kreutzer’s incredible work on Instagram and buy limited edition prints via her website.




Australian artist Georgina Kreutzer creates vibrant, hyperrealistic color pencil drawings that showcase her incredible artistic skill.


Color Pencil Drawings by Georgina Kreutzer

Color Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina Kreutzer

Each work is so detailed, the items look as though they could be lifted straight off the page.

Color Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina KreutzerColor Pencil Drawings by Georgina Kreutzer

Georgina Kreutzer: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | YouTube

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Georgina Kreutzer.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.12.19 23:16


Best of 2018: Top 10 Amazing Art Installations That Defined the Past Year

By My Modern Met Team on December 15, 2018

 

In 2018, we saw an eclectic mix of installation inspiration, but there’s no denying that humanity’s relationship with nature was a prominent theme throughout the year. Ranging from poignant to playful, these works of art prompted viewers to engage with art from an environmental perspective.



2018년 최고의 작품들: 지난 해를 정의한 놀라운 10대 설치 예술 


Many of the year’s top installations dealt with ocean conservation, including Jason deCaires Taylor’s short-lived “inverse zoo,” Courtney Mattison’s ceramic coral reef, and StudioKCA’s large, litter-crafted whale. Some, like Thomas Dambo’s enchanting Troll Hunt, Ernesto Neto’s crocheted canopy, and HOTTEA’s Scope Art Show installation imaginatively showed appreciation for the natural world, while HYBYCOZO creatively captured the “patterns that appear in nature” with their laser-cut sculptures.




In addition to eco-centric works of art, Culturespaces, Yayoi Kusama, and JR and immersed viewers in artwork inspired by history, human interaction, and personal memories.


Explore these spectacular installations below.


Best of 2018: Top 10 Art Installations

Best Art Installations 2018 Art Installations

Photo: Jason deCaires Taylor and the Fairmont Maldives


Coralarium by Jason deCaires Taylor

British sculptor Jason DeCaires Taylor uses his practice to advocate for environmentalism. Time and time again, he’s wowed the world with his aquatic Earthworks, from solitary cement figures to an entire underwater museum. In 2018, Taylor added a new piece to his ambitious oeuvre: Coralarium, a submerged sculpture gallery.




Like all of Taylor’s creations, Colararium transcends its role as a work of art. Made out of punctured pH-neutral marine steel, this colossal cube doubles as an artificial reef, inviting sea creatures to swim around the structure and explore the figures dwelling in its interior.


“It’s almost like an inverse zoo,” deCaires Taylor said. “In cities, we go into space and look at caged animals. Whereas this is almost like we’re the tourists, but we’re in the cage and the marine life can come and go and look at us. It’s almost a reversal of how we interact with wildlife.”


Unfortunately, Colararium was destroyed by the Maldivian authorities in September. They deemed the piece “offensive to Islam” due to its depiction of human forms.


Best Art Installations 2018 Art Installations

Photo: Courtney Mattison


Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)by Courtney Mattison

Artist Courtney Mattison sculpts ceramic installations that “promote awareness for the protection of our blue planet.” As a part of the Art in Embassies program, Mattison was commissioned to create Confluence (Our Changing Seas V) for the United States embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Like other works in Mattison’s Confluence series, this large-scale piece comments on the fragility of the coral reef. Specifically, Confluence (Our Changing Seas V) explores the effects of coral bleaching, as it portrays a cluster of corals, anemones, and sea sponges spiraling into skeletons.



By drawing attention to this issue, Mattison hopes to promote coral conservation and encourage people to seek a solution. “It is possible for coral reefs to recover even from the point of bleaching if we unite and act quickly enough to decrease the threats we impose,” she says. “Perhaps if more people appreciate Indonesia’s spectacular reefs, we will act more wholeheartedly to preserve them for future generations.”

Best Art Installations 2018 Art Installations

Photo: StudioKCA

Skyscraper (the Bruges Whale) by StudioKCA

For this year’s Bruges TriennialStudioKCA and Hawaii Wildlife Fund collaborated to create Skyscraper (the Bruges Whale), a 38-foot installation. Intended to “show the scope and scale of the problem” with plastic waste, the monumental piece was crafted from 5 tons of litter fished out of the Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans.

StudioKCA opted to call the installation Skyscraper as a nod to the size of the whale. At 4 stories tall, it towers over the medieval buildings that line the Bruges Canal, making it a perfect symbol of the large-scale issue.



“A whale, breaching from the water, is the first ‘skyscraper of the sea,’ ” the artist said, “and as the largest mammal in the water, it felt like the right form for our piece to take in order to show the scope and scale of the problem.”

Best Art Installations 2018 Art Installations

Photo: Thomas Dambo

Troll Hunt by Thomas Dambo

Troll Hunt, an installation comprising six sneaky trolls, popped up in Illinois’ Morton Arboretum over the summer. Crafted by Thomas Dambo, these peculiar figures are made out of reclaimed wood, showcasing the artist’s ability to make “anything you can imagine out of trash.”

Once assembled, these site-specific sculptures came to measure anywhere from 15 to 60 feet tall. Though massive in size, Dambo skillfully hid the crafty trolls in the arboretum, inviting guests to use their Troll Hunter’s Handbook to track them down.



Though initially slated to last only through 2018, this installation will be on-view into the new year. Depending on weather, it may even last until summer 2019.

Best Art Installations 2018 Art Installations

Photo: Fondation Beyeler

GaiaMotherTree by Ernesto Neto

With his large-scale installations, conceptual artist Ernesto Neto “explores constructions of social space and the natural world by inviting physical interaction and sensory experience.” In 2018, he collaborated with Fondation Beyeler to create GaiaMotherTree, a crocheted structure that took root in Zurich’s Central Station.



This immersive work invites members of the public to step inside of its draping canopy and escape the hustle and bustle of the station. Once inside, they can observe the piece from a new perspective and experience another interactive layer of the installation: smell.

The “branches” of the tree are weighted with bags of spices. As the fragrant scents of turmeric, cloves, cumin, and black pepper waft through the air, viewers are invited—and reminded—to take a deep breath. “The idea is to slow down our time, for us to have time to breathe and feel life inside of us,” the artist says. “This work is all about intimacy.”

Best Art Installations 2018 Art Installations

Photo: HOTTEA

SCOPE Miami Installation by HOTTEA

Eric Rieger, also known as HOTTEA, creates sentimental yarn art inspired by memory. Since foregoing his spray-paint practice for something more meaningful, the former graffiti artist has crafted a collection of vibrant fiber installations. In 2018, he created a show-stopping work of art that welcomed visitors to SCOPE Miami Beach—a popular satellite art fair in Florida—with a dazzling gradient of rainbow color.



Tasked with creating a site-specific piece that would only be on view for one week, HOTTEA was determined to design an eye-catching installation whose message would have a lasting impact. “My installation for SCOPE Miami 2018 was inspired by the idea of taking things for granted,” HOTTEA told My Modern Met. “Even though we may take things for granted, once they are gone we wish we would have acted differently. Our sun, rain, wind, plants, animals, people, everything could disappear in seconds and when they do it is our memory of them that will carry on assuming there is something beyond our existence here on earth. What I hope people took away from my installation was not only a color experience they will not forget but also a reminder of how much a singular moment can mean.”

Best Art Installations 2018 Art Installations

Photo: HYBYCOZO

Installations in No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man by HYBYCOZO

Over the last few years, HYBYCOZO has taken Burning Man by storm with their installations. However, in 2018, the duo plucked their laser-cut polyhedrons from the desert and placed them in the museum for No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man.

Presented by the Renwick Gallery in Washington DC, this unique exhibition shows the work of HYBYCOZO in a new light. Three of their pieces—Inner Orbit: Lvov, Deep Thought, and Trocto—are included in this exhibition, illuminating the gallery’s walls with a dance of light and shadow.

No matter the context, HYBYCOZO hopes that all of their installations prompt “a sense of curiosity and wonder about the geometry of the shape and the meaning of the pattern” from all viewers.

Best Art Installations 2018 Art Installations

Photo: Culturespaces

Atelier des Lumières by Culturespaces

Culturespaces uses unique multimedia equipment to create and curate digital shows that “add dynamism to artistic practices, amplify emotions, and reach the largest possible audience.” This modern approach to exhibition is the driving force behind the Austrian art installation at Paris’ Atelier des Lumières.



Featuring 3,000 moving images made by 20 laser video projectors, this installation highlights the work of  Viennese artists, including Egon Schiele, Friedensreich Hundertwasser, and—most prominently—Gustav Klimt.

In addition to The Kiss and other works on canvas, this exhibition features projections of Klimt’s epic Beethoven Frieze, inviting “visitors who have never had the opportunity to visit the Secession Palace in Vienna to behold the iconic figures in Klimt’s frescoes” with a technological twist.

Best Art Installations 2018 Art Installations

Photo: Yayoi Kusama / MoMA PS1

Narcissus Garden by Yayoi Kusama

In 1966, Yayoi Kusama debuted her first Narcissus Garden. Intended to comment on the vanity and commercialization of contemporary art, the installation featured a field of reflective spheres—an element still present in today’s iteration at MoMA PS1.

For 2018’s Narcissus Garden, Kusama filled an abandoned U.S. military base in Fort Tilden with 1,500 stainless steel, mirrored balls. Much like previous editions, the spheres are intended to draw attention to the surrounding space and prompt viewers to contextualize their own reflections within this bigger picture.

Narcissus Garden was commissioned for Rockaway!, a free public art festival founded to support the redevelopment of New York’s Rockaway Peninsula area following Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

Best Art Installations 2018 Art Installations

Photo: RATP

Voyage avec d’autres by JR

In 2018, the eye-catching photographs of French street artist JR invaded Paris’ railways. Commissioned by the Paris transit operation RATPVoyage avec d’autres (“Traveling with Others) brought a bit of art to some of the city’s most bustling sites.



For this project, JR placed monumental photographs of people’s eyes in 11 of Paris’ metro and train stations. After a few weeks or installation, JR decided to gradually replace the existing artworks with new portraits taken by the artist in the very stations they adorn.

By rotating these new photos of “people passing in front of the previous eyes” into the series, JR creatively blurs the line between subject and spectator.

View Full Text

https://mymodernmet.com/what-is-installation-art-history-artists/

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.12.09 14:35


Learning pottery gone right




Image topped coffee maker 


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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Report2018.12.02 12:14


[위클리건설리포트 Weekly Report2018년 11월25()~2018 12월1()



  1. 첫 작업장으로 향하는 신형 세계 최대의 크레인 VIDEO: Check Out the Newest World’s Largest Crane As it Heads to its First Jobsite
  2. 소 잃고 외양간 고치려나?..."산자부·원전 공기업, 다음주 UAE 긴급 방문"
  3. 이촌동 한강맨션아파트/개포동 대청아파트 건축심의 통과
  4. 바뀐 건물주가 계약기간 끝나면 나가랍니다. 어쩌죠?
  5. 청와대 특별감찰반 김 모 행정관, 자신 감찰 부로 '셀프 승진' 시도 드러나
  6. 남자에게 좋은 직업?/하이 화이브 옹이! VIDEO: Don't Know what he is doing, but I want this job/You get a high five . you get a high five . everybody gets a high five
  7. 코 고는 여성, 남성보다 더 위험하다 Snoring Poses Greater Cardiac Risk to Women
  8. 군인을 슈퍼맨으로 만들어주는 7백만불 짜리 아이언맨 원격 제어복, VIDEO: The $7m 'Iron Man' exoskeleton that will give US soldiers superhuman strength and endurance
  9. [무너지는 외교] 친구 없는 친구 집' 체코에 왜 갔나…
  10. 국회, UAE원전 '정비계약 수주 불리한 상황'...탈원전 정책으론 거의불가능
  11. 아기 세례식/ 꿈나라/염소들의 곡예 VIDEO: Baptism/good night all.../Goats and bendy metal
  12. 화성 탐사선 인사이트 착륙 이후 무슨 일이 벌어졌을까? VIDEO: Mars InSight Stuck the Landing. Here's the First Thing It Did.
  13. 토요다, 실제 아바타 로봇 공개 VIDEO: Toyota reveals its real-life Avatar robot: Operators can control the life-sized humanoid from 6 MILES away
  14. 알래스카 규모 7.0 강진…앵커리지 재난지역 선포 VIDEO: Alaska earthquake: Here's what the destruction looks like from the scene
  15. 프랑수아 기조, "20대에 우익이면 심장이 40대에 좌익이면 뇌가 없는 것"
  16. 금리는 오르고, 전세가율 떨어지고..."갭투자자 빠지나?"
  17. "4번 아이언, 하이브리드로 바꿔야 하나?" VIDEO: STUDY: 4-IRON VS. 4-HYBRID (POWERED BY ARCCOS)
  18. G20 아르헨티나 한국과 중국 영접 모습
  19. 文정부 해외수주 '제로'..."원전·훈련기·고속철 모두 '꽝'"
  20. 北 '빛나는 조국' 공연한 5~6세 아이들, 관절염·방광염으로 고통"
  21. The Republic of Korea actively supports the freedom navigation of allies and friendly nations! Every Saturday at Gwanghwamun
  22. [VOA Washington Talk] 북한의 비밀 시설…인권 피하는 북한 VIDEO: N.Korea's Human rights
  23. 비행기에 호텔이...세계 최고의 1등석 톱 5 VIDEO: The Most Expensive First Class Airplane Seat
  24. 런던 스카이라인을 바꾸어 놓을 튜울립 모양의 타워 VIDEO: Architects Design Tulip-Shaped Tower to Enhance London’s Skyline
  25. G20 한국 패싱
  26. 바이올리니스트 사라 장의 애견과 해피 홀리데이! Sarah Chang and her puppy's Happy Holidays to everyone!
 

건설매거진 [콘페이퍼]2018년도 11월호

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.12.01 02:29


Interview: Inspiring Photo Project Shines a Light on Babies With Medical Conditions

By Kelly Richman-Abdou on November 30, 2018

 


질병을 가진 아기에게 빛을 비추는 사진 프로젝트


사진작가 안젤라 포커의 손자가 몇 년 전에 태어났을 때, 그녀는 새로운 관심사인 신생아 사진을 발견했다. 비록 이 전문 분야가 "재미있는 작은 취미로 시작되었지만" 그것은 그 이후로 베이비 이마티놀트의 중심에 있는 성공적인 사업으로 성장했다. 현재 진행 중인 이 프로젝트는 사진술의 마법을 통해 아기들을 즐겁게 만들어주는 놀라운 장면들을 유아들 주위로 만들어내고 있다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator




When photographer Angela Forker’s grandson was born a few years ago, she found a new focus: newborn photography. Though this speciality “started off as a fun little hobby,” it has since grown into a successful business, with Baby ImaginArt at the heart of it. This ongoing project builds wonderfully whimsical scenes around infants, transporting them to a delightfully creative world through the magic of photography.


What sets Forker’s baby photography apart is her focus on children with special medical needs in her Precious Baby Project. “It is my desire to spread hope and raise awareness for babies with special needs as I take stunning and/or fun photos of babies with various medical needs,” she admits. “I want to show the world that every baby is precious!”


