'people'에 해당되는 글 603건

  1. 2018.06.20 Stunning Aerial Photos Offer a Unique Perspective of Venice
  2. 2018.06.06 5 Ways This App Is Making It Easier For Creative Professionals to Network 당신을 SNS 등 네트워크 프로로 만들어 주는 방법 5가지
  3. 2018.05.10 A Look at the Magical World of Iconic Photographer Rodney Smith 사진작가 로드니 스미스의 마술같은 사진의 세계
  4. 2018.05.05 Artist Performs Stunning Underwater Choreography in the World’s Deepest Pool 세계 최고 깊이 풀에서 수중 안무
  5. 2018.04.28 VIDEO; Has Korea meeting revealed Kim Jong-un’s TRUE height? Dictator is officially 5ft 7in but he appears to be an inch 이번 드러난 북 독재자의 키는?
  6. 2018.04.21 Hawkers Rome Store 호커스 로마 숍
  7. 2018.04.21 Photographer Immortalizes Vibrant Neon Streets of Hong Kong and Tokyo 세계 최고의 네온사인 도시 홍통과 도쿄
  8. 2018.04.19 Winners of 2018 Birth Photography Contest Celebrate Magic Moments of Childbirth
  9. 2018.04.17 Photographer Born Without Hands and Legs Reveals How He Shoots Gorgeous Images
  10. 2018.04.14 Hotel sex is the hottest sex of all and now we know why
  11. 2018.04.12 VIDEO: Killer robots that are incapable of telling the difference between innocent civilians and enemies could be on battlefields within a YEAR, claims expert
  12. 2018.04.09 VIDEO: From sex on a grave to wild orgies: Erotic exploits of a wealthy sheikh in the Ottoman Empire are revealed in a 200-year-old manuscript that could fetch £350,000 at auction
  13. 2018.03.27 Interview: Expressive Paintings of Native Americans in Authentic Dress
  14. 2018.03.25 Photographer Captures All 11 of Her Kids in One Stunning Heirloom Portrait
  15. 2018.03.24 How the Development of the Camera Changed Our World
  16. 2018.03.14 VIDEO; A 19th century engraving of Casanova and one of his conquests.
  17. 2018.03.08 VIDEO: Lacoste Replaces Iconic Crocodile Logo With 10 Endangered Species
  18. 2018.03.07 Microgreens: All You Ever Wanted to Know, Plus How to Grow Them
  19. 2018.03.07 Portraits of “Most Beautiful Chickens on the Planet” Capture Their Underrated Beauty
  20. 2018.03.07 VIDEO: Scientists Discover Satisfying Sounds of an 800,000-Year-Old Antarctic Glacier
  21. 2018.02.28 Woman Creates Exquisite “Wearable Storybook” Dress Inspired by a French Town
  22. 2018.02.28 VIDEO: Paris Couture Week 2018: Lessons In Female Empowerment
  23. 2018.02.24 Mysterious Spiral Found in the Tail of Human Sperm 정자의 꼬리에서 발견된 나선형태의 나노구조
  24. 2018.02.20 The Biggest Spring 2018 Fashion Trends From the Designer Runways
  25. 2018.02.15 VIDEO: Fixed wing drone
  26. 2018.02.10 VIDEO: Feel 'True Love': Husky Cafe Discovered in Bangkok
  27. 2018.02.10 VIDEO: New York fashion week: industry faces its #MeToo moment
  28. 2018.02.07 Laser Mapping Unearths 60,000 Ancient Maya Structures in Guatemalan Jungle
  29. 2018.01.25 Point
  30. 2018.01.22 VIDEO: One of the best feelings
people2018.06.20 17:35


Stunning Aerial Photos Offer a Unique Perspective of Venice

By Jessica Stewart on June 18, 2018


Being one of the most photographed cities in the world, it's hard to get a unique image of Venice. And yet, architect and photographer Dimitar Karanikolov managed to do just that with his stunning aerial photographs. People often think that the best views of Venice come by boat, but Karanikolov's drone photos show the incredible artistry in Venice's urban structures.



Waking up early to catch the sunrise, Karanikolov used a drone to capture incredible panoramas of the city. “Aerial photography allows a top-down view of the world—which could be done only with a drone or a satellite,” the photographer tells My Modern Met. “These straight down photos are very architectural, almost like a plan view, and completely different from the human, everyday perspective.”



Burnt sienna dominates the color palette, as tightly packed terracotta roofs are interspersed with splashes of blue canals and white marble facades. Reminiscent of ancient aerial maps of Venice, such as Jacopo de Barbari's View of Venice, the photos give us a bird's-eye view of the lagoon.


It was Karanikolov's desire to show off Venice's amazing urban planning, something his architectural background surely taught him to appreciate. And above all he wanted to show “a very familiar place from a unique new angle.”


These aerial views of Venice by Dimitar Karanikolov give a unique perspective on a city that's been photographed by millions.

Drone Photography Vence by Dimitar Karanikolov

Aerial Photography Venice by Dimitar KaranikolovAerial Photo of VeniceDrone Photography Vence by Dimitar KaranikolovDrone Photography Vence by Dimitar KaranikolovDrone Photography Vence by Dimitar Karanikolov

Dimitar Karanikolov: Website | Behance | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use images by Dimitar Karanikolov.

KCONTENTS



Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.06.06 11:56


5 Ways This App Is Making It Easier For Creative Professionals to Network

By Jessica Stewart on June 5, 2018


Networking—it’s a word that strikes fear into many professionals. But the truth is, you don’t have to be the gregarious person shaking every hand in the room to be great at networking. And, in the digital age, it’s possible to be an effective networker right from your home. The bottom line is that networking, no matter how you get it done, is a critical part of growing your creative business and getting your name out there.


TREB Wire


당신을 SNS 등 네트워크 프로로 만들어 주는 방법 5가지 


edited by kcontents


From grabbing new clients to linking up with professionals that can elevate your career, building a solid network sets yourself up for success. Mingling with other professionals is also a fantastic way to brainstorm ideas or find mentors to help guide you and Shapr, the free networking app for professionals, is making it easier than ever to make the right connections. The app is simple to set up and takes only a few minutes each day to connect with like-minded professionals in your area and meet up in real life to take your network to a new level.


To make sure you’re on top of your networking game, we’ve focused on five ways you can be more effective in expanding your professional circles through Shapr. And if done correctly, networking can become one of the most pleasurable parts of your business routine.




Want to be more effective in your professional networking? Here are 5 networking tips to take your career to new heights.

1. BE “SOCIAL” 많은 사람들과 활발히 교류하라

One of the great things about technology is that it opens up networking opportunities that never previously existing. Having a social media presence is already an essential part of building your creative brand, but did you know it can be just as effective in networking?

Shapr takes things a step further and aims to get people off their phones and meeting face to face or over a call. Designed to turn online encounters into in-person meetings, the app’s algorithm will pair you with professionals in your area. Just swipe right if they seem interesting and if you’re paired, you can strike up a conversation. You’ll also be able to see the other party’s social media profiles, which allows you to interact across multiple platforms.

Shapr - Professional Networking App

2. BE OPEN TO MEETING NEW PEOPLE WITH DIFFERENT IDEAS

자신과 다른 생각을 가진 사람들에게  개방하고 만나서 대화하라

With 1.2 million people on Shapr you never know who you will meet, but one of the biggest mistakes people make when networking is immediately pushing their own agenda. Listening is one of the most valuable tools you can have when networking because it lets different perspectives come through. By keeping your ears open, you’ll receive information that could spark a new idea or partnership. And by taking a real interest in the other party, they’ll know that you are just as invested in what they have to offer.


To that end, when connecting with new people—whether online or in person—ask questions that will really help you get to know that person. Of course, you’ll want to understand them professionally, but also taking the time to know a bit more about their family, hobbies, and personal aspirations may unearth interesting opportunities.

Networking Tips for Creatives

3. KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN FOR OPPORTUNITY

늘 자신에게 올  기회를 노리며 온 기회를 놓치지 마라

It’s your job to recognize and seize the opportunity. Traveling can also be a great way of branching out and expanding your network. With Shapr, you can easily meet professionals in any city, as the app also uses location to pair professionals. And its Teleport feature allows you to set your location manually, meaning you can set up a chat over coffee before you even arrive at your destination.


You don’t just have to be at trade shows or gallery openings to network. Opportunities can present themselves anywhere, and you always want to be prepared. It’s always a good idea to make sure friends know of what projects you’re working on, both currently and in the future. Connectors within your circle may put the perfect professional in front of you at a friendly dinner or during brunch.

 

Shapr Professional Networking App

4. MEET PEOPLE YOU WOULD NORMALLY AVOID

자신이 싫어하는 사람들은 만나봐라

Think outside the box in terms of who you should network with. For instance, artists often gravitate toward curators, collectors, and gallerists. But with Shapr you can connect with an architect or interior designer who might present other opportunities for getting artwork into private and commercial spaces. The key is not to keep yourself hemmed into one way of thinking. It’s about taking risks in meeting and mingling with different professionals that fall outside your normal sphere.