In this inspiring series, Forker illustrates the resilience and strength that is born out of special needs. In order to prove that all life is nothing short of a miracle, she does not conceal the tiny tots’ conditions; instead, she highlights their differences “to raise awareness for the beauty of life,” medical tubes and all.




This series has seen massive success—and not just with her subjects’ proud parents. Many hospital clinics and maternity wards across the country have opted to adorn their walls with Forker’s fitting photographs, spreading her inspiring message and reminding families in similar situations to stay hopeful.


We recently had the chance to speak to Forker about the Precious Baby Project. Read our exclusive interview below to find out more about her amazing work.


Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities As a photographer, have you always been interested in capturing portraits of newborns?




Everyone thinks I’ve been a newborn photographer for many years. To be honest, though, I’ve only been a professional newborn photographer for less than four years.

My husband and I were missionaries to Italy when my first grandson was born. I started taking his photos and what started off as a fun little hobby has turned into a passionate business that has gotten great attention! I specialize in newborns and babies. It was my newborn grandson that got me hooked and I believe that is where my heart will always be!

Your amazing series, the Precious Baby Project, spreads awareness through creative photoshoots. What are some examples of the medical conditions you’ve spotlit?

I try to include great diversity in the Precious Baby Project. This includes cultural diversity as well as medical conditions. This is only a partial list of some of the medical conditions: Trisomy 9 Mosaic, Down syndrome, brain injury, blood clot/arm amputee, Schizencephaly, various heart conditions, brachial plexus injury, Goldenhar Syndrome, 7th nerve facial paralysis, cerebral palsy, Kagami-Ogata syndrome, spinal muscular atrophy, and lissencephaly.

Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities How do you come up with the imagery featured in your adorable Baby ImaginArt scenes? Do you have any particularly memorable photoshoots?

The scene of the “Forget-Me-Not Fairy” is especially sad and beautiful. Her parents contacted me saying they were told their baby might only have 6-12 months left to live. It was important to me to create a scene that would help them remember her life. Her name is Ellis Rose, so I incorporated roses. She is such a blessing to her family (who chose to adopt her specifically because she has special needs!), so I thought it would be special to have her watering love wherever she goes. And of course, she is a Forget-Me-Not Fairy, because—even though she may be leaving them soon—she will never be forgotten.

Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities [continued] The scene of the baby walking a tightrope in the night sky is called “The Brightest Stars.” I was inspired by John Green’s quote: “The darkest nights produce the brightest stars.”

When this little guy’s mother, Lydia Leinbach, was still pregnant, she saw my work for the Precious Baby Project displayed at her OBGYN at the local hospital. She wrote to me saying, “This morning I had my appointment at this office where your artwork was hung, and it instantly brought a smile to my face and reminded me that while my baby might have a defect, he is still perfect and will only bring joy to my life. Thank you so much for sharing these photos!”

We immediately started planning her session after her baby had recovered from open heart surgery. Since her baby was born with only half of a functioning heart, I decided to make a constellation of stars around him in the shape of a heart, but left the heart incomplete. It has been a dark night for this family, but this precious baby boy is their brightest star!

Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities [continued] “Fun with Friends” is a perfect example of how I take a baby’s condition into consideration and try to incorporate it into the scene. This baby girl has Spina Bifida and bilateral clubbed feet, which makes her body naturally bend in a “V” so I tried to think of something that would work with her body bent. Flying into the air from a seesaw was the perfect scene for her!

Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities [continued] For the scene, “Mended Heart,” the baby boy had undergone one heart procedure and was getting ready for his first open heart surgery. I wanted to include a lot of symbolism for CHD (Congenital Heart Disease), so I incorporated the colors red and blue throughout the scene as well as a CHD tree with the awareness ribbon. Since this baby’s heart is still in the process of being mended, I decided to add a bear sewing his heart with love, with the stitching not yet complete.

Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities [continued] My most challenging session was the “Love” scene. This baby’s medical condition is so complex that I had no idea how I could incorporate all of his tubes and wires. It finally came to me to place them down his body and have them come back up, forming the letter V in the word love. What I thought would be too simple of a scene ended up being by far the most popular scene I have ever created. Grown men have been moved to tears when they have seen that image.

Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities [continued] The one scene that best describes the Precious Baby Project is the “Hope is in our Genes” scene. Since this is the motto for rare disease awareness, I thought it would be fun to have this adorable baby boy with Trisomy 18 and 2 bear friends, all wearing jeans and flying away with some balloons made out of jeans that spell out hope. I also created a “gene tree” made out of jean material and shaped to look like genes. Whether it is at the local YMCA or the different clinics at the hospital where these canvases are displayed, the “Hope” scene is always the largest, central piece of the collection.

Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities [continued] The gratitude from these parents is overwhelming—especially from parents of babies who have a terminal illness. The mother of the beautiful baby in the “Believe” scene wrote to me these very moving words, “I know some day (hopefully not any time soon) those memories and photographs will be all I have so I want you to know how important the work that you do is to me and other parents with special needs children with terminal illnesses. Thank you.” Her words drive me to create scenes with great meaning for parents of babies who are terminally ill.

Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities What challenges has this project presented?
One of the greatest challenges that I face with this project is trying to balance my time. Every session takes approximately 20 hours of my time. (It takes 4-10 hours just to create the scene!) It is a delicate balancing act trying to do my paid work while also working on this project which is so dear to my heart.

What do you hope for the future of The Precious Baby Project?

My hope is that this project will go on indefinitely. I want to be able to touch as many lives as possible: both the participants as well as people who see my artwork.

I believe these babies’ photos have a great purpose in this world. I hope to see them displayed in other locations, like they are at our local YMCA and several clinics at our hospital. I also think that if they were in books, they would have the power to change how people—both young and old alike—see babies with special needs. I think I’m redefining beauty. I’m wanting to show people that if you look deep within people you will find a new kind of beauty—a captivating beauty—that touches you deep inside your heart.

These babies and I are on a mission: We want to show that world that babies with special needs are beautiful, while spreading hope and joy!

See more inspiring shots from the Precious Baby Project below.

Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities Precious Baby Project Angela Forker Babies with Disabilities

Precious Baby Photography: Website | Facebook | Instagram 

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Angela Forker.

KCONTENTS



Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.11.28 01:35


Gorgeous Golden Light Shines Through This Autumnal Forest in the Netherlands

By Jessica Stewart on November 26, 2018




네덜란드의 풍경 사진작가 알버트 드로스는 아름다운 단풍을 발견하기 위해 버몬트의 언덕을 방문하거나 전 세계를 건너 일본으로 갈 필요가 없었다. 몇몇 특이한 기후 덕분에, 그는 자신의 뒷문을 똑바로 바라볼 수 있었고 네덜란드의 숲 곳곳에 다채로운 나뭇잎들이 흩어져 있는 것을 발견할 수 있었다.


Dutch landscape photographer Albert Dros didn’t have to visit the hills of Vermont or fly across the globe to Japan in order to spot some beautiful autumn foliage. Thanks to some unusual climate, he could look right to his own backdoor and find colorful leaves scattered throughout the Netherlands’ forests.


Recently, Dros had spent hours exploring the forest near his house, getting lost in the beauty of the fall season. The photographs he came away with demonstrate just how creative one can get in nature. Though taking photographs in the forest can be a difficult endeavor, it’s one that’s all the more rewarding when the images come out as planned.


“The light changes every minute, so every minute new compositions pop up. You’re basically chasing the light nonstop,” he writes. “This, combined with looking in the distance for compositions with your telephoto and also having to look close for potential wide angle shots (very difficult in the forest), makes it very challenging.”




From stunning images that use the sun’s rays to create atmosphere to bright pops of color provided by the red, yellow, and orange leaves, Dros’s autumn foliage portfolio is breathtaking. Elements like curving roads and the use of a wide-angle lens in some instances give a diversity to the imagery and show just how creative photographers can get in a forest environment.



Landscape photographer Albert Dros took advantage of unusual weather to photograph stunning fall foliage in the Netherlands.

Photo of Fall Foliage by Albert Dros
Photo of Autumn Foliage by Albert Dros
Golden Autumn Foliage Photography Albert Dros
Foliage Photography by Albert DrosPhoto of Autumn Foliage by Albert DrosPhoto of Autumn Foliage by Albert DrosPhoto of Autumn Foliage by Albert DrosFoliage Photography by Albert DrosFoliage Photography by Albert DrosFoliage Photography by Albert DrosPhoto of Fall Foliage by Albert Dros

Next: Enjoy more stunning images of the atmospheric forest.

Dros captured the colorful, sun-soaked forest in atmospheric detail.

Photo of Fall Foliage by Albert Dros

Foliage Photography by Albert DrosFoliage Photography by Albert DrosFoliage Photography by Albert DrosPhoto of Autumn Foliage by Albert DrosPhoto of Fall Foliage by Albert DrosPhoto of the Forest by Albert DrosPhoto of Fall Foliage by Albert DrosAlbert Dros: Website | Facebook | Instagram

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
분류없음2018.11.26 19:43


Interview: One Photographer’s Journey to Immortalize the Nomadic People of Northern Mongolia

By Jessica Stewart on November 25, 2018

 

Belgian photographer and professional dancer Shed Mojahid is known for his ability to capture the acrobatics of dancers in motion. But recently, his interests brought him across the globe to Mongolia, where he embarked on a challenging mission. After extensive research and travel, he found himself in the northern part of the country to photograph the Dukha people.




 

마지막 유목민 차탄족(Tsaatan) 


  벨기에 사진작가이자 전문 댄서인 쉬드 모자히드(Sheed Mojahid)는 움직이는 댄서들의 곡예를 포착하는 능력으로 유명하다. 하지만 최근, 그의 관심은 몽고로 집중됐고 그곳에서 그는 도전적인 임무를 시작했다. 광범위한 연구와 여행 후에, 그는 듀카 사람들의 사진을 찍기 위해 북부 지역에 있는 자신을 발견했다.


차탄족(Tsaatan)로도 알려진 순록 무리와 함께하는 전통을 이어가는 몇 안 되는 부족들 중 하나이다. 불행히도 순록의 수가 줄어들면서, 약 40가구만이 살아남아 그들의 독특한 공동체를 기록하는 것은 모자히드의 최종 목적이었다. 모자히드는 전통적인 유목민 주택 안에 사진 스튜디오를 만들었다. 여기서, 그는 그들의 신뢰를 얻고 그들의 초상화를 찍기를 바라며, 부족들이 안으로 들어오기를 끈기 있게 기다렸다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator


edited by kcontents




Also known as the Tsaatans, this small community of reindeer herders are one of the few to carry on the tradition. Unfortunately, as the reindeer population shrinks, only about 40 families continue on and it was Mojahid’s vision to document their unique community. As part of his project, Mojahid created a photography studio inside a traditional nomadic dwelling. Here, he waited patiently for members of the camp to come inside, hoping to gain their trust and snap their portrait.


This sensitive approach is evident in the results of the project. The portraits show the openness and warmth of the Dukha, as they pose within the dwelling or, occasionally, against the Mongolian landscape. Mojahid’s journey to Mongolia is, above all, a story of personal perseverance and patience, resulting in creative output that includes both still photos and a short documentary.


Read on as we chat with Mojahid about his inspiration for the project and how he prepared himself to dive into Mongolia.




Portraits of the Dukha People in Mongolia by Shed MojahidWhat sparked your interest in photography?


I started my photography studies but I quickly quit because dance was taking a bigger role in my life.

From an early age, dance allowed me to travel all around the world. At that time, there was a lot of buzz around Youtube videos so I bought a camera to record and took pictures of my crew (Hoochen Crew) and myself in order to post them on the internet. Step by step, I started to appreciate things and I got some good feedback about my work.




How do you think your background in dance has influenced your style of photography?


Without dance, I would never have done what I’m doing now! Dance has developed a sense of creativity within me, dance pushed me to go further, to bounce back after injuries and to develop my own world. I don’t really pay attention to other photographers. I don’t claim that I’m better but I just want to stay focused on my ideas and my universe, as I did with dance.


Portraits of the Dukha People in Mongolia by Shed MojahidWhat was the inspiration for your photo project in Mongolia? How did you first hear of the Dukha?


I already did an exploration in Iceland a few months ago and things went well. At the end of our journey, I asked my buddy where he wanted to go next. He answered Mongolia… a few months later, we were in Mongolia.



I started to do some research online and I heard about Jimmy Nelson who did nice work in Mongolia with the Kazakhs, but I didn’t want to replicate it and I wanted to do things on my own. Right after, I found some information about these northern people. I finally decided to choose the Dukha!

Portraits of Mongolian Nomads by Shed MojahidWhat sort of research did you do before going on the trip?

The first thing was how to reach the Dukha camp and the transportation—no tickets were available online! We just hoped to get lucky enough that the timing and booking would go as planned. The Visa application was hard also to obtain because China requires a hotel with booking voucher. Our train tickets were already bought; therefore, how to explain that we will sleep in a nomad camp and that China is only a leg in our trip to cross the border? It was also hard to find an interpreter who could accompany us and stay with us the whole journey. I also looked for equipment rental companies but couldn’t find anything so I brought mine.

Lastly, figuring out if it was doable to let the Dukha know about our arrival, but again—IMPOSSIBLE!

Portraits of the Dukha People in Mongolia by Shed MojahidYou had an interesting approach to set up a photography studio in your tipi instead of moving around to find subjects. Why this technique? What do you feel were the successes and failures of such a setup?


Taking photos of them in their natural environment was something already done. Additionally, these people don’t have internet, so photographing whilst not seeing the results is something that bothers me a lot. I wanted to give them something different in an intimate setting, enabling them to be photographed or not. Also, it allowed me to print their pictures so they can get them directly.

I think a studio in the tipi was a success, no failures really happened, but it was a risky gamble because I could have come back without any results if they didn’t trust me!

Just to give you an indication: during seven days in the camp, only one day was dedicated to a shooting session. The other days? Doubts, hesitations, program changes, mind changes… This part is explained further in my exhibition and my documentary.

Portraits of the Dukha People in Mongolia by Shed MojahidWhat was the most challenging part of your time in Mongolia?

The travel by itself clearly, we spent seven days traveling from Beijing… it was very long! The home stretch was done on horseback in a 10-hour non-stop sprint. It was very hard.


How did you go about building trust with the locals? What did they think of your project?

I did nothing special. I was just myself—natural and patient. I tried to get to know everyone, I gave gifts to the kids (winter clothes), medications to elders, accessories to adults (knives, lamps) and as time went, trust was developed.

I don’t really know what was their thoughts are about my project but they were a bit suspicious in the beginning.

Portraits of Mongolian Nomads by Shed MojahidDoes your experience match what your expectations were prior to visiting?

I wish I could have photographed all the people from the camp but it was impossible. Women often turned down my invitations… always with a smile. Sometimes, we were eating and smiling together for hours, I was thinking “Haaa I think they will accept now” and still with the smile, they said no.


A lot of things can explain these refusals, especially their own vision of their beauty, the standards—they are not used to this type of exercise. But more than the results, what matters the most was the approach and the human adventure.

As you can imagine, with my two bags of material, I could have taken some high-quality candid pictures, but I wasn’t interested. I really think photography has to be thought about on a more human perspective.

Portraits of the Dukha People in Mongolia by Shed MojahidWhat do you hope people take away from the work?

That Mongolia is a beautiful and warm country, giving motivation to photographers to believe in themselves and to go towards their projects. If I did it, then everyone can!


I also hope people will think twice about their photographic approach and philosophy. You must be immersed in a universe before getting into it once there, and I insist, accept the rules. Time, and our relationship with it, was a real discovery and if we weren’t patient and open-minded by not imposing our visions, then we could have come back quite frustrated. I really urge,  especially during our fast technological era that allows us to do a lot, to emphasize quality and not quantity.

Portraits of the Dukha People in Mongolia by Shed MojahidWhat’s next?

Further, higher, crazier…

Portraits of Mongolian Nomads by Shed Mojahid

Learn more about Shed Mojahid’s journey to Mongolia to visit the Dukha people in this short documentary about the project.



Shed Mojahid: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Shed Mojahid.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.11.10 00:05


Artist Transforms Real Life Strangers Into Pixar-Like Cartoon Characters

By Emma Taggart on November 8, 2018


If you’re a fan of Pixar, you’ve probably wondered what you might look like as one of their iconic animated characters. 3D artist Lance Phan makes those dreams come true by transforming ordinary people into uncanny cartoon versions of themselves. From one-person portraits to cute couple snapshots, the resulting stylized characterizations look just like stills from the animation studio’s next big movie.


3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan




 

실제 낯선 사람들을 만화 캐릭터로 바꿔주는 아티스트


제출된 사진을 참고 자료로 사용하여 판(Phan)은 디지털 텍스처와 3차원 모델링을 적용하여 마법을 부린다. 각각의 작품은 예술가의 놀라운 재능, 매력적이고 고화질적인 디테일로 가득 찬, 각각의 인물의 성격을 보여준다. 섬세한 머리카락에서부터 반짝이는 눈까지, 판(Phan)의 캐릭터들은 픽사(Pixar)가 유명 값을 하듯이 매혹적인 삶의 질을 제공받는다.


픽사(Pixar) 초상화를 얻기 위한 긴 대기자 명단이 있다는 것은 놀라운 일이 아니다. 판(Phan)의 작품은 수요가 너무 많아서, 스튜디오에서 자신을 돕기 위해 다른 사람들을 훈련시키기까지 했다. 만일 여러분이 만화 캐릭터로 어떻게 생겼는지 보고 싶다면, 팬의 웹사이트에서 요청할 수 있다


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator


edited by kcontents




Using submitted photographs as his reference, Phan works his magic by applying digital textures and three-dimensional modeling. Each work is a testament to the artist’s incredible talent, full of charming, high-definition details that bring out the personality of each character. From delicate strands of hair to glistening eyes, Phan’s characters have been given that enchanting life-like quality that Pixar is famous for.


It’s no surprise that there’s a long waiting list to get a “Pixar-fied” portrait. Phan’s work is so in demand, that he’s even started training other artists to help him in his studio. If you want to see how you’d look as a cartoon character, you can request a commission on Phan’s website.


In the meantime, you can see more of Phan’s Pixar portraits on Instagram.




3D artist Lance Phan transforms photos of ordinary people into uncanny cartoon characters.

3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan

3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan

The resulting stylized characterizations look just like stills from the next big Pixar movie.

3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan

Each portrait is skillfully rendered by applying digital textures and three-dimensional modeling.

3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan3D Pixar Cartoon Characters by Lance Phan

Lance Phan: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Lance Phan.

kcontents



Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.11.05 19:48


The Enchanting History of Notre-Dame Cathedral’s Famous Gargoyles

By Kelly Richman-Abdou on October 18, 2018


Notre Dame Grotesques Notre Dame Cathedral Notre Dame Gargoyles Notre Dame Sculptures




 

프랑스 파리의 노트르담 성당의 괴물 석상의 빛나는 역사


파리의 노트르담 대성당은 고딕 건축의 가장 정교한 건축 예술들 중 하나로. 중세 시대에 지어졌으며 수세기 동안 숭배자와 관광객들을 환영하며 하늘 높은 첨탑 스테인드글라스 창문 그리고 수려한 조각품에 대한 경외심을 불러일으켰다.


성인과 예언자 같은 성인의 조각 그림들 중에서 성당의 외관은 또한 악령으로부터 교회를 보호하기 위한 돌조각상인 괴수들을 특징으로 한다. 


노트르담의 신화는 기능하는 가각과 키메라라고 불리는 신기한 장식 조각품 컬렉션을 포함한다. 그들은 "괴물석상"으로 알려지게 되었고 아마도 이 성당의 가장 유명한 특징적인 조각품일 것이다


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator


edited by kcontents




Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris is celebrated as one of the most exquisite examples of Gothic architecture. Constructed in the Middle Ages, the church has welcomed worshippers and sightseers for centuries, inspiring awe with its sky-high spires, ethereal stained glass windows, and spell-binding sculptures.


Among carved depictions of holy figures like saints and prophets, the cathedral’s exterior also features a menagerie of grotesques, stone creatures intended to protect the church from malevolent spirits. When these statues double as waterspouts, they’re known as gargoyles—though the popular term is often mistakenly applied to the entire grotesque family.


The grotesques of Notre-Dame, for example, include both functioning gargoyles and a curious collection of decorative sculptures called chimera. While the latter do not drain water, they’ve come to be known as “gargoyles,” and are arguably the cathedral’s most famous feature.


Notre Dame Grotesques Notre Dame Cathedral Notre Dame Gargoyles Notre Dame Sculptures


The Original Gargoyles

Under Bishop Maurice de Sully, Notre-Dame’s construction started in the 1160s and lasted nearly 200 years. At the start of this endeavor, gargoyles were not a staple of French architecture. However, by the middle of the 13th century, the Gothic style was gaining popularity, with gargoyles at the forefront.


Inspired by age-old models found on temples in Egypt, Rome, and Greece, architects began adorning their designs with gargoyles in the Middle Ages. To reimagine this ancient concept, they looked to French folklore—namely, the 7th-century story of Saint Romain and La Gargouille, a fire-breathing monster whose head was nailed to a church to serve as a waterspout.

What is a Gargoyle Gargoyles and Grotesques Chimera

A statue of Saint Romain with Le Gargouille at his feet (Photo: Giogo via Wikimedia CommonsCC BY-SA 3.0)

As Gothic churches grew in size, so did their need for drainage systems. When paired with the increasingly superstitious nature of the contemporary Catholic church, this made gargoyles a perfect fit.

By the time Notre-Dame was finished in 1345, dozens of limestone gargoyles covered its exterior walls. Posing as both guardians and gutters, these creatures have a distinctive appearance, consisting of a hollow, streamlined body, a long neck, and and an expressive, animal-like head. Often, they also have feathered wings, prominent, pointed ears, and clawed limbs tucked close to their body.

Notre Dame Grotesques Notre Dame Cathedral Notre Dame Gargoyles Notre Dame Sculptures

Gargoyles on Notre-Dame (Photo: Peter Cadogan via Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 4.0)



Why this uniform appearance? According to art historian Michael Camille, the cathedral’s gargoyles look alike due to their ephemerality. “On medieval churches gargoyles rotted so quickly, if they did their job properly and carried off water, that only a century or so after they were made they had to be replaced,” Camille claims in The Gargoyles of Notre-Dame: Medievalism and the Monsters of Modernity. “Not enduring like the saints in stone carved around the doorways below but contingent creatures, often carved in cruder limestone that had a shorter life, proper gargoyles were eminently replaceable.”

Notre Dame Grotesques Notre Dame Cathedral Notre Dame Gargoyles Notre Dame Sculptures

Gargoyles on the side of Notre-Dame (Photo: Sharon Mollerus via Shutterstock)

This approach and consequent aesthetic contrasts that of the chimera, which are strikingly individual—and seemingly irreplaceable. However, unlike the gargoyles, these sculptures are not an original fixture of Notre-Dame. In fact, contrary to popular belief, they don’t even date back to the Middle Ages; they were sculpted in the 19th century.


The Famous Chimera

Notre Dame Grotesques Notre Dame Cathedral Notre Dame Gargoyles Notre Dame Sculptures

Charles Nègre, “Henri Le Secq near the ‘Stryge’ chimera,” 1853 (Photo via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

In the 1800s, Notre-Dame was in crisis. Bored of the Gothic style and embracing Baroque architecture, Parisians all but petitioned for the crumbling cathedral’s demolition.

Fortunately, French writer, playwright, and preservationist Victor Hugo sought to save it. In order to remind the public of its historic importance, he penned The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, a novel that celebrates the mystery and magnificence of the Medieval cathedral. As a result of the book’s success, there was a renewed interest in the church, leading the king to call for its refurbishment.

In 1844, architects Jean-Baptiste-Antoine Lassus and Eugène Viollet-le-Duc were commissioned to restore the aging cathedral. The duo employed a team of craftspeople who repaired existing features and added new elements, including a 750-ton spire, copper statues, and the now-famous 56 chimera.

Unlike the gargoyles, these statues do not protrude from the external walls. Instead, they line the Galerie des Chimères, a balcony that connects the two bell towers. From here, they peer over the balustrade, where they eerily keep watch over the city and adorn the cathedral with their one-of-a-kind silhouettes.

Notre-Dame’s collection of chimera includes frightening animals, fantastical hybrids, and mythical creatures. Due to their unique personas, two of the sculptures have adopted nicknames throughout the years: Wyvern, a two-legged winged dragon, and Stryga (also playfully known as “the Spitting Gargoyle”), a horned creature with his head in his hands and his tongue sticking out.

Notre Dame Grotesques Notre Dame Cathedral Notre Dame Gargoyles Notre Dame Sculptures

Wyvern (Photo: starryvoyage via Shutterstock)



Notre Dame Grotesques Notre Dame Cathedral Notre Dame Gargoyles Notre Dame Sculptures

Stryga (Photo: Savvapanf Photo via Shutterstock)

Other famous—albeit nameless—characters include a one-horned demon, a goat-human hybrid, a plucky heron, and a not-so-scary elephant.


The Grotesques Today

Today, visitors to Notre-Dame Cathedral can spot both the looming gargoyles and the perched chimera. For a better view of both genres of grotesques, curious guests can even ascend the towers and walk across the Galerie des Chimères. While this climb comprises 387 steps up two sets of spiral staircases, it will undoubtedly be worth it when you’re face-to-face with its famous dwellers.

Notre Dame Grotesques Notre Dame Cathedral Notre Dame Gargoyles Notre Dame Sculptures

Up close and personal with the chimera (Photo: S.Borisov via Shutterstock)

KCONTENTS


Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.11.03 00:52


Photographer Sets Special Cameras for 1,000-Year Exposure of Lake Tahoe

By Jessica Stewart on November 2, 2018

 

How will the Earth change over the next thousand years? That’s just one question that experimental philosopher Jonathon Keats will answer with Tahoe Timescape. Using the longest of long exposures, four of Keats’ specially developed Millennium Cameras will use a 1,000-year shutter speed to document the Tahoe Basin.


Tahoe Timelapse Project by Jonathon Keats

Pinhole view from Eagle Rock.




1천년 노출 셋팅된 카메라로 촬영된 타호 호수


다음 천년 동안 지구는 어떻게 변할 것인가? 그것은 실험 철학자 조나단 키츠가 타호 타임스케이프에게 대답할 질문이다. 긴 노출 중 가장 긴 노출을 사용하는, 특별히 개발된 4개의 키이츠 카메라가 1,000년의 셔터 속도를 사용하여 타호 분지를 기록할 것이다.


Keats first unveiled his Millennium Camera in 2015. It’s a simple copper camera with a pinhole drilled through a 24-karat plate. “This camera becomes a way for us to see ourselves from the far future, to reflect on the decisions that we make, but also it becomes a way to coalesce around a project in deep time,” Keats wrote at the time of its unveiling. “Can we, as a society, work with and around a project like this?”


Now, thanks to Tahoe Public Art, Keats is putting his invention to the test. Over the next 1,000 years, the Millennium Cameras will have their eyes on the environment, documenting every change—for better or worse—that is coming our way. Keats specifically chose the Tahoe Basin because it’s an environmentally sensitive area that is undergoing development, which he’s been witness to during his periodic visits over the past few decades.


Millenium Camera by Jonathon Keats

Millennium Camera


“Many of the challenges we face as a society today can be seen on and around Lake Tahoe,” Keats tells My Modern Met. “By bearing witness over the long term, we may not only be able to provide a record of our stewardship to future generations, but also to influence that stewardship by providing a thousand-year perspective on the impact of our present-day actions.”




In preparation for the project, Keats conducted site surveys with landscape photographer Ryland West. West documented all four vantage points by taking traditional landscape photographs as well as digital pinhole photos to give an idea of the type of imagery that could be expected. Thinking of the endgame, Keats has also booked an exhibition space for 3018—talk about planning ahead!


Informative plaques are set up by each Millennium Camera to explain Tahoe Timescape. The cameras are visible at the following locations: Heavenly Mountain Resort (South Lake Tahoe, NV/CA), Eagle Rock (Homewood, CA), Lake Tahoe Dam (Tahoe City, CA), and Sand Habor, NV.



These landscape and pinhole photos around Lake Tahoe demonstrate how the environment looks today and the type of photo compositions we may expect from the Millennium Camera.

Tahoe Timelapse Project by Jonathon Keats

View from Eagle Rock

Tahoe Timelapse Project by Jonathon Keats

View of Sand Harbor

Tahoe Timelapse Project by Jonathon Keats

Pinhole view of Sand Harbor

Tahoe Timelapse Project by Jonathon Keats

View of the Tahoe Dam

Tahoe Timelapse Project by Jonathon Keats

Pinhole view of the Tahoe Dam

Jonathon Keats: Twitter

All photos by Ryland West, courtesy of Tahoe Public Art. My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Jonathon Keats.

kcontents


Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.10.31 22:20


Amazing Winners of the 2018 Siena International Photo Awards

By Sara Barnes on October 30, 2018

 

In Cox’s Bazar, Asmat Ara looks clearly traumatized after the recent violence which took place in Myanmar, on September 6th, 2017. The previous night she had entered Tenkhali Rohingya refugee camp with her family from Kumar Khali, Myanmar Rohingya state. According to the UNHCR, more than 646,000 Rohingya refugees have fled from Myanmar since August 25th, 2017, most of them trying to cross the border to reach Bangladesh.


“Battle Victim” by K M Asad. Ukhiya, Bangladesh. SIPA Contest Photo of the Year.