Networking for Creatives

5. KEEP IN TOUCH

사람들과 자주 연락하라

So you’ve matched on Shapr, and even met up for coffee. Don’t let the line of communications shut down! Networking is about building relationships, and relationships take time. Checking in will help keep you fresh in the mind of the other party—and you never know when the timing might be right for something further to develop. Even just a short note with a link to an article you think they might find interesting can do wonders. It will show that you were listening to their interests, and goes back to the give and take of the relationship. By touching base, but not always asking for something directly, you’re demonstrating that you’d like to forge a real connection. And in the end, that’s how the best relationships begin.

So what are you waiting for? Download Shapr today and put these tips to use!

Shapr: iOS | Android

All images via Shapr.

kcontents



Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.05.10 03:35


A Look at the Magical World of Iconic Photographer Rodney Smith

By Jessica Stewart on May 1, 2018


‘Man on Ladder in Times Square, New York, NY,' 1999.


세계적인 사진작가 로드니 스미스의 마술같은 사진의 세계


For over 45 years, fine art and fashion photographer Rodney Smith brought his unique vision to the world through his whimsical imagery. Playful and surreal, his photographs graced the pages of TIME, The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times, among others. Even after his passing in 2016, his legacy carries on through the galleries and museums that continue to display his work, as well as publications and new photographers influenced by his style.


An appreciation for elegance and beauty came to Smith early, as the son of Anne Klein president Stanford Smith. While studying at Yale, he began taking classes with acclaimed photographer Walker Evans, soaking in the lessons learned and transforming them into his own style. Merging what he learned, four factors became the driving force behind his work—composition, scale, proportion, and relation.



“Composition in photography is like rhythm is in music,” he shared with My Modern Met in 2015. “I am a product of an earlier era—for example, when the compositional senses of photographers such as Henri Cartier-Bresson, W. Eugene Smith, Andr Kertsz, etc. were impeccable; everything was in the right place.” In an age when we're are used to seeing photo manipulation, it's important to note that Smith's compositions were created in-camera. A faithful devotee of film photography, he never switched over to digital technology, preferring to make magic on site rather than in post-production.


For much of his career, Smith shot exclusively in black and white, only switching to color in 2002. Still, all his imagery has a classic, timeless feel, as though the characters are suspended in limbo. Even when their backs are turned to the camera or faces are obscured, his skill as a fine art photographer brings out unspoken emotions in the viewer. In his own words, it was his “mission to find order out of chaos.”


Rodney Smith Fine Art Photography

‘Edythe and Andrew Kissing on Taxi, New York,' 2007

Rodney Smith Fashion Photographer

‘Zoe Balancing Teapot on Head, Burden Mansion, New York, NY,' 2006.

Rodney Smith Surreal Photography

‘Viktoria Under Lampshade, Rhinebeck, New York,' 2011

Rodney Smith Surreal Photography

‘Viewfinder face with hat, Liberty Park, New Jersey,' 1997.

Rodney Smith and Surrealism

A man in a bowler hat about to leap from a skyscraper or perched high on a ladder in Times Square—these iconic images of Smith's are an unmistakable nod to Surrealism. A wink at Belgian master René Magritte, Smith viewed his work as part of a personal quest, one that helped him deal with and reveal his most intimate feelings. “I put my life on the line for photography and it returned the effort with abundance,” he wrote on his blog in 2014.

Much in that way that Surrealists viewed their art as a vehicle for the unconscious to express itself, Smith was never quite certain what would be the end result of his shoots. This attitude allowed him to work flexibly within any location and capture the story as it unfolded.

“I do not have any preconceived or preordained ideas. The location is the key in which I compose in. Once I find the location, everything sort of falls into place for me. It's the location that drives all the pictures,” he told My Modern Met in 2011. “One of the things that is interesting, and I think people are always intrigued by this, is that though my pictures seem so composed, they are extremely spontaneous. 95% of the pictures I take, I didn't even know I was going to take them a few minutes before.”

Rodney Smith Black and White Photography

‘Alan Leaping From 515 Madison Avenue, New York City,' 1999.

Rodney Smith Surreal Photography

‘Nathan Holding Portrait of Himself, Amenia, New York,' 2011.

Rodney Smith Surreal Photography

‘Skyline, Hudson River, New York,' 1995.

Rodney Smith Fashion Photographer

‘Saori on Sea Plane Wing, Dominican Republic,' 2010.

Rodney Smith Whimsical Photography

‘Saori & Mossimo Holding Hands, Amalfi, Italy,' 2007.

The Legacy of Rodney Smith's Whimsical Photography

The magical world that Rodney Smith portrayed endures, with his studio continuing to promote the lessons that Smith embodied through his photography. As more and more photographers return to film, picking up the beloved Leica M4 and medium-format Hasselblad that were his tools of the trade, a renewed appreciation for what he was able to achieve has sprung up.

Through publications, including Rodney Smith: Photographs—a comprehensive look at his illustrious career—it's possible to review his rich archive of work. Prints of some of his most well-known photographs allow collectors to hang Smith's work in their home and his work is represented by galleries across Asia, Europe, and North America. In the United States, prestigious galleries Gilman Contemporary, Robert Klein Galleries, and Fahey Klein Gallery represent Smith's work.

Rodney Smith Surreal PhotographyRodney Smith Surreal Photography

Rodney Smith Fashion Photography

‘Bernadette in Red Hat With Book, New York Public Library, NY, ‘2003.

Rodney Smith Fashion Photography

‘Woman with Hat Between Hedges, France,' 2004.

Watch Rodney Smith as he discusses his career and legacy.

Rodney Smith: Website | Facebook

kcontents



Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.05.05 14:42


Artist Performs Stunning Underwater Choreography in the World’s Deepest Pool

By Emma Taggart on May 4, 2018



Performed and directed by French deep-sea diver, dancer, and filmmaker Julie Gautier, AMA is a video performance project that follows the artist’s graceful underwater movements. Filmed in the world’s deepest pool in Venice, Italy, the captivating underwater dance is titled after the Japanese word for “woman of the sea.” The short film premiered in more than 40 public screenings around the world on International Women’s Day (March 8th 2018), and is dedicated “to all the women of the world.” The artist explains, “For me, this film is a way to say: you are not alone.”





세계 최고 깊이 풀에서 수중 안무



AMA begins with Gautier standing in heavy rain, as the camera moves in to focus on her face. Then it cuts to the artist lying motionless, and pans across her body. When she slowly rises from the floor, it suddenly becomes apparent that Gautier isn’t just on the ground—she’s actually inside the aforementioned swimming pool.


Over the course of about 6 minutes, we can see Gautier holding her breath and performing an incredible routine unlike anything else. She elegantly glides through the crystal-clear, calm water like a ballerina in slow motion. With each controlled movement, her silk-like hair and the fabric of her dress flow and “dance” with her. The film ends as Gautier gracefully rises up to the surface, beneath a sparkling release of effervescent air bubbles.






You can see more short films by Gautier on her website—including the Beyoncé and Arrow Benjamin music video she co-directed (Runnin') which features her free-diving world champion husband, Guillaume Nery. And, check out her collaborative underwater film company with her husband, Les Films Engloutis.


Performed and directed by French deep-sea diver, dancer, and filmmaker Julie Gautier, AMA follows the artist’s graceful underwater movements.

Underwater Dance by Julie Gautier

Filmed in the world’s deepest pool in Venice, Italy, the captivating underwater dance is dedicated “to all the women of the world.”

Underwater Dance by Julie Gautier



Gautier glides through the crystal-clear, calm water like a ballerina in slow motion, holding her breath the entire time.

Underwater Dance by Julie GautierUnderwater Dance by Julie GautierUnderwater Dance by Julie GautierUnderwater Dance by Julie GautierUnderwater Dance by Julie Gautier

Julie Gautier: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Vimeo
h/t: [Colossal]

All images via Julie Gautier. 

KCONTENTS



Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.04.28 02:45


Has Korea meeting revealed Kim Jong-un’s TRUE height? Dictator is officially 5ft 7in but he appears to be an inch 




SHORTER than President Moon who is believed to be 5ft 6in

North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un has been reported as being 5ft and 7in tall

However, photos from summit shows him shorter than President Moon Jae-In 

South Korean President is said to be 5ft 6in, but looks at least one inch taller





김정은의 키는 163cm

문재인의 키는 165cm로 김정은보다 2cm가 더 크다



By SARA MALM FOR MAILONLINE

PUBLISHED: 15:31 BST, 27 April 2018 | UPDATED: 16:59 BST, 27 April 2018


Kim Jong-Un reportedly claims to be 5ft7in tall - however pictures from today's summit in South Korea appear to tell a different story.



The North Korean dictator looks at least one inch shorter than South Korean President Moon Jae-In - who is reportedly 5ft 6in. 