The annual Siena International Photo Awards (SIPA) reveal parts of the world that go unknown to many. Now in their fourth year, the contest demonstrates an incredible range of subject matter, from amazing portraits of the animal kingdom to heart-wrenching photos of humanity to applaudable feats of architecture. The awe-inspiring pictures are in keeping with the mission of the contest. SIPA is hosted by Art Photo Travel, a non-profit organization whose mission involves “cultural initiatives aimed at spreading, promoting and enhancing art, monuments, traditions, cultures and natural beauty from all around the world.”


The 2018 competition saw more than 48,000 entries from amateur and professional photographers in 156 countries. A fraction of the submissions were selected for category awards. Using unconventional names including Fragile Ice, Animals in Their Environment, and Fascinating Faces and Characters, the section winners are awarded starting with 1° Classified, then 2° Classified, and then 3° Classified. Beyond that are the honorable mentions.




Above all of the submissions, SIPA crowned their Photo of the Year. This year’s top prize went to K M Asad for a striking portrait called Battle Victim. In it, the documentary photographer captured the tears of a young Rohingya girl after she and her family entered the Tenkhali refugee camp in Bangladesh. She looks on as others arrive, having also fled Myanmar. The emotional photo is a grave reminder of the refugee crisis.


See our selection of favorite winning photographs from 2018, below, and view all of the winners on the SIPA website.

The Siena International Photo Awards is a yearly culture and nature photo contest that selects an incredible variety of images from every corner of the globe.

SIPA Photo Contest

“Kid with Hand Crafts” by David Nam Lip Lee. Ethiopia. 1° Classified, Fascinating Faces and Characters.
In Ethiopia, the kids of the Suri tribe are being over-protected by their families. Imagine these metal handcrafts as a jail with a Suri kid locked inside. Young kids are the hope and inheritors of the Suri culture, but the overprotection will marginalize the new generation from the world.

2018 Siena International Nature Photo Contest

“Migration” by Khalid Alsabt. Desert of Dahana, Saudi Arabia. 2° Classified, The Beauty of Nature.
In the desert of Dahana, in the center of Saudi Arabia, Bedouins migrate with camels from place to place, searching for food and water. I took this picture while a group of nomads was passing us with their camels, creating beautiful shadows in a peaceful atmosphere.


2018 Siena International Photo Contest

“Game of Colors” by Anurag Kumar. Nandgaon, Uttar Pradesh, India. 2° Classified, Fragile Ice.
The Holi Festival is a yearly Indian celebration announcing the arrival of spring, with a colorful atmosphere that radiates love and happiness.

2018 Siena International Photo Contest

“Game of Colors” by Anurag Kumar. Nandgaon, Uttar Pradesh, India. 2° Classified, Fragile Ice.
The Holi Festival is a yearly Indian celebration announcing the arrival of spring, with a colorful atmosphere that radiates love and happiness.

2018 Siena International Photo Contest

“Henningsvær Football Field” by Misha De-Stroyev. Henningsvær, Lofoten Islands, Norway. 2° Classified, Architecture & Urban Spaces.
The football field of Henningsvær, in the beautiful Lofoten Islands in Norway, is considered to be one of the most amazing football fields in Europe, and maybe even in the world.



2018 Siena International Photo Contest

“Facing Reality” by Amos Nachoum. Pleneau Island, Antarctic Peninsula. 1° Classified, Animals in Their Environment.
A leopard seal got into a lagoon just before low tide. The seal was hiding, waiting to ambush young penguins as they got closer. When a penguin got close enough, the seal moved extremely fast and caught the penguin by its feet dragging it to the open water. I was following parallel to the action. The seal released the penguin twice and the terrified penguin succeeded in escaping, but the seal continued chasing after it, and on the third attempt, drowned the penguin and devoured it.


2018 Siena International Photo Contest

“Floating Market” by Sina Falker. Borneo, Indonesia. 1° Classified, Fragile Ice.
Early in the morning before sunrise up to a hundred boats meet at the colorful Lok Baintan Floating Market in Indonesia. It is one of the oldest markets in Asia where the inhabitants still trade from traditional wooden boats.


2018 Siena International Photo Contest

“Hanging in the Primary Forest” by Marco Gaiotti. Gunung Leuser National Park, Indonesia. Honorable Mention, Animals in Their Environment.
A wild Sumatran orangutan in Gunung Leuser National Park, in Northern Sumatra. This species is critically endangered according to the IUCN red list, due to habitat loss, as a consequence of palm oil exploitation and logging. Less than 3,500 orangutans still survive in the wild. We found this big male while hiking into the primary forest, and after initial mistrust, it became confident allowing me to take some wide-angle shots.

2018 Siena International Photo Contest

“El Calbuco” by Francisco Negroni. Los Ríos Region, Chile. 1° Classified, The Beauty of Nature.
This photograph was taken during a violent night eruption of the Calbuco volcano in the Lagos region, Chile. An incredible dirt storm wraps the fumarole of the erupting volcano.


2018 Siena International Photo Contest

“Reflection Pole Vault” by Ajuriaguerra Saiz Pedro Luis. Bilbao, Spain. 1° Classified, Sports in Action.
The pole vaulter makes his final jump, decisive to proclaim himself the winner of the event. The moment is captured in the reflection generated by the intense rains on the ground.

2018 Siena International Photo Contest

“Toy Houses” by Fyodor Savintsev. Arkhangelsk, Russia. 1° Classified, Architecture & Urban Spaces.
This picture of some Russian dachas near the city of Arkhangelsk is interesting thanks to the intense contrast between the colors of the houses and the white snow covering the Russian town.



2018 Siena International Nature Photo Contest

“On Guard” by Riksa Dewantara. Bromo Semeru Tengger National Park, Indonesia. 2° Classified, Journeys & Adventures.
The explosive eruption and loud rumbling of the Mt. Bromo volcano scared the horse causing it to rear up onto its hind legs.

2018 Siena International Nature Photo Contest

“Fisherman at Inle Lake” by Yinzhi Pan. Inle Lake, Myanmar. 1° Classified, Student.
This picture was captured at Inle Lake on the Shan Plateau in Myanmar. As the lake is covered with reeds and floating plants, it is difficult to row while sitting. As a result, the Intha fishermen have developed an unusual rowing style. It is amazing how people in each corner of the world find ways to adapt to nature, inspired by nature itself.


2018 SIPA Photo Award Winners

“Every Breath You Take” by Klaus Lenzen. Duesseldorf, Germany. 1° Classified, General Color.
The picture was taken from 35 individual images of swimmers at the triathlon in the Duesseldorf Media Harbour in the summer of 2017. I was able to take them from above, while the athletes crossed a pedestrian bridge capturing their very individual “breathing techniques“. I was inspired by the work of Andreas Gursky; therefore, I took the individual images with the highest possible sharpness.

2018 Siena International Nature Photo Contest

“The Wave” by Lorraine Turci. South of Drake Passage, Antarctica waters. 3° Classified, Journeys & Adventures.
In the Drake Passage, between Cape Horn and Antarctica, a 12-meter wave pounds the boat’s forecastle with its enormous splashes.

2018 Siena International Photo Contest

“Snowfall” by Matthias Hangst. Lahti, Finland. Honorable Mention, Sports in Action.
Vincent Descombes Sevoie of France competes in the Mixed Team HS100 Normal Hill Ski Jumping during the 2017 FIS Nordic World Ski Championships in Finland.


SIPA Photo Contest

“Runner” by Marcel van Balken. Arnhem, The Netherlands. 1° Classified, General Monochrome.
This photograph highlights the modern architecture of Arnhem Central Station in the Netherlands by using black and white technique and the movement of the runner in the static scene.

Siena International Photo Awards: Website | Instagram | Facebook

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Siena International Photo Awards.

KCONTENTS


Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.10.17 01:35


Stunning Photos Capture the Fiery Passion of People in the Ocean

By Sara Barnes on October 16, 2018


Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol




불타는 듯한 열정


사진작가 조앤 캐롤(Joan Carol)은 그의 강렬한 초상화를 통해서 물의 수많은 분위기를 포착한 사진을 선보였다. 그 환상적인 이미지는 빙글빙글 도는 아름다움에 빠져있는 그의 피사체들을 대상으로 한다. 모델들은 종종 서로 열정적으로 작용하지만, 캐롤은 분위기를 변화시키고 정체성과 인간의 끈기에 대한 주제를 탐구한다. 각 작품은 극적인 조명과 불포화 색상으로 시각적으로 통합된다. 이렇게 함으로써, 우리는 이 사람들이 같은 이야기의 일부이며 단지 다른 장에 불과하다는 것을 알게 된다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator


Photographer Joan Carol captures the many moods of the water in his compelling portraiture. The fantastical images feature his subjects in the sea as they are immersed in its swirling beauty. Often, the models engage passionately with one another, but Carol varies the mood and also explores themes of identity and human tenacity. Each piece is visually unified with dramatic lighting and a desaturated color palette. In doing this, we get the sense that these people are part of the same story, just different chapters.




Carol uses digital manipulation to bring his ideas to life. Sometimes, it’s subtle, such as changing the way in which the water splashes. Other times, it’s to ignite an object or to set the sea on fire. It’s in these awe-inspiring moments that we appreciate the undeniable beauty of the water and its ability to unite lovers or to offer a sense of renewal and even rebirth. And just as the tide ebbs and flows, so do the emotions present in Carol’s work.


Carol shares his photography on his popular Instagram account.


Photographer Joan Carol creates compelling fantasy portrait photography that often revolves around the swirling beauty of the ocean.

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

 

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

 

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

 

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

 

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

 

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

 

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

 

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

 

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

 

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

 

 

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

 

Fantasy Portrait Photography by Joan Carol

 

Joan Carol: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Joan Carol.

KCONTENTS


Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.10.03 13:30


Interview: Adventurous Travel Photographer Reflects on His Most Memorable Images

By Sara Barnes on September 26, 2018


A family collects shellfish as the sun sets on one of the hottest days on record, Poole Harbour, England.



미지의 세계 전통적인 관습 다큐멘터리 사진들


  영국의 사진작가 앤드류 뉴니는 사람들에게 알려지지 않은 곳인 네팔, 몽고, 인도네시아의 외딴 지역을 여행하면서, 그들의 문화에 대한 다큐멘터리 스타일의 사진들을 촬영했다. 


뉴디는 그들의 전통적인 관습을 기록하면서 그들과 함께 몇 주 동안 생활한다. 그 결과는 우리 자신의 생활방식과 매우 다른 순간적인 모습을 보여주는 사려깊은 사진들이다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator


British photographer Andrew Newey reveals parts of the world that go unknown to many of us. Traveling to remote locales of Nepal, Mongolia, and Indonesia, he captures compelling documentary style photography of cultures that exist outside of our technology-obsessed sphere. Newey ingratiates himself with his subjects and will spend weeks living with them, documenting their traditional practices along the way. The results are thoughtful photographs that provide us a momentary glimpse into lifestyles that vastly differ from our own.




One of Newey’s most memorable series took him to central Nepal where he stayed for two weeks with the Gurung tribespeople as they hunted honey. His incredible images showcase the precarious nature of this practice, which has the hunters perched on rope ladders 200 feet in the air using tangos (long sticks) to collect honeycombs from the Himalayan cliffside. But he hasn’t stopped with this ambitious series. Newey has since trekked to the largest coal mine in India and revisited Nepal, among other adventures.


We were honored to speak with Newey about his work and what he’s done over the past several years. Scroll down to read our exclusive interview and learn more about his travels—including three of his most memorable photographs. To keep up with where he goes next, you can follow him on Instagram.


Documentary Photography by Andrew Newey

Honey hunter collecting wild Himalayan honey, Kaski region, Nepal.

When we last featured your work, you were documenting honey hunters in Nepal. What have you been working on since then?

Since the honey hunters, I have spent time living with the Dogon people in Mali, leading a winter photo expedition in Mongolia where purely by chance we came across a very rare traditional migration using wooden carts, documenting the I’daan people collecting edible bird’s nests from the roof of a 500ft cave in Borneo, visiting the largest coal mine in India that has been burning underground for about 100 years, spending considerable time in Nepal firstly living with the Raute nomads, and more recently hunting for wild ingredients in the Himalayan region. In 2016, I began the most important and fulfilling journey in my life so far; fatherhood.

Documentary Photography by Andrew Newey

Raute nomads keeping warm around a campfire, Surkhet region, Nepal.

How do you discover your photographic subjects?

I discover potential photographic subject matter/stories from a variety of sources; people giving me tip-offs which I really appreciate, reading books, watching documentaries which is how I found out about the honey hunters in Nepal, suggestions from magazine Editors, and of course the most popular tool being the internet. If something looks or sounds interesting then I will carry out weeks, maybe months of research, which mostly involves making sure that the subject has not been covered too much by other photographers. Otherwise, editors will not be so interested in publishing the work produced and you also run the risk of being labeled a plagiarist.

One thing that really infuriates me is when a well-known photographer with a large social media following publicly mocks another for “copying” their photo or story ideas. Firstly, no photographer can “copyright” a subject matter or country or region; and secondly, if your photography has inspired someone else to the same place, then surely that is a good thing?!

I think that many photographers out there are finding it increasingly difficult to find a subject matter/story that is interesting, photogenic, AND unique. Of course the honey hunters story had already been done back in the late ‘70’s by Eric Valli for Nat Geo, however, I really wanted to shoot it too for several reasons and felt confident of capturing a different set of photos which I think I managed to do to a reasonable extent.

Documentary Photography by Andrew Newey

A woman scavenging coal from the largest coalmine in India.

You mention that one of your favorite travel destinations is Mongolia. What draws you to the country?

Mongolia is one of my favorite countries because it offers the chance to step back in time to a simpler, age-old way of life. Around 25% of the population are still truly nomadic, moving around two to four times a year depending on the area and weather. Around 25% are semi-nomadic, moving from villages at the end of winter to the vast open Steppe to find new pasture for their livestock. These nomad families are extremely friendly and welcoming, whose relentless sense of hospitality can at times be overwhelming. As a travel destination, it is a special place for those seeking adventure, traditional culture and unrivaled hospitality offered by nomad families. It is a magical place to visit and remains one of the last unspoiled travel destinations in Asia.

What do you hope to showcase in Mongolia?

From my many trips there, I hope to showcase the lives of the nomadic people, the culture and traditions, the epic, endless landscapes of this still lesser-known destination.

Documentary Photography by Andrew Newey

Young Mentawai girl playing with a Machete, Siberut Island, Indonesia.

What is the most memorable photo (or photos) you’ve ever taken?

Well, that’s a tough one – we could be here all day! There are a few that stick in my mind for various reasons…

  • Young Mentawai girl playing with a machete – The first night sleeping in a wooden longhouse in the jungle the 18-month-old did her business through a hole in the floor, after which the pet dog proceeded to lick the bottom clean. Straight after she took a whopping great homemade cigarette from her dad’s mouth and took a few puffs. Unfortunately because we were in our sleeping bags ready to go to sleep, I was not able to get my camera in time, however, the image is still very much etched in my mind! The next morning I awoke to see her playing with a machete which I was able to capture. How can anyone not find all that memorable?!
  • The Honey Hunter in Nepal – A particularly memorable shoot because those guys were so friendly, hospitable, and trusting to allow me to join them for such an ancient tradition. Also, being attacked by thousands of giant angry bees made it incredibly hard to capture those photos. Together with the noise and smell (of the bee excrement), it is a memory that will never fade.
  • Traditional migration in Mongolia – For many years now I have been fascinated by nomads and their lifestyle. During a photo expedition I was leading in Mongolia a couple of years ago we came across a very rare traditional migration using wooden carts, purely by chance. It was such a memorable sight and experience. Our guide and driver who had 12 and 20 years experience respectively were just as shocked as the rest of us have never seen anything like it before.
Documentary Photography by Andrew Newey

A nomad family migrating to their summer camp, Arkhangai region, Mongolia.

Is there an overall message that you hope to convey with your images?

Thanks for saving the best till last—I never like these kinds of questions! I guess there is, and it’s quite simple to encourage and inspire others to get out there and experience the beauty of our planet and its people for themselves. The media bombards us with depressing images and stories on a daily basis, which is fine because most of them are important and need to be told. However, I personally want to seek out the good in humanity, not the bad, and make a conscious effort to document people, environments, landscapes that evoke happy and positive emotions, although ultimately the viewer is free to take away whatever message that they want.

Documentary Photography by Andrew Newey

A Jewish elder praying in the Western Wall Library, Jerusalem, Israel.

Documentary Photography by Andrew Newey

An orthodox priest removes burnt candles in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Israel.

Documentary Photography by Andrew Newey

The daily procession of Orthodox priests in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Israel.

Andrew Newey: Website | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos and captions by Andrew Newey.

KCONTENTS



Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.09.20 00:27


This Image of the Total Eclipse Is Being Called “History’s Most Amazing Photo”


By Jessica Stewart on September 14, 2018


Over 200 million Americans watched the total solar eclipse in August 2017, but no one had a better view than photographer Jon Carmichael. He spent years plotting how he could capture the total eclipse in a unique way, eventually combining his passions for photography, astronomy, and flight.


 

Total Eclipse Photo by Jon Carmichael


 

역사상 가장 놀랄만한 개기식 사진들


2017년 8월 2억 명이 넘는 미국인들이 일식을 지켜봤지만 사진작가 존 카마이클보다 더 나은 시각을 가진 사람은 없었다. 그는 자신이 어떻게 일식을 독특한 방법으로 포착할 수 있는지, 결국 사진, 천문학, 비행에 대한 열정을 결합시킬 수 있는지를 계획하면서 수년을 보냈다.


"만약 내가 충분히 높이 올라간다면, 달의 그림자가 지구 표면을 가로질러 2,000mph로 움직이는 것을 실제로 볼 수 있을까? 그것이 내가 정말 보고 싶었던 것이다."라고 카마이클이 나의 모던 메이트에게 말한다. 사진작가로서, 저는 정말 이 아름다운 순간을 독특한 관점에서 포착할 수 있을까 생각했습니다. 이는 역사상 가장 사진 찍힌 순간이었기 때문에 전문 사진작가로서 많은 압박감을 받고 있습니다." 일식 경로를 주의 깊게 연구함으로써, 이 사진작가는 사우스웨스트 항공이 포틀랜드에서 세인트 루이스까지 비행하는 것을 발견했고, 이 비행은 이 행사를 보기 위한 완벽한 위치에 놓이게 될 것이다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator

edited by kcontents


“I wondered, if I got up high enough, could I actually see the moon's shadow move across the Earth's surface at 2,000 mph? That's what I really wanted to see,” Carmichael tells My Modern Met. “And as a photographer, I wondered, can I actually capture this beautiful fleeting moment in our country from a unique perspective? This was the most photographed moment in history, so as a professional photographer that's a lot of pressure.” By studying the eclipse path carefully, the photographer realized that Southwest Airlines runs a flight from Portland to St. Louis that would put him in the perfect position to view the event.



Taking a once in a lifetime chance, Carmichael purchased a ticket and hoped that he'd get a window seat. Since Southwest doesn't have pre-assigned seats, he'd even prepared himself to bribe someone to give up their window position if necessary. Luckily, it didn't come to that. When he explained his mission to the Southwest flight crew, not only did they ensure he'd get a great seat, but the captain actually went outside the plane to clean the window for a crystal clear shot. During the flight itself, the pilots circled a few times to provide all passengers with a spectacular view.


When it came time for the moment of totality, Carmichael was ready. He shot over 1,200 photos in two minutes and managed to perfectly capture the total eclipse over Snake River. It's an image that Inc. calls “history's most amazing photo.” A 10-foot laser-crystal c-print of 108 now hangs in Twitter's New York offices.


So how did it feel to take the photo of his dreams? “In photography, it's very rare for something you envision to manifest itself, let alone to turn out even better than you had hoped. I had visualized this moment for years, risked a lot flying across the country on the off-chance this could work out, and hadn't slept in days leading up to this moment. So after I looked through all the photographs, I put my camera away, took a deep breath, and celebrated by ordering a drink and had a giant smile for the rest of the flight. I had never felt more relieved, grateful, and excited in my life. Against all odds, it came together. It felt meant to be—and literally changed my life.”


Carmichael spent one year processing the images into a giant photographic-mosaic titled 108. Limited edition prints are now available for purchase via the photographer's website.


Photographer Jon Carmichael took a Southwest flight during the Great American Eclipse to get the perfect photo from his seat.

Jon Carmichael - Behind the Scenes of Total Eclipse Photo

Once he explained his mission to the flight crew, the captain cleaned his window to ensure he'd have a crystal clear shot.

Jon Carmichael - Behind the Scenes of Total Eclipse Photo

From his window seat, Carmichael had the perfect view and was able to take 1,200 photos during the eclipse.


Jon Carmichael - Behind the Scenes of Total Eclipse Photo


Watch this video from Southwest Airlines to learn more about Carmichael's vision.

Jon Carmichael: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Jon Carmichael.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.09.14 00:41


Dynamic Underwater Photos Look Like Dramatic Baroque Paintings

By Kelly Richman-Abdou on September 7, 2018


Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings


Art from the Baroque period is known for its exquisite compositions and ethereal use of light. While it may seem as if oil paints are the only medium that can achieve this aesthetic, visual artist Christy Lee Rogers proves that underwater photography can be just as powerful in her dynamic series, Muses.


크리스티 리 로저스(Christy Lee Rogers) 바로크 수중사진 '뮤즈'


바로크 시대의 예술품은 정교한 구성과 빛의 이격적인 사용으로 유명하다. 오일 페인트가 이 미관을 성취할 수 있는 유일한 매체인 것처럼 보일 수도 있지만, 시각적 예술가 크리스티 리 로저스(Christy Lee Rogers)는 수중 사진이 그녀의 역동적인 시리즈인 Muses에서만큼 강력할 수 있다는 것을 알려줍니다.





Featuring swirls of intertwined figures and flowing drapery, each striking photograph looks like a 17th-century painting come to life. Specifically, Muses borrows traits from Baroque masters, including Caravaggio's contrasts between light and shadow, Gentileschi's focus on movement, and Rubens' rich color palette. Unlike the work of these artists, however, Rogers' scenes don't take place in opulent interiors or mythological landscapes. Instead, they're set entirely underwater.


Each photo featured in Muses was shot at night in an illuminated pool. This unique setup gives the photographs their soft, brushstroke-like quality and allows Rogers to literally bathe her subjects in light as they twist and tumble through the water.


This concept of free-floating was inspired by events in Rogers' own life. After experiencing multiple losses in a short period of time, she decided she needed to fully dive in to her practice—a decision that eventually sparked the series. “Any day could be my last, and I knew I would not forgive myself if I didn’t do everything I was capable of doing now,” she told PHOTOFAIRS. “So this was at the core of Muses; the inspiration that was pushing me forward.”


Christy Lee Rogers' striking underwater photography series, Muses, evokes the drama and dynamism of Baroque paintings.

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings
Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings
Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings
Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings
Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

Due to the effects of the water, the photographs look like they are rendered in oil paints.

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

Some even look like abstract details of brushwork.

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

Rogers achieves this aesthetic by shooting in swimming pools at night.

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

This is responsible for the underwater photos' eye-catching, luminous aesthetic.

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

 

Muses Christy Lee Rogers Underwater Photography Underwater Photos Baroque Characteristics Baroque Paintings

Christy Lee Rogers: Website | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | Behance | YouTube

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Christy Lee Rogers.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.09.13 23:33
people2018.09.05 01:18


Celebrities are matched with some VERY unflattering doppelgangers by new Google Art Selfie app that twins faces to famous paintings (so which work of art do YOU look like?)




Arts and Culture app is free to download on Google Play and Apple app Stores

It uses AI and machine learning to match a picture of a face to a painting

The app matched Tom Hiddleston to a portrait of Spain's ruler King Philip II

Olivia Colman was matched with 19th century Dutch painter Gerrit Jan Michaelis


오늘 전세계에서 오픈한 구글의 아트 셀피 어플은 영화와 TV 스타들 그리고 

전 총리의 부인과 유명한 그림들의 얼굴과 매치시켰다.


아츠앤컬처 어플은 구글 플레이와 애플스토어에서 무료로 다운받을 수 있다.

그림의 얼굴과 매치시키기 위해 AI와 머신 러닝을 사용한다.


예로 톰 히들스톤과 스페인왕 필립2세와 얼굴을 매치시켰다.

올리비아 콜먼은 19세기 네덜란드 화가 게리 잔 미하엘리스와 매치시켰다



By EMILY KENT SMITH MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY REPORTER FOR THE DAILY MAIL

PUBLISHED: 10:00 BST, 4 September 2018 | UPDATED: 11:13 BST, 4 September 2018


It's worth doing a double take when you look at these images...


They are photos of Tom Hiddleston, Olivia Colman and Samantha Cameron along with portraits from the art world supposed to be their spitting images.


But the comparisons are not entirely flattering.


Google's Arts Selfie, which launches worldwide today, matched the film and TV stars and former prime minister's wife with paintings.


View Full Text

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6129291/Celebrities-matched-unflattering-doppelgangers-new-Google-Art-Selfie-app.html


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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.09.01 01:18


Traveling Photographer Captures the Beautiful Unspoiled Landscape of Kyrgyzstan

By Jessica Stewart on August 28, 2018



 

키르기스스탄의 천혜의 경관 


숙련된 풍경 사진작가로서, 알버트 드로스는 많은 놀라운 풍경을 보아왔지만, 키르기스스탄 3주간의 여행 동안 그가 발견한 것은 경탄 그 자체였다.


육지로 둘러싸인 중앙아시아 국가는 고대 실크로드에 위치하고 있으며, 경관에 엄청난 다양성을 가지고 있다. 톈산까지의 산간지역은 국토의 80%를 차지하고 있는 반면 키르기스스탄은 빛 공해의 영향을 받지 않는 맑은 하늘뿐 아니라 인상적인 계곡과 바닥으로 가득 차 있다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator



Wild horses standing in front of the huge snow capped peaks in the Sary-Jaz valley on the border of Kyrgyzstan and China.




As a skilled landscape photographer, Albert Dros has seen a lot of stunning landscapes, but nothing prepared him for the beauty he would find during a 3-week trip to Kyrgyzstan. The landlocked Central Asian country, located along the ancient Silk Road, has an incredible variety to its landscape. While the mountainous region to Tian Shan covers 80% of the country, Kyrgyzstan is also filled with impressive valleys and basins, as well as a clear sky untouched by light pollution.


For Dros, Kyrgyzstan was paradise. “As a photographer and nature lover, you know that feeling when you see that untouched beauty? Crazy mountains with open valleys? It triggers you somehow. That’s what Kyrgyzstan did to me,” Dros writes. The unspoiled landscape makes for sweeping views, with the occasional yurt or group of wild horses entering the frame. Though the mountains are already visible when in the capital city of Bishkek, the real adventure begins when Dros explores regions inhabited by nomadic shepherds.


“With some effort (driving ‘bad’ roads and hiking steep paths) you’ll be able to see some of the most beautiful untouched nature you’ve ever seen. Endless valleys with huge mountains around you, crystal clear turquoise lakes, wild eagles, canyons, you name it. This country has it all. I was surprised by its variety of landscapes in a rather small area. Just a few hours driving would bring me from snowcapped mountains to landscapes that looked like the moon with red canyons and unearthly textures.”


Dros was able to employ all his landscape photography secrets and capture the unspoiled beauty of a country few tourists venture to see. The results are a moving tribute to the power to nature.




Landscape photographer Albert Dros spent three weeks photographing the unspoiled beauty of Kyrgyzstan.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

A green valley with wild horses and a view on Peak Yeltsin. This is what Kyrgyzstan is about.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

An intimate shot of a green hill. Kyrgyzstan has many opportunities for intimate shots as it has beautiful rocks and hills everywhere around.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

A wide open valley with glacial rivers coming from the mountains protecting the valley. These mountains are often 5000m+ (16400ft+). This is a shot of the Barskoon Valley. It took a 4000m (13000ft) road pass to get here.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

Twilight before the sun comes up. Standing at one of the crazy canyons in Kyrgyzstan that look like they’re coming straight from the moon.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

Ala-Kul lake, a magical crystal clear lake turquoise-colored lake located at an altitude close to 4000m. This lake requires a steep 5 hour hike at high altitudes to get to.

Photo of Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

These kind of scenes are common yet impressive to see in Kyrgyzstan. Hundreds of animals covering the empty lands.

Kyrgyzstan Landscape Photography by Albert Dros

An aerial panorama of a part of the Barksoon Valley. You can see all the rivers coming from the glaciers of the mountains into lakes. This valley itself is already at 4000m (13000ft) with the surrounding mountains much higher.

Photo of Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

An eagle flying over the tops of the Ala-Archa mountains. Unique light hitting inside of the mountain from reflecting onto the clouds.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

Camping at the Sary-Jaz valley on the border of Kyrgyzstan and China. Zero light pollution makes the skies so bright. We used this old Soviet bus as transport. Not much comfort but very reliable, they said. This thing could drive off road up to mountains. It was called ‘the pill’ as according to the locals it looked like a pill.

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

You can always find different wildflowers in the mountains in Kyrgyzstan. This was at an altitude of 4000m (13000ft) in the Barskoon Valley. Glaciers, lakes, and mountains everywhere around.

The Tian Shan mountain range covers 80% of the country, with peaks reaching over 7000 meters (23,000 feet).

Kyrgyzstan Travel Photography by Albert Dros

Standing in front just another Glacier at the Sary Jaz Valley which is located on the border of Kyrgyzstan and China. This area requires a permit. It’s an amazing valley surrounded by snowcapped mountains of the Tian Shan range which has peaks over 7000m (23000ft).

Photo of Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

Standing in front of Peak Karakol. A very scenic peak popular among mountain climbers. It has an altitude of 5200m (17000ft).

Photo of Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

You’ll find this kind of landscapes next to a lot of roads. Like they’re carefully carved out of mountains. Interesting hills against blue skies form a beautiful sight.