Photos of the pair standing and walking side-by-side in the border village of Panmunjom, shows that Kim is shorter than President Moon, despite his infamous bouffant hairstyle.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5665091/Has-Korean-leaders-meeting-revealed-Kim-Jong-uns-TRUE-height-Appears-shorter-President-Moon.html#ixzz5Dtacp7gk 



SNSMedia



Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.04.21 16:42

Hawkers Rome Store

New Italian Retail Architecture: Via Belsiana Sunglasses Company Shop – design by CuldeSac

20 Apr 2018

Hawkers Rome Store

Architects: CuldeSac

Address: Via Belsiana, 33, 00187 Roma RM, Italia – near Plaza de España

Hawkers Rome Store

Hawker’s energy invades Rome

CuldeSac ™ designs, in collaboration with Hawker’s retail team, the second flaghship of the brand right in the heart of Italy, transgressing traditional materials to bring them closer to the essence of the product.

Hawkers Rome: pure energy



비아 벨시아나(Via Belsiana) 선글라스 회사의 로마


호커스는 세계적인 선글라스 브랜드

비아 벨시아나가 획기적인 선글라스 스토어를 로마에 개관했다;


미국 디자인회사 컬드삭(CuldeSac)이 설계했으며 이태리 중심에 

두번째 플래그쉽을 기록했다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Chul Hwang, conpaper editor, curator


There is no better way to define the new flagship store.

Hawkers Rome Store Hawkers Rome Store


The use of color in a spontaneous, changeable and living way characterizes the space. An explosion of energy is reflected in the mirror baseboards of the walls, in which 3d animations allow the Brand to interact with the client. The color interacts with the environment to alter it, becoming the filter that surrounds it all.


Hawkers Rome Store


The Hawker’s character enters the city and defines the store’s spirit, becoming a covering that makes us feel inside a marble glass; a stone pool, that absorbs the energy that the city irradiates during the day and shines when the city is asleep, thanks to the resin that fills the veining.




Hawkers Rome Store


The brand lives inside the marble and see the light throughout the veining. Hawkers is a liquid brand and appear as such in the space with the color. – Borja Berna. Architect at CuldeSac™ Custom


Hawkers Rome Store


The limits of the space are blurred thanks to the mirrors that interact with the clients, giving the store a feeling of dynamism, character, game and light. – Lucía del Portillo, Partner & Creative Director at CuldeSac Custom


Hawkers Rome Store


A vibrant space located just near Plaza de España, that plays with the client perceptions, the physical limits and technology to generate an original experience.




Hawkers Rome Store


Hawkers arrives in Rome with premium materials fabricated ad-hoc, ready to infiltrate the classicism and the roman luxury, impregnating the city with its strong personality, and beginning its conquest of the european continent.

Hawkers keeps, with this store, making its own rules.


Hawkers Rome Store


Hawkers Rome – Building Information

Title: Hawkers Rome Store
Location: Rome, Italy
Size: 17 square meters
Opening date: April 2018
Category: Store Design
Designer: CuldeSac Custom Retail, Spain
Website: http://www.culdesac.es

Photographer: Luigi Filetici (http://luigifiletici.it)

About CuldeSac

CuldeSac™, the strategic and creative consultancy headquartered in Valencia, produces ideas and concepts intended to bring added value and business to brands. The multidisciplinary team of this creative lab is specialised in developing and executing unique brand experiences throughout the world.
CuldeSac™ is currently one of the most multifaceted studios on the Spanish creative scene. Internationally renowned and a usual collaborator of premium brands, it explores alternative avenues for carrying out interdisciplinary projects for spaces, product branding, events, communication and PR.
www.culdesac.es

Hawkers Rome Store images / information received 190418 from CuldeSac


kcontents




Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.04.21 00:56


Photographer Immortalizes Vibrant Neon Streets of Hong Kong and Tokyo

By Jessica Stewart on April 13, 2018


Hong Kong


Moroccan photographer and 3D artist Zaki Abdelmounim merges his skill sets to produce incredible night photography of well-loved Asian cities. His photographs of Hong Kong and Tokyo show the vibrant, neon-soaked streets bustling with activity throughout all hours of the night.


A love of surreal science fiction and noir pushed Abdelmounim to create each series and use his design skills to pull out the saturated details of the neon lights of the respective cities. “The projects came from a fascination with fictional cyberpunk and neon-noir worlds, and a feeling of urgency to live and conjure images of these vibes from our real world,” Abdelmounim tells My Modern Met. “It's the juxtaposition of a different era and the present we live in, of the real and fiction, what makes it a worthwhile experience.”


Fighting the chaos around him to hone in on specific experiences, Abdelmounim is able to tell a cohesive story with his work. From bustling intersections to friends sharing a laugh, he captures the human experience in addition to the massive architecture. And as such, his work has an intimate feel that battles against the sensory overload of the environment.


Shanghai, Seoul, Chicago, and New York are all on the photographer's wishlist for the ongoing project. Keep an eye out for where he'll land next and if you are interested in prints, they are available via Curioos.




Inspired by cyberpunk and neon-noir, photographer Zaki Abdelmounim captures the neon streets of Hong Kong and Tokyo.

Tokyo Night Photography

Tokyo

Zaki Abdelmounim - Neon Night Photography

Hong Kong

Photo of Hong Kong

Hong Kong




Zaki Abdelmounim - Neon Night Photography

Tokyo

Hong Kong Skyline at Night

Hong Kong

Hong Kong Night Photography

Hong Kong

Hong Kong Night Photography

Hong Kong



Zaki Abdelmounim Neon Streets Tokyo

Tokyo

Zaki Abdelmounim - Neon Night Photography

Hong Kong

Zaki Abdelmounim Neon Streets Hong Kong

Hong Kong

Zaki Abdelmounim Neon Streets Hong Kong
Hong Kong



Zaki Abdelmounim Neon Streets Tokyo

Tokyo

Photo of Hong Kong at Night

Hong Kong

Hong Kong Night Photography

Hong Kong

Zaki Abdelmounim Neon Streets Hong Kong

Hong Kong



Zaki Abdelmounim Neon Streets Hong Kong

Hong Kong

Tokyo Night Photography

Tokyo

Hong Kong Night Photography

Hong Kong

Zaki Abdelmounim - Neon Night Photography

Tokyo

Tokyo Night Photography

Tokyo




Hong Kong Night Photography

Hong Kong

Photo of Hong Kong at Night

Hong Kong

Zaki Abdelmounim: Behance | Curioos 

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Zaki Abdelmounim.

kcontents




Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.04.19 23:33


Winners of 2018 Birth Photography Contest Celebrate Magic Moments of Childbirth

By Sara Barnes on April 19, 2018


“Stunning Siblings First Encounter,” First Place Winner, Photo: Marijke Thoen Birthphotography


Childbirth represents one of the greatest—and most rewarding—challenges that a human can endure. Every year, the International Association of Professional Birth Photographers (IAPBP) celebrate this poignant experience with their annual birth photography contest. As an online community of over 1,200 members in 42 countries, they host the Image Competition in an effort to “share the beauty of birth with the world.”







The 2018 winners were recently announced, and within the scope of the competition, history was made. In 2016, photographer Marijke Thoen Geboortefotografie won the grand prize for her image of a water birth. “The beautiful baby in that photo is now a big sister,” the competition explains, “and [Geboortefotografie] has won the 2018 competition with an image featuring the adorable siblings!”



In addition to Geboortefotografie’s awe-inspiring photograph, IAPBP has selected winners in categories including Labor, Delivery, Postpartum, and Birth Details, as well as the top portraits chosen by its members. Each image represents its own incredible journey and is a testament to just how amazing our bodies are. See the artful birth photos below.


Each year, the International Association of Professional Birth Photographers hosts an Image Competition featuring the best in birth photography.


Newborn Photography

“Nowhere and Everywhere,” Best in Category: Labor, Photo: Rebecca Coursey

Birth Photography Contest

“En Caul Baby Birth,” Best in Category: Delivery, Photo: Daniela Justus




Newborn Photography

“Flesh of My Flesh,” Best in Category: Postpartum, Photo: Esther Edith

Birth Photography Contest

“Birth of a Brother,” Best In Category: Birth Details, Photo: Daniela Justus

Newborn Photography

“Three Become Four,” Members Choice Winner, Photo: Esther Edith




Photo of Baby Being Born

“Take My Hand, Hold My Heart,” Members Choice Best in Category: Postpartum, Photo: Tamara Milldove

Birth Photography Contest

“Birthing Waves,” Honorable Mention, Photo: Robin Baker

Birth Photography Contest

“Touch,” Honorable Mention, Photo: Krista Evans




Birth Photography Contest

“Labor by Candlelight,” Honorable Mention, Photo: Ashley Marston

Birth Photography Contest

“Nurse Linda,” Honorable Mention, Photo: Tammy Karin




Birth Photography Contest

“Fist Bump for Mom,” Honorable Mention, Photo: Neely Ker-Fox

Newborn Photography

“A Physiological Third Stage,” Honorable Mention, Photo: Paige Driscoll

Newborn Photography

“Love Complete,” Honorable Mention, Photo: Marjolein Loppies

Newborn Photography

“Admiration and Relief,” Honorable Mention, Photo: Kandyce Joeline



Newborn Photography

“Underwater Scream,” Honorable Mention, Photo: Caroline Devulder

Newborn Photography

“How Big,” Honorable Mention, Photo: Megan Brock

IAPBP: Website | Facebook

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by IAPBP.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.04.17 02:41


Photographer Born Without Hands and Legs Reveals How He Shoots Gorgeous Images

By Sara Barnes on April 16, 2018





If you’re truly passionate about something, then you find a way to pursue it—even when there seem to be insurmountable obstacles in your way. Indonesian professional photographer Achmad Zulkarnain is a shining example of this fact. Born without hands and legs, he has gained international attention for his work, all of which he does on his own.



In a short video by Great Big Story, we get a peek into Zulkarnain’s world. “I don’t let my limitations limit my steps forward,” he begins, “or limit my dreams.” He started his photography journey while taking ID card pictures in his village. “I thought photography was really interesting,” he recalls. After buying a camera on credit, he eventually turned his hobby into a career.


Through his physical challenges, Zulkarnain demonstrates his ingenuity and ability to adapt to a world built for able-bodied people. He has his own custom-built car that allows him to travel to “far places” and capture beautiful backdrops. And using an extra bit of skin on his arms, he can push the camera shutter. His mouth turns the device on and off. Once he’s done shooting, he retouches the images on his computer. The results are striking with a beautiful sense of light and dewy color.


Watch the inspiring story below.



https://mymodernmet.com/achmad-zulkarnain-photographer-disability

kcontents




Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.04.14 13:55


Hotel sex is the hottest sex of all and now we know why

But why?


MARIA LORETO, THE FRESH TOAST


The idea of hot hotel sex makes couples want to book rooms on special occasions like anniversaries and birthdays. They believe that a change in scenery can provide an escape from normalcy and will work wonders for their sex life. Now this belief is backed up by research.


For starters, couples tend to get inspired when they’re at hotels. They like to dress up, drink alcohol, listen to music, and eat chocolates, all of which affects directly on the amount of dopamine their bodies produce, making them happier and more relaxed than usual. The fact that they’re in a new place is also a dopamine booster, which is a little crazy but we’ll go along with it.





Checking into a hotel also triggers a feeling in couples as if they were going on a vacation, even if they’re just booking one night on an crappy hotel located in the town they’ve always lived at. This mini vacay makes couples forget a little about their responsibilities, their jobs and kids, giving them a feeling of escape and relaxation, prompting them to make the most out of the moment.


Obviously, the fancier the hotel the better. A beautiful lobby, clean sheets, a stocked up mini bar and some room service can truly do miracles for every couple in the world.

https://www.salon.com/2017/05/12/science-hotel-sex-is-the-hottest-sex-of-all-and-now-we-know-why_partner

kcontents


Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.04.12 00:14


Killer robots that are incapable of telling the difference between innocent civilians and enemies could be on battlefields within a YEAR, claims expert




  • Comment was made by Dr Noel Sharkey from Sheffield University  
  • Artificial intelligence is being used by countries to make weapons
  • These robots would be fully autonomous and need no human oversight  
  • Leading experts believe that these machines should be banned by a UN treaty 
  • Officials have gathered at a Geneva conference this week to discuss a global prohibition on killer robots



무고한 시민과 적을 구별하지 못하는 킬러 로봇이 

일년 안에 전쟁터에 있게 될 수도 있다고 전문가들은 주장한다.



Killer robots could be on battlefields within a year if the UN fails to arrange an international treaty limiting their development.

That's the claim of Professor Noel Sharkey, who says early wartime machines could cause mass deaths and they will not be able to tell the difference between enemies and civilians.

His comments come as 120 United Nations member states meet this week at the Palais des Nations complex in Geneva to continue talks on the future challenges posed by lethal autonomous weapons system.  


Scroll down for video 

Dr Noel Sharkey (right) is pictured here with Nobel Peace Laureate Jody Williams (left) campaigning for a ban on fully autonomous weapons. He believes an international treaty banning them is 'vitally important' at a UN conference in Geneva this week

Dr Noel Sharkey (right) is pictured here with Nobel Peace Laureate Jody Williams (left) campaigning for a ban on fully 

autonomous weapons. He believes an international treaty banning them is 'vitally important' at a UN conference in 

Geneva this week


Dr Noel Sharkey, a Professor of AI and Robotics as well as a Professor of Public Engagement at the University of Sheffield, told MailOnline that an international treaty banning the use of fully autonomous killer robots is 'vitally important'.


The AI expert has a rich history in the field of robotics, including a stint as head judge on the popular TV show 'Robot Wars'.


Professor Sharkey said: 'Most [countries] have said that meaningful human control of weapons is vitally important. 

'I believe that we will get a treaty but the worry is what sort of treaty? 

'Without a treaty, killer robots could be rolled out within a year.'  



Nations are currently developing their own versions of these 'killer robots' and there is little to no legislation to prevent them being deployed.


This week, a UN convention dedicated to this topic is bringing together delegates from 90 different member states in Geneva.


Today marks the first full day of talks in the Swiss city as the gathered experts and officials discuss 'Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems (LAWS). 


Major agenda points will be covered on different days, with 'consideration of the human element in the use of lethal force' the main talking point for Wednesday.   


Fully autonomous killer robots, similar to the Skynet organised Terminator played by Arnold Schwarzenegger (pictured) 

could be a reality within a year. Experts believe there should be 'meaningful human control' over all robots 

Currently, robotic systems can utilise AI and develop lethal machines, but they must have 'human oversight'. 


Experts stress that all robotic weapons should have a level of 'meaningful human control,' said Professor Sharkey.

'Terms like 'human oversight' can be simply pressing a button to launch a missile.


'The word "meaningful" is very important as it means someone is involved in deciding the contact and determining the target.'


This, according to Professor Sharkey, is a bone of contention between campaigners and weapons developers.

Some countries, including the US and the UK, believe that the term meaningful is open to debate and opens the field up to a level of subjectivity. 


Professor Sharkey, and many others, think that the main flaw of the killer robots is that the technology is incapable of making human-like decisions.


When it comes to life and death, this can have devastating consequences.  


WHY ARE PEOPLE SO WORRIED ABOUT AI?

It is an issue troubling some of the greatest minds in the world at the moment, from Bill Gates to Elon Musk.

SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk described AI as our 'biggest existential threat' and likened its development as 'summoning the demon'.

He believes super intelligent machines could use humans as pets.

Professor Stephen Hawking said it is a 'near certainty' that a major technological disaster will threaten humanity in the next 1,000 to 10,000 years.

They could steal jobs 

More than 60 percent of people fear that robots will lead to there being fewer jobs in the next ten years, according to a 2016 YouGov survey.

And 27 percent predict that it will decrease the number of jobs 'a lot' with previous research suggesting admin and service sector workers will be the hardest hit.

As well as posing a threat to our jobs, other experts believe AI could 'go rogue' and become too complex for scientists to understand.

A quarter of the respondents predicted robots will become part of everyday life in just 11 to 20 years, with 18 percent predicting this will happen within the next decade. 

They could 'go rogue' 

Computer scientist Professor Michael Wooldridge said AI machines could become so intricate that engineers don't fully understand how they work.

If experts don't understand how AI algorithms function, they won't be able to predict when they fail.

This means driverless cars or intelligent robots could make unpredictable 'out of character' decisions during critical moments, which could put people in danger.

For instance, the AI behind a driverless car could choose to swerve into pedestrians or crash into barriers instead of deciding to drive sensibly.

They could wipe out humanity 

Some people believe AI will wipe out humans completely.

'Eventually, I think human extinction will probably occur, and technology will likely play a part in this,' DeepMind's Shane Legg said in a recent interview.

He singled out artificial intelligence, or AI, as the 'number one risk for this century'.

Musk warned that AI poses more of a threat to humanity than North Korea.

'If you're not concerned about AI safety, you should be. Vastly more risk than North Korea,' the 46-year-old wrote on Twitter.

'Nobody likes being regulated, but everything (cars, planes, food, drugs, etc) that's a danger to the public is regulated. AI should be too.'

Musk has consistently advocated for governments and private institutions to apply regulations on AI technology.

He has argued that controls are necessary in order protect machines from advancing out of human control

Dr Noel Sharkey  told MailOnline that an international treaty banning the use of fully autonomous killer robots is 'vitally important'. This week he attends the UN conference in Geneva on Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems

Dr Noel Sharkey  told MailOnline that an international treaty banning the use of fully autonomous killer robots is 'vitally 

important'. This week he attends the UN conference in Geneva on Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems


Professor Sharkey said: 'I don't believe they can adhere to the rules of war. They can't decipher enemy from friend and they have no way of deciding a proportionate response. That is a human decision that cannot be replicated in a robot.