Kyrgyzstan Landscape Photography by Albert Dros

A top down view from the patterns of Skazka Canyon (fairy tale canyon).

Kyrgyzstan Landscape Photography by Albert Dros

A photo of the lunar eclipse in 2018 with Mars right under it and the visible milky way. Notice my girlfriend standing there enjoying the night sky.

Kyrgyzstan Landscape Photography by Albert Dros

Sunrise at Skazka canyon, which means fairy tale canyon. Does this remind you of Mars?

Many people are shepherds living a nomadic lifestyle, with families living in yurts.

Kyrgyzstan Photo by Albert Dros

A kid of the local family enjoying the sunset at Song-Kul, a wide open valley at a huge lake at an altitude of 3000m (9800ft). The locals are living like nomads here without any luxury. Think about growing up here.

Photo of Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

Hundreds of sheep moved on the hills right before a storm hit.

Yurt in Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

Kids standing in the opening of their Yurt. They stay here in the summer months learning to take care of the cattle from when they’re young.

Kyrgyzstan Photo by Albert Dros

Mars-like landscapes in a canyon called Skazka Canyon which means ‘fairytale canyon’. Walking around here is really unreal.

Kyrgyzstan Landscape Photography by Albert Dros

An open view of the scenic Karakol Peak which lies at the end of Karakol Valley. You can see how the glacier mounts into streams and rivers. An impressive sight.

Kyrgyzstan Landscape Photography by Albert Dros

A horse with a mountain backdrop in the Song-Kul area. Look closely and you can see lots of animals and yurts in the background.

Photo of Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

Aerial shot of textures from just another canyon in Kyrgyzstan.

Yurt in Kyrgyzstan by Albert Dros

The night sky of Kyrgyzstan is unpolluted. We stayed at this yurt. Looking at the beautiful night sky was a joy.

Albert Dros: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos Albert Dros.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.08.26 00:51


Cinematic Portraits of a Young Kate Moss and Other Celebrities

By Jessica Stewart on August 23, 2018


With a career spanning 25 years, celebrity and fashion photographer Stephanie Pfriender Stylander has immortalized some of the greatest faces of our generation. From Kate Moss and Keith Richards to Nicole Kidman and Heath Ledger, her portraits have graced the pages of Harper's Bazaar Uomo, Glamour, Entertainment Weekly, and GQ. Her new book, The Untamed Eye, celebrates the best of her work from 1990 to 2006, paying homage to her instantly recognizable, gritty style.


Kate Moss and Marcus Schenkenberg Harper’s Bazaar Uomo, New York City, 1992



25년 캐리어의 패션 사진작가 '스테파니 프렌더 스타일랜더'


케이트 모스와 키스 리차드에서 니콜 키드먼과 히스 레저까지,


25년이라는 긴 경력을 가진 유명인사이자 패션 사진작가 스테파니 피렌더 스티랜더는 우리 세대에서 가장 위대한 인물 중 몇 명을 불멸의 사진을 남겼다. 케이트 모스와 키스 리차드에서 니콜 키드먼과 히스 레저까지, 그녀의 초상화는 하퍼의 바자르 우모, 글래머, 엔터테인먼트 위클리, GQ의 페이지를 장식했다. 그녀의 새 책인 "The Undamed Eye"는 1990년부터 2006년까지 그녀의 작품 중 최고의 작품을 기념하며, 즉시 알아볼 수 있고 고상한 스타일에 경의를 표한다.


Shooting entirely on film, Pfriender Stylander creates a narrative within each image, her cinematic style matching perfectly with the models, actors, and musicians she immortalizes. It's as though they are friends role-playing, with Pfriender Stylander directing the action behind the lens. The relaxed dynamic she creates translates to iconic portraits.



The energetic spontaneity of her photos was a product of the time, something Pfriender Stylander remembers when thinking about shooting in the 1990s. “We were all on the road, there was a fantastic restlessness, we were young and in need of expression,” she recalls. “The great fashion and creative directors let you roam, they gave you twenty pages to express your vision—it was a complete creative playground where we could be rebellious, and the word compromise was not spoken, not even thought about.”


Inspired by Italian Neorealism and the French New Wave, Pfriender Stylander has amassed a body of work that speaks for itself. Over 130 photographs spread across the pages of The Untamed Eye tell not only the story of Pfriender Stylander's career, but work as a time capsule for immortalizing this heady moment in history.


The Untamed Eye, published by MW Editions, will be available in the U.S. starting September 25, 2018. To celebrate the release, the author will be conducting signings in New York on September 12 at Staley-Wise Gallery and October 15 at Soho House/Ludlow House. An accompanying exhibition will be on show in Paris at Galerie de l'Instant from September 10 to November 28, 2018.


Fashion and celebrity photographer Stephanie Pfriender Stylander has spent 25 years capturing the iconic faces of the 20th century.

Nicole Kidman for Entertainment Weekly, Los Angeles, 1995

Heath Ledger by Stephanie Pfriender Stylander

Heath Ledger for Premiere, New York City, 2000

Keith Richards by Stephanie Pfriender Stylander

Keith Richards for British GQ, New York City, 1993

Kate Moss and Marcus Schenkenberg by Stephanie Pfriender Stylander

Kate Moss and Marcus Schenkenberg, Harper’s Bazaar Uomo, New York City, 1992

The Untamed Eye gathers her best celebrity and fashion photographs taken from 1990 to 2006.

Mickey Rourke by Stephanie Pfriender Stylander

Mickey Rourke for Entertainment Weekly, New York City, 1995

Kate Moss and Marcus Schenkenberg by Stephanie Pfriender Stylander

Kate Moss and Marcus Schenkenberg for Harper’s Bazaar Uomo, New York City, 1992

Antonio Banderas by Stephanie Pfriender Stylander

Antonio Banderas for Entertainment Weekly, Wilmington, 1995

Lenny Kravitz by Stephanie Pfriender Stylander

Lenny Kravitz for Code, New York City, 2001

Stephanie Pfriender Stylander Photographer

Roumina and Luca Vellani for British GQ, Rome, 1993

Fashion Photography by Stephanie Pfriender Stylander

Marie-Sophie Wilson for French Glamour, Marseille, 1991

Kate Moss and Marcus Schenkenberg by Stephanie Pfriender Stylander

Kate Moss and Marcus Schenkenberg, Harper’s Bazaar Uomo, New York City, 1992

Stephanie Pfriender Stylander - Untamed Eye

Kate Moss, Harper’s Bazaar Uomo, 1992

Stephanie Pfriender Stylander: Website | Instagram

All images are copyright Stephanie Pfriender Stylander from the book “The Untamed Eye” published by MW Editions. My Modern Met granted permission to use photos.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.08.20 22:32


8 Real-Life Locations of Famous Paintings You Can Visit Today

By Kelly Richman-Abdou on August 19, 2018

 

Have you ever wanted to step inside a work of art? Though this may feel like a pipe dream for many, the settings of some of the most famous modern masterpieces exist in real life—and even welcome visitors.



8개소의 실제 장소와 일치하는 유명화가의 그림들 


프랑스 남부 지역의 몽상적인 남부의 한 카페에서 오하이오주의 절제된 별장에 이르기까지, 이 장소들은 빈센트 반 고흐, 그랜트 우드, 클로드 모네, 에드바르트 뭉치를 포함한 세계에서 가장 상징적인 예술가들에게 영감을 주었다. 현대 미술 애호가들이 멀리 떨어져 있지만 친숙한 장소들을 방문함으로써, 박물관들의 벽과 미술 역사책들 밖에서 그들이 가장 좋아하는 그림들을 경험할 수 있다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator


From a cafe in the dreamy south of France to an understated cottage in Ohio, these locations have inspired some of the world's most iconic artists, including Vincent van Gogh, Grant Wood, Claude Monet, and Edvard Munch. By visiting these far-away yet familiar sites, modern art lovers can experience their favorite paintings outside of the walls of museums and the pages of art history books.


Explore some of the most well-known works of art with this selection of must-see sites.


Le Café La Nuit (Café Terrace at Night by Vincent van Gogh)

In 1888, Post-Impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh visited Arles, a colorful city in the south of France. Here, he developed his distinctive style and completed some of his most well-known paintings, including Café Terrace at Night.


Featuring a glowing cafe set against the artist's signature starry sky, the painting portrays a September evening in the Place du Forum, a square in the center of the city. “On the terrace,” Van Gogh wrote in a letter to his sister, “there are little figures of people drinking. A huge yellow lantern lights the terrace, the façade, the pavement, and even projects light over the cobblestones of the street, which takes on a violet-pink tinge.”


Van Gogh painted this piece en plein air, or “outside.” Today, you can stand in the very spot where he set up his easel, located just next to the familiar yellow awning of the aptly renamed Le Café La Nuit.


Settings of Famous Paintings Arles Van Gogh


Vincent Van Gogh, “Café Terrace at Night” (1888) (Photo via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

Settings of Famous Paintings Arles Van Gogh

Photo: Kelly Richman-Abdou / My Modern Met

Atelier Cézanne (Series of Still Life Paintings by Paul Cézanne)

Much like fellow Post-Impressionist Van Gogh, painter Paul Cézanne found ample inspiration in the idyllic south of France. Unlike the Dutch artist, however, Cézanne was born and raised in the area, with Aix-en-Provence serving as his home base for most of his life.

Here, Cézanne converted an old farmhouse into a sunny studio. In this atelier, he completed several famous paintings, including his charming Still Life with Plaster Cupid. 

Today, visitors to the Aix-en-Provence area can stop by his studio, which still houses the artist's original furniture, painting supplies, and still life props. Nestled in the hills, it is no wonder this location appealed to the artist, who noted that he “can work better there than in the city.” 

Settings of Famous Paintings Cezanne Studio

Paul Cézanne, “Still Life with Plaster Cupid” (ca. 1890s) (Photo: Nationalmuseum via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

Settings of Famous Paintings Cezanne Studio

Photo: Kelly Richman-Abdou / My Modern Met

View from Terrain des Peintres in Provence (Mount Saint Victoire Series by Paul Cézanne)

Between 1882 and 1906, Cézanne completed at least 30 paintings of Mount Saint Victoire, a mountain range in Provence. In this series, the artist famously experimented with color, composition, and brushstroke, making it one of the most significant projects of his career.

Most of these pieces were painted from a look-out point located a short distance from his studio. Known today as the Terrain des Peintres, this stunning vista is accessible by a special “Cézanne Trail,” allowing visitors to quite literally follow in the footsteps of the iconic artist.

Settings of Famous Paintings Mount St Victoria

Paul Cézanne, “Mount Saint Victoire” (ca. 1890) (Photo: Google Arts & Culture via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

La Montagne Sainte-Victoire vue depuis Ventabren

Mount Saint Victoire

Monet's Garden in Giverny (The Water Lilies and Japanese Bridge Series by Claude Monet)

Impressionist Claude Monet moved to a house in Giverny, a commune in northern France, in 1883. It is here that the Impressionist artist created and cultivated his “most beautiful masterpiece”: a Japanese-inspired garden.

Featuring weeping willow trees, year-round blooms, and an aquatic-flower pond as its centerpiece, this manicured plot of land inspired some of Monet's most famous series, including the 250-piece Water Lilies and 12 paintings of his green Japanese footbridge. “I work at my garden all the time and with love,” Monet famously said. “What I need most are flowers, always. My heart is forever in Giverny.”

Today, the artist's beloved garden—as well as his home, decorated with an impressive collection of Japanese woodblock prints—is a popular tourist destination, boasting over 500,000 visitors each year.

Settings of Famous Paintings Monet Giverny

Claude Monet, “Water Lilies and Japanese Bridge” (ca. 1897 and 1899) (Photo: The Athenaeum via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)


Claude Monet Garden, Giverny, France

Monet's garden in Giverny, France

The Palace of Westminster (Houses of Parliament Series by Claude Monet)

During his time in Giverny, Monet made frequent trips to London. Here, he painted 25 studies of the Palace of Westminster that experimentally explored the sky's changing color and its consequent reflections on the River Thames—an artistic task that proved to be his “day-long obsession, joy, and torment.”

Monet is believed to have completed these pieces from a second-floor terrace of St. Thomas Hospital. While viewing the glistening Houses of Parliament from this exact location may prove difficult today, a stroll along the river's banks and bridges offers nearly identical views.

Settings of Famous Paintings Monet Houses of Parliament

Claude Monet, “The Houses of Parliament, Sunset” (1903) (Photo: Postdlf via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

Settings of Famous Paintings Monet Houses of Parliament

Parliament at sunset (Photo: poludziber via Shutterstock)

Maison Fournaise (Luncheon of the Boating Party by Pierre-Auguste Renoir)

Luncheon of the Boating Party is one of Pierre-Auguste Renoir's most famous works. Initially exhibited at the Seventh Impressionist Exhibition in 1882, the large-scale painting  has been praised for centuries, making its setting—the Maison Fournaise, a restaurant on Chatou Island—a popular destination for dedicated fans of Impressionism.

Situated just outside of Paris, the Maison Fournaise offered boat rentals and scenic dining in the late 19th century. During this time, Renoir and other French painters regularly visited the establishment, as evident in the Luncheon of the Boating Party.

While the restaurant closed its doors in 1906, it reopened in 1990. Today, Maison Fournaise remains in business, inviting you to “relive the Impressionist joys” as you dine on its famous riverside balcony.

Settings of Famous Paintings Monet Houses of Parliament

Pierre-Auguste Renoir “Luncheon of the Boating Party” (1880-1881) (Photo: The Phillips Collection via Google Arts & Culture Public Domain)

Maison Fournaise (1860), Chatou (78)

Maison Fournaise in Chatou

Valhallvegen Road (The Scream Series by Edvard Munch)

From 1893 through 1910, Norwegian printmaker and painter Edvard Munch created his well-known series, The Scream. Composed of four works on cardboard and board, this collection stars a shrieking figure as its subject. While medium, color palette, and attention to detail vary from piece-to-piece, each features the same setting: a bridge spanning a blue body of water, set against a dusky sky.

This now-famous scenery was inspired by one of Munch's sunset strolls, as he described in his diary: “One evening I was walking along a path, the city was on one side and the fjord below. I felt tired and ill. I stopped and looked out over the fjord—the sun was setting, and the clouds turning blood red. I sensed a scream passing through nature; it seemed to me that I heard the scream. I painted this picture, painted the clouds as actual blood. The color shrieked. This became The Scream.

The path described by Munch is believed to be Valhallvegen Road, an overlook situated on Oslo's Ekeberg Hill.

Settings of Famous Paintings The Scream Edvard Munch

Edvard Munch, “The Scream” (1893) (Photo: National Gallery of Norway via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

Skrik gjerde i Valhallveien

Valhallvegen Road in Oslo, Norway

Dibble House (American Gothicby Grant Wood)

In 1930, artist Grant Wood painted American Gothic, one of the most recognizable modernist works.

The piece shows a morose man and woman standing before a small, white, and “very paintable” house with an eye-catching neo-Gothic window. While believed by many to be a couple (namely, a farmer and his wife), the figures are actually modeled after Wood's sister and dentist.