'For example, you can't say that the life of Osama bin laden was worth 50 old ladies, 20 children and a wheelchair, it just doesn't work that way.'    


'A human has to make these decisions, it can't be replicated by machines and that's where we think the line should be drawn.


'We are not against autonomous robots, but we believe they should not be able to choose their own targets.

'These weapons can go out on their own, find their own targets and apply deadly force.



'Selection and deciding of targets should be prohibited and that is our belief and priority,' he said.  

If a large-scale conflict was to break out before a treaty was signed, the results could be as devastating as chemical warfare.          


'Russia, for example, has already developed fully autonomous tanks that are overseen by humans,' Dr Sharkey concluded.


'The idea of Russian tanks patrolling the border does not help me sleep at night.' 



Professor Sharkey was one of 57 leading minds that signed an open-letter to a South Korean university this week in protest over their AI weaponisation programme.  


The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Kaist) is working with weapons manufacturer Hanwha Systems and this offended many academics in the field. 


Organising a global boycott of the University, the letter was penned by Professor Toby Walsh from the University of New South Wales in Sydney. 


Professor Sharkey told MailOnline: 'We were shocked by a University doing this as they are an academic institution. It was morally wrong.'


Calling it a 'Pandora's box', the experts believe AI and automated killing droids could trigger the third revolution in warfare.


Following the widespread condemnation by his peers, the President of Kaist, Shin Sung-chul, offered reassurances that Kaist is not in the process of developing Skynet-inspired droids.


Professor Sharkey (pictured, right) and many others, think that the main flaw of the killer robots is that the technology is incapable of making human-like decisions. Fears of indiscriminate killing and the risk of civilian casualties are a very real concern

Professor Sharkey (pictured, right) and many others, think that the main flaw of the killer robots is that the technology is 

incapable of making human-like decisions. Fears of indiscriminate killing and the risk of civilian casualties are a very 

real concern


He stated, quite explicitly, that the institution has no intention to develop 'lethal autonomous weapons systems or killer robots.'


'As an academic institution, we value human rights and ethical standards to a very high degree. Kaist has strived to conduct research for better serving the world.


'I reaffirm once again that Kaist will not conduct any research activities counter to human dignity including autonomous weapons lacking meaningful human control.' 


This, at least for Professor Sharkey, offered enough reassurance to end the boycott. 


He said: 'I am happy from a campaign perspective, they are not the only ones doing this as all institutions require funding. 


'I am happy with his remarks and I will not be boycotting the institution any longer.'


As for the remaining 56 signees from 30 different countries, they will need to discuss their position individually. 

In the opinion of Professor Sharkey, this is now a mere formality.  



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5582921/Fully-autonomous-killer-robots-YEAR-claims-expert.html#ixzz5CNR3LJHb 



kcontents

Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.04.09 23:33


From sex on a grave to wild orgies: Erotic exploits of a wealthy sheikh in the Ottoman Empire are revealed in a 200-year-old manuscript that could fetch £350,000 at auction




The 209-page book follows the life of a very promiscuous and wealthy Sheikh 

Eighty-five separate sex scenes include homosexual and heterosexual activity

Although the man is unknown, he documented his lifelong frivolity in the artwork

Experts expect the book to sell for around £350,000 ($500,000) this month



경매에서 35만파운드에 팔릴 수 있는 오토만제국의 

부유한 아랍 왕자의 야한 착취물들이 200년된 필사본에 

그 모습을 드러냈다


209페이지의 이책에는 성생활이 난잡한 아랍 왕자의 모습이 담겨 있다



By JOE PINKSTONE FOR MAILONLINE 

PUBLISHED: 13:02 BST, 9 April 2018 

A 200-year-old manuscript from the Ottoman empire provides an eye-opening insight into the sex life of a wealthy sheikh. 


With everything from wild orgies to sex on a tomb, the book contains 85 illustrated scenes showing vigorous sexual exploits of the 'Ottoman playboy'.


The unnamed playboy enjoys sexual relations with both men and women throughout the book. 


He always wears the same distinctive turban of dark blue fabric and white cloth, suggesting he was rich and in the Sultan's inner circle. 


The manuscript is set to go under the hammer later this month in London and could fetch as much as £350,000 ($500,000).


Scroll down for video  

A 200-year-old manuscript from the Ottoman empire provides an eye-opening insight into the frivolous activities of a wealthy sheikh. The X-rated book, the title of which loosely translates to 'A Shaykh Remembers his Youth', shows a variety of sexual scenes (pictured) in startling clarity

A 200-year-old manuscript from the Ottoman empire provides an eye-opening insight into the frivolous activities of a wealthy sheikh. The X-rated book, the title of which loosely translates to 'A Shaykh Remembers his Youth', shows a variety of sexual scenes (pictured) in startling clarity


The X-rated book, the title of which loosely translates to 'A Shaykh Remembers his Youth', shows a variety of sexual scenes in startling clarity.


Sex in the book takes place everywhere, including in a hammam, a bakery and on the site of a tomb.

With homosexual acts just as prominent as heterosexual acts, the wealthy sheikh who commissioned the piece was far from shy about sharing his antics.


The book is considered one of the most lavishly illustrated erotic manuscripts in the world.

Of the many trysts depicted in the book, one noteworthy one shows ten moustache-bearing youths wearing next to nothing having sex in a circle.


It appears the spectacular feat was nothing unusual for the young Muslims.


The book shows in fascinating detail the use of Ottoman-era sex toys in groups of women, suggesting the book's several authors and artists were open-minded about such activity. 


'This is top quality erotic illustration,' Chiara de Nicolais, Middle East specialist at Sotheby's, told The Times.


'It represents the long lifetime of an Ottoman playboy. We haven't been able to identify him, but there was a very clear code of dress in the Sultan's palace. 


'Whoever he was, he was certainly influential in the court, and very, very rich. His type of turban suggests someone who was within the inner circle of the sultan.' 


The main figure, always depicted wearing a white and blue turban, is seen in most of the book's explicit scenes.

'It's interesting because there is progression of age,' Ms de Nicolais said.  


One of the pieces of artwork shows an older sheikh with a prostitute. 

She can be seen counting coins on the floor while the sheikh is positioned behind her.


Scenes in the book include 39 full-page, 45 half-page and one double-page illustrations. With both homosexual and heterosexual sexual acts depicted, it gives an insight into the attitudes towards sex and erotica in the Ottoman empire 

Scenes in the book include 39 full-page, 45 half-page and one double-page illustrations. With both homosexual and 

heterosexual sexual acts depicted, it gives an insight into the attitudes towards sex and erotica in the Ottoman empire 


Set to go under the hammer later this month at Sotheby's in London, the journal is expected to fetch up to £350,000 ($500,000). The book is considered one of the most lavishly illustrated erotic manuscripts in the world

Set to go under the hammer later this month at Sotheby's in London, the journal is expected to fetch up to £350,000 ($500,000). The book is considered one of the most lavishly illustrated erotic manuscripts in the world


Lovingly created over several decades, the book documents the colourful sexual activity of an Islamic playboy. The promiscuous patron (pictured) expanded the manual to include further erotic works over the next 40 years

Lovingly created over several decades, the book documents the colourful sexual activity of an Islamic playboy. 

The promiscuous patron (pictured) expanded the manual to include further erotic works over the next 40 years

The promiscuous patron expanded the manual to include further erotic works over the next 40 years. 


The 209-page manuscript, which measures 13 inches by 8.5 inches (33cm by 22cm) mentions three dates: 1779, 1799-1780 and 1817.


This indicates that the production of the book spanned the duration of the curator's youth as well as later years.

Text in the book mentions reference to the city of Shumna, today Shumen, in Bulgaria. 


As well as showing the sexual prowess of a wealthy individual, the manuscript also offers an insight into the attitudes toward sexual activity in the late Ottoman empire.


The manual is in two sections - one depicting men's sexuality and the other's women. 

In stark contrast to the rest of conservative Europe, erotic literature was popular throughout the Ottoman empire.  


The 209-page manuscript, which measures 13 inches by 8.5 inches (33cm by 22cm) mentions three dates: 1779, 1799-1780 and 1817. This indicates that the production of the book spanned the duration of the curator's lifetime. It explores both male and female sexuality 

The 209-page manuscript, which measures 13 inches by 8.5 inches (33cm by 22cm) mentions three dates: 1779, 

1799-1780 and 1817. This indicates that the production of the book spanned the duration of the curator's lifetime. 

It explores both male and female sexuality 


 Eighty-five separate sex scenes include homosexual and heterosexual activity. Open-mindedness was a pre-requisite for book's several authors and artists as it shows in fascinating detail the use of Ottoman-era sex toys in groups of women

 Eighty-five separate sex scenes include homosexual and heterosexual activity. Open-mindedness was a pre-requisite 

for book's several authors and artists as it shows in fascinating detail the use of Ottoman-era sex toys in groups of women


WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE?