Today, fans of the painting can visit the Dibble House (a name inspired by the quaint cottage's first owner, Charles Dibble), which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Located in Eldon, Ohio, the house now has a museum and visitor center, which even provides props for American Gothic-inspired photo shoots!

Settings of Famous Paintings American Gothic Grant Wood

Grant Wood, “American Gothic” (1930) (Photo: Google Arts & Culture via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

Settings of Famous Paintings American Gothic Grant Wood

American Gothic house in Eldon, Iowa (Photo: Scott Cornell via Shutterstock)

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.08.11 11:26


Pasta Chef Handcrafts Rainbow-Colored Noodles Using All-Natural Ingredients

By Sara Barnes on August 7, 2018


Pasta powerhouse Linda Miller Nicholson reimagines the likes of bowtie, ravioli, and tortellini in the most colorful of ways. She handcrafts the variety of mouth-watering rainbow pasta from scratch and uses plant-based ingredients to transform the dough into a full spectrum of unconventional hues. The result, coupled with Nicholson’s penchant for patterns, is a fresh order of pasta that looks almost too good to eat. They are beautifully arranged and so vibrant that they double as works of art.


This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, My Modern Met may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more info.


 

파스타 쉐프의 수제 레이보우 누들 


파사 쉐프 린다 밀러 니콜슨은 가장 다양한 방법으로 나비, 라비올리, 토르텔리니 같은 것들을 상상한다. 


그녀는 입에 침이 고이는 다양한 무지개 파스타를 처음부터 손질하고 식물성 재료를 사용하여 반죽을 완전히 색다른 맛으로 변형시킨다. 그 결과는 니컬슨의 패턴에 대한 열성과 조합을 이루어, 먹기에 너무 좋아 보이는 파스타의 새로운 모습을 보여주고 있다. 


그것들은 아름답게 배열되어 있고 매우 활기차서 예술작품처럼 보인다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Chul Hwang, conpaper editor, curator



How does Nicholson make her pasta so colorful? It’s thanks to the hues found in nature; butterfly pea flowers give the dough a blue hue while beets turn it purple. Tumeric and parsley make the pasta appear yellow and green, respectively. To create her collection of complex patterns, she uses special tools—some which she developed herself— and layers colors and textures. Eventually, they are flattened and then rolled, twisted, or filled into her desired shapes.


Because Nicholson is a one-woman show, she does not sell her pasta commercially. And although it’s much sought after, she doesn’t take dinner guests, either. “It probably goes without saying at this point,” she writes, “but I get asked at least once a day… I’m very sorry but I don’t take dinner reservations.”


If you’re itching to try making this type of pasta for yourself, Nicholson has a forthcoming cookbook, Pasta, Pretty Please, that will be released in October 2018. It will include 25 dough recipes, 33 traditional and modern shaping techniques, and more. Pasta, Pretty Please is now available for pre-order on Amazon.


Linda Miller Nicholson creates rainbow pasta using natural, plant-based ingredients.

Colorful Rainbow Pasta by Linda Nicholson

Often, they include whimsical patterning and stripes.

Colorful Rainbow Pasta by Linda NicholsonColor Pasta NoodlesColorful Rainbow Pasta by Linda NicholsonColorful Rainbow Pasta by Linda NicholsonColorful Rainbow Pasta by Linda NicholsonColor Pasta NoodlesColor Pasta NoodlesColor Pasta NoodlesColor Pasta NoodlesColor Pasta NoodlesColorful Rainbow Pasta by Linda NicholsonColor Pasta NoodlesColorful Rainbow Pasta by Linda NicholsonColorful Rainbow Pasta by Linda NicholsonColorful Rainbow Pasta by Linda NicholsonColor Pasta NoodlesColor Pasta Noodles

To get an idea how Nicholson works her pasta-making magic, watch the video below:

Linda Miller Nicholson: Website | Instagram | YouTube

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Linda Miller Nicholson.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.07.31 00:22


Interview: Alexa Meade Reveals Behind the Scenes of Painting Ariana Grande for Her Music Video

By Sara Barnes on July 26, 2018

 

Alexa Meade Body Painting Ariana Grande

Still image from “God is a Woman”


설치예술가 알렉사 미드가  가수 아리아나 그란데의 

뮤직비디오를 위한 보디 페인팅 작품을 만들었다


알렉사 미드(1986년~)

미국의 설치예술가

독특한 캔버스 위에 그림을 그린다.


아리아나 그란데 (Ariana Grande)

1993년생

미국의 영화배우, 가수


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Chul Hwang, conpaper editor, curator




Artist Alexa Meade blurs the line between 2D and 3D art through brilliant body painting. Throughout the years, her practice has perfected a type of delightful illusion that makes this oscillation possible. When you look at Meade’s work in still images, you assume that you’re viewing a conventional painting, but to see her art in person—or in the process of creation—is a whole different story.  The artist’s subjects are people who have been painted to look like they’re figments of a 2D picture—clad in vibrant hues and energetic brush strokes—but move in a three-dimensional space.


Meade’s work is a mesmerizing sight, and it’s no surprise that her unique approach has gained her worldwide acclaim. Now, she can add another feather in her cap. She has most recently completed a music video with pop superstar Ariana Grande for her single called God is a Woman. Her body painting is the centerpiece of the video with a striking visual of Grande partially submerged in a vegan, milk-like substance.


The video is steeped in artistry as well as a bit of Meade’s past work. The concept was inspired by a 2012 collaboration with artist Sheila Vand (who worked with Meade on God is a Woman), in which Vand was painted by Meade and then bathed in milk; the result created a striking, quasi-psychedelic appeal.


For the music video, Meade achieved a similar aesthetic. “They [Ariana’s creative team] approached me with the concept of doing something in liquid,” Meade tells My Modern Met, “and essentially having Ariana in the center of a flower.” The collaboration yielded imagery influenced by the artist Georgia O'Keeffe and was aided by technology. “The pool was not the full size in the video and there was CG to extend the size of the pool. I was working on a very large liquid surface, but the CG also played a role in making it as epic as it was—so I can’t take full credit for that whole scale.”


Learn more about Meade’s creative process—including how she prepared for this very visual project—in our interview below.




How did this opportunity come about?

The music video director Dave Meyers encountered my collaboration [with artist Shiela Vand] back in 2012, where I painted her in a bathtub filled with milk, and he thought it was a really stunning visual and that it could be something great for God is a Woman.

Alexa Meade Body Painting Art on Ariana Grande

Still image from “God is a Woman”

What was the inspiration for bathing Ariana in this milk-like substance?

A big inspiration for the piece was Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings and we thought it would be cool to have Ariana coming out from the center of O'Keeffe's flowers, in a loosely interpreted sense.

In my normal work, I usually paint on three-dimensional spaces, but in this, for the concept, it seemed to make the most sense to have the background surface be something flat and 2D in liquid so that the paint could appear to swirl and animate and move around her.

Alexa Meade Body Painting Ariana Grande

Still image from the Alexa Meade/Shiela Vand collaboration in 2012

What other materials did you use for this project, aside from the milk-like substance?

I used some special types of paints because normally when I paint on people, I use a special non-toxic acrylic that washes off really easily. That is what I had done in the Alexa/Sheila collaboration in 2012, where part of the patterns in the milk was part of paint coming off of the body. But in [the music video], this very much had to stay in place on the body, so I used a special waterproof body paint that Ariana wore in the bath. And then I used a different type of paint to tint the surface of the liquid. It was really important, too, that the colors that I used in the liquid, that when they splashed against her body they didn't stain her body or tint the paint on her body. It took a lot [of research and development] to figure out the right mixture of things.

Alexa Meade Body Painting Ariana GrandeHow long did the project take, from the research to completion in the music video? 

I was told about the music video about two weeks before the shoot day, and I was traveling during a lot of that time, so it was only the week before the shoot that I was able to be in the studio and get to work on that. My collaborator Sheila Vand now lives in New York, so she flew into LA to work on that, and I set up five or six swimming pools in my studio to test different combinations of mixtures and it was literally a test kitchen.

Alexa Meade Body Painting Ariana GrandeWhat was the most challenging part of the project?

The research was really challenging. There were many long nights trying to pull it off. [I had to] pick the right paints for the body because normally I don't work with official body paint, especially not waterproof body paint. So I had to find something that would also be easy to remove so that it wouldn't cause any irritation on her skin. There were some products—waterproof body products—that I tested on my own body that stained or that, to take them off, you really had to rub hard, and I wanted to make this as comfortable as possible for Ariana.

Alexa Meade Body Painting Ariana Grande

Still image from “God is a Woman”

Did you ever imagine that you would be doing something like this when you started your artistic practice?

This is definitely one of the more ambitious projects I've ever done. I'm not necessarily surprised, but I am delighted. [A music video] is a really fun medium to explore my art in because it's not painting something static that you hang on a wall. It's something real that involves humans, it's breathing, and it lends itself really well to movement.

What kind of response have you gotten to this whole project? 

It's really cool, especially if you search the #godisawoman hashtag on Instagram. You see so many people reinterpreting it and creating makeup tutorials to do it. It's definitely sparked the imagination of people who were inspired by the aesthetic, and I think that that's the greatest mission of an artist, in some way to spark the imagination and inspire more to action, whether that's the act of creating artwork or just finding something within themselves that they want to express.

Alexa Meade Body Painting Art on Ariana Grande

Still image from “God is a Woman”

Do you have any advice for artists who would like to pursue work on a music video?

The big thing in this video that would've been challenging, if I didn't have as much experience, was just how fast everything is because there are so many moving parts. You really have to show up fully, ready to have a plan, but also ready to throw away the plan when need be and just be really agile and fast on your feet. [You also need to] know that going into it, you've done everything you can do to prepare, so to at least relieve some of the anxiety of the unknown, because there will be a lot that's unknown. As long as you know you're prepared as possible for the unknown that anything that surprises you will be a welcome surprise.

Alexa Meade: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Alexa Meade.


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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.07.23 00:09


“DNA Braid” Hair Trend Turns Ordinary Locks Into Spiraling DNA Molecules


By Sara Barnes on July 21, 2018

There are some hairstyles so technical that they seem like they could be the result of science experiments. One of the latest hairstyle trends leans into this idea even further by turning the coif into a symbol of biology; an awe-inspiring style called the DNA braid resembles a spiraling DNA molecule.





Rhode Island-based hairstylist Alexandra Wilson is the woman behind the trend that's quickly gaining popularity on Instagram. The first photo she shared features a woman with multicolored hair whose pink and green highlights showcase the complexity of the braid as the different rainbow hues twist and trail down the hair.


In a follow-up video, Wilson explains how to produce the DNA braid. It begins with the hair divided into three sections. From there, small bunches of hair wrap around the left, middle, and right sides. “Make sure you're being consistent with that pattern,” she advises, “the braid naturally starts to twist towards left as you go down so you have to keep it tight while braiding or else it will become more difficult. Small sections are always better, they make the braid look more intricate.”


See how others have rocked this mesmerizing hairstyle below.







Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.07.21 22:29


Incredible Photos Capture Powerful Lightning Storms Over Volcano Eruptions

By Jessica Stewart on July 20, 2018


Chilean landscape photographer Francisco Negroni is known for his incredible images showing extreme weather conditions. His work grabbed international attention in 2011, when his photographs of the Cordón Caulle eruption went viral and earned him several awards. Negroni's photography is unique for its ability to crystalize powerful moments in nature, showing its fiery energy in an artistic manner.


Francisco Negroni Volcano Photography



경이롭기까지 한 화산분화 번개폭풍 찰라 사진 


네그로니는 

2008년 칠레의 라이마 화산이 분출했을 때 정치부문 사진기자로 일하고 있었다.


비록 그 순간을 촬영할 수는 없었지만, 그 화산 분화는 그의 흥미를 자극했고 

그에 따라 그의 진로를 바꾸게 하는 계기가 됐다.


"내가 그 폭발을 본 것은 아주 작은 부분이었다."" 하지만 그것은 나에게 

뭔가 이상한 것을 느끼게 하고 다음 분화 때 반드시 사진을 찍어야겠다는  

동기를 부여하기에 충분했다. 


그 폭발을 보면서 폭발 사진의 세계에서 새출발하게 된 계기가 됐다."


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Chul Hwang, conpaper editor, curator


Negroni was working as a photo reporter, covering political news, when he happened to come upon the Llaima volcano eruption in 2008. Though he wasn't able to photograph the moment, the eruption piqued his interest and caused him to switch directions with his career. “It was so little what I saw of that eruption,” he tells My Modern Met. “But it was enough for me to feel something strange and motivate me to be aware of the next eruption and travel to take pictures of it. Seeing that eruption was my real motivation to start in this world of eruption photography.”




While his technique varies according to the eruption, he mainly focuses on long exposures to pull out the detail and intensity of the event. Some of his most striking images depict dirty thunderstorms, which occur when lightning is produced in the volcanic plume. The phenomenon is caused by the collision of ash, rock, and ejecta, which produces static electricity. Studies have shown that dirty thunderstorms are present 27% to 35% of the time, making Negroni's work all the rarer.


Negroni continues to travel around Chile in order to achieve the best possible images of volcanic activity, even leading photo tours around the country. “I will continue trying to show eruptions in all their magnitude and hope that the world, in general, continues to be surprised with my photographs.”



Francisco Negroni is known for his stunning photos of volcano eruptions around Chile.

Francisco Negroni Extreme Weather Photography

Francisco Negroni Landscape PhotographyFrancisco Negroni Extreme Weather PhotographyFrancisco Negroni Volcano PhotographyFrancisco Negroni Extreme Weather PhotographyFrancisco Negroni Landscape PhotographyFrancisco Negroni Volcano Photography

Francisco Negroni: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Francisco Negroni.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.07.18 22:22


Choose your warrior..

SNSMEDIA






Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.07.12 23:49


Fisherman Catches Beautifully Rare “Cotton Candy” Lobster in Canada

By Jessica Stewart on July 11, 2018


Fisherman Robinson Russell has been fishing for over 20 years, but he wasn't quite prepared for what he saw in one lobster haul off Grand Manan Island in Canada. Mixed in with the other lobsters was one stunning crustacean with a translucent blue-pink shell. Dubbed a “cotton candy” lobster, Russell donated his find—which he named Lucky—to the Huntsman Marine Science Center in New Brunswick, Canada.


매우 드문 아름다운 코튼색깔의 바닷 가재

캐나다에서 잡혔다


Lobsters, which only turn red when cooked, can have a lot of color variations on their shells. In fact, Russell had previously pulled blue, yellow, and bright orange lobsters from the same waters. There even exists calico and split tone lobsters, but the chances of spotting those are 1 in 30 million and 1 in 50 million, respectively, according to the University of Main Lobster Institute. But, Lucky is quite rare. While some sources say that lobsters with coloration like Lucky's are found every 4 or 5 years, marine biologists told TIME that the lobster appeared similar to an albino—making it a 1 in 100 million find.