The Ottoman Empire originated in what is now modern-day Turkey in the late 13th century. 

At its peak it dominated much of south-east Europe and covered 2 million square miles (5.2 million square km).

During the 16th and 17th centuries, at the height of its power under the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent, the Ottoman Empire was a multinational, multilingual empire.

As well as engulfing south-east Europe, in also controlled vast swathes of land in Southeast Europe, parts of Central Europe, Western Asia, parts of Eastern Europe and the Caucasus North Africa and the Horn of Africa. 

With Constantinople as its capital and control of lands around the Mediterranean basin, the Ottoman Empire was at the centre of interactions between the west and the east for six centuries.

The empire allied with Germany in the early 20th century, hoping to escape from the diplomatic isolation which had contributed to its recent territorial losses, and thus joined World War One on the side of the Central powers.

After the allied forces defeated the Central powers in The Great War, the Turkish war of Independence in 1919-1922 saw the abolition of the Ottoman Empire.   

In the 16th century Ottoman society was generally open-minded about sex and then became more conservative in the 17th century.    


By the 18th century however, there had been a sexual renaissance and the market for erotica blossomed once more.    


In the Ottoman empire, gender was considered fluid and like many other extinct civilisations and cultures, homosexuality was commonplace. 


Although this is a rare depiction of lesbian sex in Islamic art, erotic behaviour between several men was more normal.

Experts believe the publication was probably made to be shared among friends. 


The figure pictured sitting cross-legged at the table features prominently throughout the entire book, always wearing the same distinct turban. it is believed he was the wealthy sheikh that commissioned the book

The figure pictured sitting cross-legged at the table features prominently throughout the entire book, always wearing 

the same distinct turban. it is believed he was the wealthy sheikh that commissioned the book


A shockingly candid glimpse at the frolicking of an unknown tycoon, the article is being viewed as one of the most lavishly illustrated erotic manuscripts in the world

A shockingly candid glimpse at the frolicking of an unknown tycoon, the article is being viewed as one of the most 

lavishly illustrated erotic manuscripts in the world


The open-minded approach to sex in the 16th century became increasingly conservative in the 17th century. By the 18th century however, there had been a sexual renaissance and the market for erotica blossomed once more

The open-minded approach to sex in the 16th century became increasingly conservative in the 17th century. 

By the 18th century however, there had been a sexual renaissance and the market for erotica blossomed once more

The catalogue notes state: 'To understand fully the context in which these paintings were produced, it is necessary 

to note that gender was not considered a dichotomy in Ottoman Turkey. 


'Three distinctive groups need to be identified when talking about sexuality: men, women and male youths. 


'The man is at the centre of the encounter most of the time, but there are occasions where only male youths or women are the principal protagonists. 


'There is fluidity in gender: youths will become men, and the main distinction within a sexual act lies between who is passive and who is active.'   


Auctioneers expect the publication to be the star of the show at the Arts of the Islamic World sale at Sotheby’s on April 25. 




Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5593699/200-year-old-sex-manual-Ottoman-Empire-goes-sale-350-000.html#ixzz5CBZKAvz8 
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.03.27 23:59


Interview: Expressive Paintings of Native Americans in Authentic Dress

By Kelly Richman-Abdou on March 27, 2018

 


Artist Jeremy Winborg is known for his expressive paintings that pair palette knife backdrops with lifelike subjects. Rendered in a distinctive style, these energetic portrayals feature iconography that ranges from local landscapes to religious figures. In addition to reimagining these regularly revisited themes, Winborg has recently turned his attention toward creating eye-catching Native American portraits.


Native American Portraits Native American Dress Jeremy Winborg Art


아티스트 제레미 윈보그 작품

그는 표현적인 그림으로 잘 알려져 있다.


This ongoing series of oils features portrayals of young women and girls in traditional Native American dress. While the backgrounds are composed of colorful abstractions, the subjects are painted in realistic detail that draws attention to their spirited faces and exquisite clothing.


When creating each piece, Winborg pays particular attention to the figure's regalia, conducting in-depth research to ensure that his representations are as authentic as possible. This approach has culminated in a collection of awe-inspiring paintings that “preserve a bit of history on each canvas.”


We recently had the chance to speak with Winborg about this ongoing series of oils and his celebrated practice in general. Read on to learn about the inspiration behind his signature aesthetic, choice in subject matter, diligent research methods, and more.




Native American Portraits Native American Dress Jeremy Winborg ArtAs a lifelong painter, how has your work changed over time? Have portraits always been your speciality?


My dad was an illustrator and he worked from home so I was constantly around artwork during my childhood. I painted whenever I wasn’t playing with toys or climbing trees.


I started painting seriously when I was 15 years old. I painted a large, wild acrylic of the Smithsonian castle. The state of Utah education department saw it and bought it. It ended up hanging in the Capitol Building in Washington DC for a month and every teacher in Utah was given a print of it. That was the first painting I made. It was a huge success. So, I continued to paint large, wild acrylics during my teen years.


We recently had the chance to speak with Winborg about this ongoing series of oils and his celebrated practice in general. Read on to learn about the inspiration behind his signature aesthetic, choice in subject matter, diligent research methods, and more.


Native American Portraits Native American Dress Jeremy Winborg Art

As a lifelong painter, how has your work changed over time? Have portraits always been your speciality?


My dad was an illustrator and he worked from home so I was constantly around artwork during my childhood. I painted whenever I wasn’t playing with toys or climbing trees.


I started painting seriously when I was 15 years old. I painted a large, wild acrylic of the Smithsonian castle. The state of Utah education department saw it and bought it. It ended up hanging in the Capitol Building in Washington DC for a month and every teacher in Utah was given a print of it. That was the first painting I made. It was a huge success. So, I continued to paint large, wild acrylics during my teen years.



At 22, I got married and started a family that I had to support so I began to paint what I thought people wanted. My dad had an art show in a gallery in Washington DC and the owner of that gallery told me that portraits don’t sell and that I should continue with landscapes. My landscapes were well-received and I was able to support my wife and five kids for over a decade painting local scenes in Utah and historic pieces.  I liked to paint landscapes, but wasn’t super excited about them. I really wanted to do something different, and I was drawn to portraiture.


Native American Portraits Native American Dress Jeremy Winborg Art

Your portraits feature a unique blend of realism and abstraction. How did you develop this aesthetic?


To tell you the truth, I just got super bored of creating the realistic backgrounds. I seemed to spend more time on those and stressed out about them more than the actual figures and it wasn’t fun. Now, I have fun with what I’m doing and I really enjoy it. I really love the juxtaposition of the realism with the abstraction.





In what ways do your paintings of Native Americans “preserve a bit of history?”


All of my paintings feature Native Americans wearing traditional, authentic native clothing. I do a lot of research and consult historians to make sure I get it right.


Native American Portraits Native American Dress Jeremy Winborg Art

Is it difficult to assure that the dress is as genuine as possible? What research goes into each painting?

I have a great source for the clothing. It is a couple that dedicates their whole life to the history of the American West. I consult them with any questions I have. They actually make all of their own museum-quality replica clothing. They make them the traditional ways with traditional materials; when they use a buckskin, they’ll actually tan the leather themselves. They do all their own beadwork, they use real animal sinew and shells and hooves and pelts. They do really incredible work and you can see that authenticity in my paintings.

Native American Portraits Native American Dress Jeremy Winborg ArtIn addition to Native American subjects, what else inspires your work?

I live in a really beautiful part of the country. I am close to Grand Teton Park and Yellowstone and also southern Utah and all the national parks there in the desert. I get a lot of inspiration from those scenes. Often times I’ll be driving down the road and have to pull over and photograph a house or a building or a cloud or the way the light is hitting a tree. I always have my camera with me and I’m constantly inspired by nature.

Plus, I’m always on the lookout for potential models that have a lot of character in their faces. I try not to be too awkward but, I’ve had many instances where I’ve gone up to people and said “hey, I’m an artist, would you be interested in modeling for me?”  I actually photographed an eighty-year-old man on a beach while on vacation in Hawaii. I find inspiration everywhere.

Native American Portraits Native American Dress Jeremy Winborg ArtWe look forward to seeing more of your paintings! Any upcoming plans or projects?

I will be at The Collector’s Rendezvous in Montana in May. It’s a three-day event where collectors and artists meet together for painting demos, a forum to speak with the artists, and information for collectors about auctions, buying, and collecting. They only invite four artists and I’m honored to be invited.

I also plan on continuing to paint, have art in galleries, and enter different shows throughout the nation. The best way to stay up to date is to sign up for my newsletter on my website.

Native American Portraits Native American Dress Jeremy Winborg ArtJeremy Winborg: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Jeremy Winborg.

kcontents


Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.03.25 20:44



Photographer Captures All 11 of Her Kids in One Stunning Heirloom Portrait

By Sara Barnes on March 13, 2018



Photographer Lisa Holloway is perfectly poised to capture stunning sibling photography—she has a beautiful brood of 11 children! For years, we’ve marveled over her striking portraits of her kids, each of them in the midst of a tranquil landscape and bathed in natural light.





할로웨이의 아이들

2살부터 20살까지


집안의 가보같은 사진들



Holloway’s children are often shot individually or in pairs, but for one of her latest photos, she’s combined all of them in one long black and white portrait. The image has the kids arranged, from nearly 2 years old to 20, in a single line as they all face a side-angle view. The result is what Holloway calls an heirloom portrait, which her kids can appreciate long after they’re grown.



So, how did Holloway create this photo? It’s easier than you think. “Each child was shot separately using natural window light and black fleece fabric for the backdrop,” she tells My Modern Met. “Once I had an image I liked of each of my children, I converted them to black and white and then lined them up and combined them into one image in Photoshop.” The piece is currently hanging as a 30-inch by 60-inch acrylic print in their home. “It was a fascinating experiment and such a fun way to compare different genetic traits—who has the same nose, chin, etc.”



The heirloom portrait is not only an eye-catching way to showcase the idiosyncrasies of Hollway's children, but it’s also a celebration of their entire clan. In the time since we last featured her work, Holloway has added another member to her family, Sylvie, in April 2016. Although she’s young, Sylvie has already proven herself to be a fighter; she was born with a congenital heart defect and had to endure open heart surgery at just three months old. But don't worry—Holloway says she's “doing fantastic now” and has joined the rest of her family for the photography fun.



Check out more of Holloway's sibling photography below!

Sibling Photography by Lisa Holloway

Child Photography by Lisa Holloway Sibling Photography by Lisa HollowayChild Photography by Lisa Holloway Sibling Photography by Lisa HollowaySibling Photography by Lisa HollowaySibling Photography by Lisa HollowaySibling Photography by Lisa HollowaySibling Photography by Lisa HollowayChild Photography by Lisa Holloway Child Photography by Lisa Holloway Child Photography by Lisa Holloway Sibling Photography by Lisa HollowaySibling Photography by Lisa HollowaySibling Photography by Lisa HollowaySibling Photography by Lisa Holloway

Lisa Holloway: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Lisa Holloway.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.03.24 16:47


How the Development of the Camera Changed Our World

By Jessica Stewart on March 23, 2018

 

 


These days, thanks to smartphones, almost everyone has a camera with them at any given moment. And, there is no doubt about the impact of photography on the entire world. Rewinding time, before selfies were a cultural norm, before geniuses like Cindy Sherman and Andrea Gursky elevated photography to an art form, someone had to invent this piece of technology. So, who invented the camera? And how has it evolved over time into the piece of equipment we now know? Let's take a look at how this revolutionary invention changed how we document life.



Photo: Amador Loureiro




The Pinhole Camera and Camera Obscura

Ancestors of the photographic camera, both camera obscura and the pinhole camera date to back to the ancient Greeks and Chinese. In fact, Chinese philosopher Mozi, who lived during the Han dynasty (circa 468 – circa 391 BC), was the first person to write down the principles of camera obscura. Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle also wrote his musings about the phenomenon in his book Problems, wondering why the sun appears circular even when projected through a rectangular hole.

So, what is camera obscura? This basic principle is a natural optical phenomenon where an image on one side of a wall—or screen—is projected through a hole onto a surface opposite the opening. The resulting projection is upside down. Camera obscura, a term coined in the 16th century, also refers to a box, tent, or room set up for such projections.

what is a camera obscura

An illustration of the principles of camera obscura. (Photo: Public domain via Wikimedia Commons)


The only difference between a camera obscura and a pinhole camera is that a camera obscura uses a lens, while a pinhole camera is a similar device, but with an open hole. This technology picked up steam through the 17th and 18th centuries when artists used these devices to help project drawings they could then trace. The only issue with this system is that clearly, aside from tracing, there was no way to preserve the images.

That's where the next step on the road to the modern photographic camera comes into play.

Johann Zahn, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, and the Invention of the Camera

While early camera obscura devices took up entire rooms, by the 17th-century developments lead to portable devices. Further advancements, like the invention of the magic lantern, further pushed what was possible with projection, but didn't solve the issue of capturing still images.

German author Johann Zahn, an expert on light, wrote extensively about the camera obscura, magic lantern, telescopes, and lenses. In 1685, he proposed a design for the first handheld reflex camera. Ahead of his time, it would take another 150 years before his invention became a reality.

Who Invented the Camera Joseph Nicéphore Niépce

Left: Niépce's original photo plate c. 1826 (Photo: via Wikipedia) | Right: Enhanced version by Helmut Gersheim (1913–1995), performed ca. 1952, of Niépce's View from the Window at Le Gras. (Photo: Joseph Nicéphore Niépce [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons)

French inventor Joseph Nicéphore Niépce is now widely accepted as the creator of photography as we now know it. Using a homemade camera, he produced the first partially successful photograph in 1816 on paper coated with silver chloride. Though this photograph no longer exists, letters from Niépce to his sister give evidence of a successful photograph. The first surviving photograph is also by Niépce and is now in the permanent collection of the University of Texas-Austin. It dates to 1826 or 1827 and is a scene from his window in Burgundy. All this makes Niépce widely accepted as the inventor of the first functional camera.

Using a technique he called heliography, the French inventor was able to produce one-of-a-kind images that could not be replicated. Heliography calls for a glass or metal surface to be coated in Bitumen of Judea. This naturally occurring asphalt would harden in the brightest areas, while the unhardened bitumen would be washed away, leaving behind the photographic imprint. This is still a long way off from photography as we now think of it, but was a revolutionary step towards permanent replicable photographs.


Keep reading to see how cameras developed, leading to negatives and the invention of film photography.

history of photography Daguerreotype Camera

Daguerreotype camera from 1839. (Photo: Liudmila & Nelson [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons)


Louis Daguerre and Daguerreotype

In 1829, Niépce joined forces with Louis Daguerre, a French artist and photographer. Together they continued to experiment and refine the process for taking photographs. Several days of exposure were needed to develop Niépce's bitumen-soaked plates. Surely there had to be a better way. After Niécpe's death in 1833, Daguerre continued to hone his process and eventually developed the daguerreotype.

Carrying his name, it would be the most commonly used photographic method for the next twenty years. The process was introduced publicly in 1839 and called for a sheet of silver-plated copper to be polished to a mirror surface. The plate would be treated with iodine vapor to make it light sensitive and after exposure in the camera, would be exposed to mercury vapor and fixed with sodium chloride. Using this method, Daguerre was responsible for taking the first photograph to include human beings.

Daguerre's methodology spread rapidly and by 1840, Alexander Wolcott was issued the first American patent in photography for his daguerreotype camera. Still, the process was expensive, limiting photography to professionals and make a photograph a precious one of a kind keepsake for an elite few.

history of photography calotype

Left: Latticed window at Lacock Abbey, August 1835. A positive from what may be the oldest existing camera negative. (Photo: William Fox Talbot (1800-1877) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons) | Left: A salted paper calotype photograph of Scottish amateur golfer, golf administrator, and aristocrat James Ogilvie Fairlie, c. 1846-49 (Photo: Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons)


The Invention of the Photo Negative

To this point, photographs were still one-off items, printed originals that could not be reproduced. This all changed thanks to William Henry Fox Talbot. Scientist and inventor, the Brit developed light-sensitive paper and a process known as calotype, which would lay the foundation of photography up to the digital age.

Around the same time that Daguerre was perfecting his process, Fox Talbot had a different method for quick and accessible photographs. It started with his “salted paper,” where he soaked ordinary writing paper in a weak solution of ordinary table salt. Then, by brushing one side with a silver nitrate solution, he effectively produced a light-sensitive paper that could be used for photograms or capturing images from the lens of a camera. Though it still took a few hours of exposure to produce a legible image, the inventor was able to come up with a method to fix the photo print. This was a huge step that hadn't previously been accomplished and allowed copies of the photo to be printed from simply placing new light-sensitive paper against the fixed photograph—or negative.

By late 1840, Fox Talbot revealed his calotype process for developing photographs. With calotype, a latent image could be produced with just a few minutes of exposure if done in bright sunlight. This was a giant leap forward, as calotype also produced a negative that allowed for multiple replicas through contact printing—a true revolution in photography.

Mount Savage, Maryland Photographer

the invention of Kodak

Frances Benjamin Johnston with a group of children looking at her Kodak camera, 1890. (Photo: Library of Congress)

George Eastman, Kodak, and Cameras for Consumers

If we want to look at how photographic cameras came into the hands of the public at large, it's impossible not to speak about George Eastman. In 1888, the photographer introduced the first Kodak Black camera, which benefitted from advances in technology. By this time, gelatin plates, which developed quickly, meant that people did not need a tripod for their cameras, and thus the first handheld cameras started being sold.