So why is Lucky's shell such a special color? According to Cynthia Callahan, manager of the Huntsman Marine Science Center, it could be due to a genetic mutation that causes different pigments in the shell to be expressed. Of course, the coloration makes camouflage difficult, which only adds to the lobster's rarity.


Happily for Lucky, he'll be safe and sound at the Huntsman, where he'll live out the rest of his life.


Watch the cotton candy lobster in action at its new home at the Huntsman Marine Science Center.



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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.07.09 00:09



Japanese Man Beautifully Documents His Family’s Life in a One-Room Apartment

By Jessica Stewart on July 5, 2018

 

“The Yamamoto family has always slept next to each other.”


Masaki Yamamoto documentary photography



원룸 아파트에서 가족들과 아름다운 삶을 사는 일본 사진작가

 

'마사키 야마모토'

그의 가족의 삶의 적나라한 모습을 여과 없어 촬영해 사진집을 만들었다.


사진작품집의 이름 거츠(Guts)


그는 8살에 그가 살던 아파트에서 쫒겨나 가족과 헤어져 

아동시설에서 2년반을 보냈다.


그들은 마침내 원룸을 얻어 재결합했다. 그리고 18년을 함께 살고 있다.


어수선하고 혼란스러운 가운데에서도 우리는 그들 가족들이 즐거운 

시간과 보내며 특유의 농담과 웃음들을 보게 된다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Chul Hwang, conpaper editor, curator




Japanese photographer Masaki Yamamoto didn't have to go far to find inspiration for his work. Over the course of several years, the young photographer documented his family's life as they lived in a small, one-room apartment. For 18 years, his seven-person family thrived in these cramped quarters with tobacco stained walls. His photography book Guts is a collection of photos taken in that environment, and are a testament to the bond of the Yamamoto family.


After his family was evicted from an apartment when he was just 8 years old, Yamamoto spent 2.5 years in a children's institution—separated from his parents. They were finally able to reunite in their one-room dwelling, giving extra poignancy to the images. Amid the clutter and chaos, we see family members joking and laughing—genuinely enjoying the time spent together.


Guts is a poignant look at the love and laughter of the Yamamoto family, who lived in the same one-room apartment for 18 years.

Masaki Yamamoto photography

“My little brother trying to kiss my mother when she was trying to check his fever with her forehead.”

Masaki Yamamoto documentary photography

“Eating year-crossing noodles every year on New Year’s Eve.”

Masaki Yamamoto documentary photography

“While our mother, religious at heart for over 30 years, was praying, my younger sister was picking her nose.”

Masaki Yamamoto photography

“My father checking how much our 15-year-old little brother has grown up by trying to hold him up, saying ‘you have gotten bigger!'”

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Zen Foto Gallery.


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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.07.07 23:27


Incredible Winners of the 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

By Jessica Stewart on July 2, 2018


“Mermaid” by Reiko Takahashi / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. Grand Prize Winner and 1st place Nature. “I was fortunate to have encountered a humpback whale with her calf on my first day of snorkeling near Japan’s Kumejima Island. Most of the time, the calf stayed close to her mom. At one point, the calf began jumping and tapping its tail on the water near us—it was very friendly and curious. Finally, the mother, who was watching nearby, came to pick up the calf and swim away. I fell in love completely with the calf and it’s very energetic, large and beautiful tail.”


The 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year winner proves that pursuing your passion can bring great rewards. Japanese photographer Reiko Takahashi left her job as an engineer last year to follow her dream of becoming an underwater photographer. And now, her beautiful image of a humpback whale calf has garnered her the top prize of National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year.


Taken off the coast of Kumejima Island in Japan, the photograph was taken on the first day of Takahashi's trip to document whales and their calves. “It was a special scene for me, to be able to take a photo of the calf, completely relaxed in gentle waters,” said Takahashi. And now, she has a $10,000 grand prize to help further her career. “I really cannot believe it. It was my dream to win. I am honored and it will be the driving force for my future shooting.”


After months of entries, the winning photographs were selected from over 13,000 images. International photographers were encouraged to submit photos to one of three categories—People, Cities, and Nature. From there, an expert panel—which included Whitney Johnson, vice president of visual experiences at National Geographic, and polar photographer Camille Seaman—selected the winners.


“I was amazed at the quality of images and the sensibility towards subject in all three categories for this competition,” said Seaman. “Looking at hundreds of images choosing the winners was a daunting task. The images that stood out did so based not solely on their technical execution but also a sensitivity for a feeling of the moment and originality.”




See the top three winners in each category of the 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer to the Year contest.

2018 National Geographic Travel Photograph

“Geometry of the Sun” by Enrico Pescantini / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 2nd place Cities. “Teotihuacan means ‘the place where the gods were created,' and that's the exact feeling visitors have when they walk along the Avenue of the Dead at this Mexican archeological site. This pyramid was dedicated to the god of Sun, and I found it mesmerizing how the rising sun in the picture conquered just half the image, while the other half is in the shadows.
I have always loved archeology and ancient civilizations, so I couldn't wait to visit Mexico and explore the remains of the pre-Columbian civilization. I planned my visit to Teotihuacan at sunrise, to get a combination of golden sunlight, play of shadows, and few crowds around. I flew my drone to see if the image I had in my mind was really out there: luckily for me, this frame was just waiting for my camera!”

2018 National Geographic Travel Photograph

“Leida and Laëlle – I Will Life You Up” by Tati Itat / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 2nd place People. “Since 2016, I've been involved with Haitian immigrants and refugees living in my city, Estrela. I have become friends with some families, and especially with twin sisters, Leïda and Laëlle. They say living in Brazil is like living in paradise—very different from the reality of their country of origin. They dream of becoming models and teachers, as a way to earn money to bring their other relatives from Haiti to Brazil, to live all near one another.
On this day, they were playing in front of their home, improvising exercises to develop their imagination and creativity, as if they were actresses, and playing an imitation game with poses. Laëlle reached for Leida's face and lifted her head up, showing her where she should look. At this brief moment, I took the photo.”

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Winners

“Flamingos Taking Off” by hao j. / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 2nd place Nature. “Thousands of flamingos take off from the colorful salt Lake Natron in Tanzania. Before taking off, flamingos need to take a short run on water to build up some speed. at this time, Their long, red legs trod a series of water ripples on the surface of the lake. looking down from the helicopter, these ripple lines look like giant aquatic plants flowing in the water. This photo was taken from a helicopter.”


National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Winners

“Reflection” by Gaanesh Prasad / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 3rd place Cities. “On an early morning, I wanted to photograph the fog, which is epic in Dubai every year from December to January—and almost every photographer’s dream in this part of the world. Sadly, I could not get access to the rooftop and so I peeped through the glazed window on a lower floor. I was overwhelmed and excited to see how beautiful the city looks, and my excitement was quadrupled as soon as I saw the reflection of the road and building on the building that I was in. I immediately opened the window to the maximum permissible amount and clicked a single shot with stretched hands.”

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Winners

“Another Rainy Day in Nagasaki, Japan” by Hiro Kurashina / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 1st place Cities. “This is a view of the main street from a tram in Nagasaki on a rainy day. The tram is vintage, but retrofitted with modern ticketing equipment. A conductor is no longer on board—only the lone driver. The quiet streetscape seen through the front windshield of the tram somehow caught my attention. This view presents quite a contrast to busy urban centers in Japan, such as Tokyo and Osaka. The ride on a vintage tram through the relatively quiet main street was a memorable experience during our week-long visit to the historic city of Nagasaki.”

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Winners

“Alone in the Crowd” by Gary Cummins / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. Honorable mention Cities. “In this photo, I tried to bring the intense and stacked living conditions that Hong Kong is famous for into perspective for the viewer. With so many people living in small spaces, it's strange to see all these amenities empty. As a solo traveler, I’m often alone in crowds and this photo resonates with me. I barely scratched the surface of this incredible urban environment, but this image really summarizes my experience here.”

2018 National Geographic Travel Photograph

“Tea Culture” by Alessandra Meniconzi / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 1st place People. “For a long time, I have been fascinated by the ancient Mongolian method of hunting with Golden Eagles. In early 2018, I followed one family of eagle hunters during their migration from winter camp to spring camp.
Mongolia is sparsely populated, but the inhabitants have a very hospitable and welcoming culture. Tea for Kazakh culture is one of the attributes of hospitality. Tea isn't just a drink, but a mix of tradition, culture, relaxation, ceremony, and pleasure. Damel, seen here wrapped in heavy fur clothes, drinks a cup of tea to keep warm from the chilly temperatures in Western Mongolia.”


2018 National Geographic Travel Photograph

“Challenging Journey” by MD Tanveer Hassan Rohan / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 3rd place People. “This photograph was taken from Dhaka's airport rail station during the Eid vacation. People were returning to their village homes to spend Eid with families, and the rush at the last hour was immense. One man caught my attention: he was dangling on a train's handle with his family, trying to get inside the train. At that time, rain started and the train began to slowly move. The family had tickets to board the train, but couldn’t get to their seats. There are many people like him, who come to Dhaka for work—leaving their families and home villages—so when they get vacation, they don't want to miss the opportunity to spend time with dear ones, no matter what.”

2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year

“Mars” by Marco Grassi / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. 3rd place Nature. “These natural sand towers, capped with large stones, are known as the Earth Pyramids of Platten. They are situated in Northern Italy’s South Tyrol region. Formed centuries ago after several storms and landslides, these land formations look like a landscape from outer space and continuously change over the years and, more accurately, over seasons. This natural phenomenon is the result of a continuous alternation between periods of torrential rain and drought, which have caused the erosion of the terrain and the formation of these pinnacles. As the seasons change, the temperatures move between extremes and storms affect the area, pyramids disappear over time, while new pinnacles form as well.”

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by National Geographic.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.07.06 00:26


Interview: Creative Dad Photoshops His Kids Into the Funniest Situations

By Sara Barnes on July 4, 2018


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아이들을 무척이나 사랑하는 아빠가 아이들의 천진난만한 일거수 일투족을

촬영하여 멋진 포토샵을 연출했다.


디지털 아티스트 존 빌헬름과 아이들이 함께 했다.


For over seven years, photographer and self-taught digital artist John Wilhelm has creatively chronicled his kids' lives. Through his series of funny family photos, he uses digital manipulation to incorporate their everyday lives and childhood antics into fantastical scenes that are too delightfully outrageous to be real. (Otherwise, we'd definitely be fooled!) Wilhelm has seamlessly stitched together his subjects so well that it looks like one cohesive scene.


Wilhelm is always looking for great ideas for his photo manipulations, and it’s become a family affair over the years. His wife and four kids help him come up with concepts, although he admits that the older they are getting, the harder it is to get them in the studio to pose. But, don’t expect for Wilhelm to stop Photoshopping his kids into outrageous gym sessions, feeding frenzies, and skiing competitions anytime soon. Wilhelm and his wife just welcomed their fourth child so we’ll have many more years of these photos to enjoy.




We were elated to speak with Wilhelm about his work, from how he got started to how he honed his skills. Scroll down to read our exclusive interview with him.


Photo Manipulation by John WilheimPhoto Manipulation by John WilheimHow did you get into creating these fantastical photos of your children?


It all started approximately 7 years ago. I had some sort of creative crisis. Back then I was doing “only” standard photography. Nothing crazy with Photoshop etc… I was also very passionate but was always asking myself what all those images may be good for. Everything I shot had been done a billion times before by other photographers. During this phase, I stumbled over the images of the German photoshop artist Uli Staiger. I knew immediately this was the thing I'm going to learn… and I told my wife I would become one of the best Photoshoppers in the world one day. I don't feel like I reached that goal yet (not even close) but I'm really happy with how far I've come over the years.

Funny Family Photos by John Wilhelm Funny Family Photos by John Wilhelm What resources did you use to learn how to alter images?

There are tons of tutorials out there on the internet like Phlearn, LinkedIn Learning, YouTube. I started with German tutorials from Calvin Hollywood and Uli Staiger.

Were you given any tips early on that you found helpful?

The most important tip is: Don't get frustrated (it takes many many many hours to get really decent results) and buy Wacom or a similar graphic tablet.

Funny Family Photos by John Wilhelm Funny Family Photos by John Wilhelm How do you come up with your ideas for your photographs?

Yes, the whole family is sometimes coming up with something. In my head, I always have a subprocess running which is looking for funny ideas. Every single idea gets noted in Google Keep where it's waiting for the implementation. Unfortunately, I have only very little time (four kids and full-time job… nothing more to say) and so most ideas get a little dusty.

Funny Family Photos by John Wilhelm Photo Manipulation by John WilheimYour photos are so seamlessly composed. What do you shoot with a camera, and what comes from your computer?

The better I get with those fancy 3D stuff the less I have to shoot… usually, I create the props or whole backgrounds with Cinema4d and Zbrush and after that, I shoot the kids. Only in my studio with a camera of course, then all elements are put together in Photoshop.

Funny Family Photos by John Wilhelm Photo Manipulation by John WilheimAs your kids get older, how do the photos change?

It's getting more and more difficult to bring them up to my studio, but luckily I still have very little ones to work with.

Photo Manipulation by John WilheimWhat are you working on now?

At the moment I'm not working on photo projects but on birthday movies for my kids (I do this every year) and on 3D-models (3D printing is another passion of mine) which will become a nice product together with the handmade leather purses from my wife.

Funny Family Photos by John Wilhelm

John Wilhelm: Website | Facebook | Instagram Flickr

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by John Wilhelm.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
Nature2018.06.30 01:31


Stunning Aerial Photos Offer a Unique Perspective of Venice

By Jessica Stewart on June 18, 2018


eing one of the most photographed cities in the world, it's hard to get a unique image of Venice. And yet, architect and photographer Dimitar Karanikolov managed to do just that with his stunning aerial photographs. People often think that the best views of Venice come by boat, but Karanikolov's drone photos show the incredible artistry in Venice's urban structures.


Waking up early to catch the sunrise, Karanikolov used a drone to capture incredible panoramas of the city. “Aerial photography allows a top-down view of the world—which could be done only with a drone or a satellite,” the photographer tells My Modern Met. “These straight down photos are very architectural, almost like a plan view, and completely different from the human, everyday perspective.”



Burnt sienna dominates the color palette, as tightly packed terracotta roofs are interspersed with splashes of blue canals and white marble facades. Reminiscent of ancient aerial maps of Venice, such as Jacopo de Barbari's View of Venice, the photos give us a bird's-eye view of the lagoon.


It was Karanikolov's desire to show off Venice's amazing urban planning, something his architectural background surely taught him to appreciate. And above all he wanted to show “a very familiar place from a unique new angle.”


These aerial views of Venice by Dimitar Karanikolov give a unique perspective on a city that's been photographed by millions.

Drone Photography Vence by Dimitar Karanikolov

Aerial Photography Venice by Dimitar KaranikolovAerial Photo of VeniceDrone Photography Vence by Dimitar KaranikolovDrone Photography Vence by Dimitar KaranikolovDrone Photography Vence by Dimitar Karanikolov

Dimitar Karanikolov: Website Behance | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use images by Dimitar Karanikolov.

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