As opposed to other cameras, Eastman's Kodak was genius in its use of flexible film instead of the glass plates that were the norm. Rid of bulky plates, the Kodak was truly portable. Easy to use, it helped move photography from a strictly a profession to a hobby that amateurs could also enjoy. Kodak Black cameras were sold with the film already inside, and photographers simply mailed the entire camera to the Kodak headquarters in Rochester, New York to have their pictures developed and mailed back.

Who created Kodak cameras

Kodak Brownie 2 camera. (Photo: Håkan Svensson via WikiCommons)

Kodak's beloved Brownie was introduced just two years after the original camera Eastman produced. Now, instead of coming preloaded, the Brownie came with a removable film container. Less expensive than the Kodak Black, coupled with the plus of not having to ship the entire camera to get your photos back, the Brownie caused a sensation and helped popularize amateur photography.

From the mid-19th century onwards, photo technology rapidly developed, as inventors pushed the envelop for how to take still images. From the early-20th century, things reached a peak, with the development of the compact camera through our current digital DSRLs. From glass plates to paper prints to digital imaging, the photo revolution's intention remains the same—to immortalize our world.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.03.14 17:08


A 19th century engraving of Casanova and one of his conquests. 


12 MARCH 2018 • 3:10PM

Nick Squires, rome 



He was the ultimate rake, the personification of the art of seduction. Now a museum is to be dedicated to the life of Casanova.



A 19th century engraving of Casanova and one of his conquests. CREDIT: GETTY



The “Casanova Museum and Experience”, which is billed as the first of its kind in the world, will open next month in his hometown of Venice.



The museum will recount not only his louche sexual conquests, which numbered around 120 if Casanova’s claims are to be believed, but his encounters with some of the best-known figures of his time, from Mozart and Voltaire to Benjamin Franklin and Madame de Pompadour, mistress to King Louis XV of France.



The opening of the museum on April 2, in Venice’s Palazzo Pesaro Papafava, not far from the Grand Canal, comes 220 years after the libertine’s death in 1798.





There will be six rooms dedicated to the adventurer, who was also a soldier, spy, linguist, philosopher and poet.



It is Casanova’s sexual conquests which garner the most attention – but he was much more than an arch seducer.



“Casanova might be surprised by his reputation in the modern world because he was a fiercely proud intellectual and polymath,” said Ian Kelly, a British historian and the author of “Casanova – Actor, Lover, Priest, Spy”, an acclaimed biography.



“He was a very skilled mathematician and he wrote something like 42 books, including a history of Poland and arguably the world’s first-ever science fiction novel.”



Casanova had a reputation as a seducer but he was also a poet, philosopher, soldier and spy. 

CREDIT: GETTY



Casanova worked variously as a scribe to a cardinal, a violinist and a professional gambler, before securing the patronage of a Venetian nobleman.



“He was from the wrong side of the tracks but rose fast in Venetian society.



“He escaped from the Doge’s prison in Venice after being hauled up for his interest in the Kabbalah and Jewish mysticism,” said Mr Kelly.





“He was a genius, in a way, but he was also febrile and restive and could never settle down to one thing.”

Born in Venice in 1725, as a young man Casanova was expelled from a seminary for scandalous behaviour.



He embarked on a life of scandal, intrigue and regular bouts of venereal disease.



“I often had no scruples about deceiving nitwits and scoundrels and fools when I found it necessary. We avenge intelligence when we deceive a fool,” he wrote.



Traveling restlessly from one European country to another, he is thought to have covered more than 40,000 miles during his lifetime and met two popes as well as Rousseau and Catherine the Great.



After returning to Venice, he acted as a spy for the Venetian Inquisition, before spending his final years as a librarian in a castle in Bohemia, in what is today the Czech Republic.



“By that stage of his life he was cursed by depression and loneliness and his doctor suggested that he write his memoirs as a cure for his melancholia,” said Mr Kelly, whose biography of Casanova was last year turned into a ballet.



The 12-volume autobiography, Story of My Life, was only published after his death. 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/03/12/worlds-first-museum-dedicated-casanova-open-venice



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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.03.08 11:08


Lacoste Replaces Iconic Crocodile Logo With 10 Endangered Species

By Emma Taggart on March 7, 2018

 

 

In an effort to raise awareness for endangered species, sports fashion brand Lacoste has replaced its iconic crocodile logo with 10 different animals, which represent species that are sadly facing extinction. Featured on the brand’s classic white polo, the limited edition collection—titled Save Our Species—marks a three-year partnership between Lacoste and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).



“For the endangered species of this world, the crocodile abandons its ancestral place,” say Lacoste, who had previously never changed their green croc since its debut 85 years ago. The globally recognized logo was designed as an homage to the brand’s founder René Lacoste, who was dubbed “The Crocodile” because of how he dealt with his opponents on the tennis court. The new, limited edition logos were produced using the same green coloring and embroidery style as the crocodile.


Each of the 10 designs were produced in limited numbers, corresponding to the remaining population size of each species in the wild. For example, just 350 polos were produced featuring the Sumatran Tiger, whose main threats are poaching and deforestation. The smallest batch—at just 30 pieces—features the California porpoise, who due to overfishing is one of the most threatened mammal species ever. Other species include the Burmese turtle, the northern weasel maki, the Java rhino, the eastern black crested gibbon, the kakapo, the California condor, the saola, and the Anegada iguana.




Each Save Our Species polo was retailed at $185, and the total collection of 1,775 are already sold out, with the profits of each sale donated to the IUCN conservation. However, If you’d still like to contribute to the worthy cause, you can still donate via the Save Our Species website.


In an effort to raise awareness for endangered species, sports fashion brand Lacoste has replaced its iconic crocodile logo with 10 different animals, which represent species that are sadly facing extinction.

Lacoste Endangered Species Polos

Featured on the brand’s classic white polo, the limited edition collection—titled Save Our Species—marks a three-year partnership between Lacoste and the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Lacoste Endangered Species Polos

Each of the 10 designs were produced in limited numbers, corresponding to the remaining population size of each species in the wild.

Lacoste Endangered Species PolosLacoste Endangered Species PolosLacoste Endangered Species PolosLacoste Endangered Species PolosLacoste Endangered Species PolosLacoste Endangered Species PolosLacoste Endangered Species PolosLacoste Endangered Species PolosLacoste Endangered Species PolosLacoste Endangered Species PolosLacoste Endangered Species Polos

Lacoste: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest
Save Our Species: Website | Facebook | Twitter
h/t: [Ad Week]

All images via Lacoste.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.03.07 11:51


Microgreens: All You Ever  Wanted to Know, Plus How to Grow Them


Since their introduction to the Californian restaurant scene in the 1980s, microgreens have steadily gained popularity.


These aromatic greens, also known as micro herbs or vegetable confetti, are rich in flavor and add a welcome splash of color to a variety of dishes.


Despite their small size, they pack a nutritional punch, often containing higher nutrient levels than more mature vegetable greens. This makes them a good addition to any diet.






마이크로그린스 (microgreens)

분홍빛 LED 전구 아래에 놓인 수경재배 틀에서 재배되는 독특하고 강한 풍미를 가진 소형 허브작물



This article reviews the potential health benefits of microgreens and provides a step-by-step guide on how to grow your own.


What Are Microgreens?

Microgreens are young vegetable greens that are approximately 1–3 inches (2.5–7.5 cm) tall.


They have an aromatic flavor and concentrated nutrient content and come in a variety of colors and textures (1).


Microgreens are considered baby plants, falling somewhere between a sprout and baby green.


That said, they shouldn’t be confused with sprouts, which do not have leaves. Sprouts also have a much shorter growing cycle of 2–7 days, whereas microgreens are usually harvested 7–21 days after germination, once the plant’s first true leaves have emerged.


Microgreens are more similar to baby greens in that only their stems and leaves are considered edible. However, unlike baby greens, they are much smaller in size and can be sold before being harvested.


This means that the plants can be bought whole and cut at home, keeping them alive until they are consumed.


Microgreens are very convenient to grow, as they can be grown in a variety of locations, including outdoors, in greenhouses and even on your windowsill.


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https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/microgreens?utm_source=notification&utm_medium=standard

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.03.07 11:20


Portraits of “Most Beautiful Chickens on the Planet” Capture Their Underrated Beauty

By Emma Taggart on March 6, 2018



If you were asked to name the most beautiful species of bird in the world, it’s unlikely that “chicken” would be your first answer. However, Italian photographers Moreno Monti and Matteo Tranchellini believe chickens are underrated. The two began a portrait project called Chic!ken to show the world just how beautiful these humble farm birds really are. Today, with over 200 stunning portraits showcasing 100 different types of chickens, the pair decided to combine the collection into a hardback photobook.





지구상에서 가장 아름다운 닭들



Tranchellini first became aware of how chic a chicken could be in 2013 while in search of a pet Concincina for his studio garden in Milan. After meeting a farmer named Giorgio who invited him to an aviary exhibition, he fell in love with the beautiful birds and met his Concincina hen, Jessicah. Teaming up with fellow photographer Monti, the pair then began shooting various honorable hens and remarkable roosters at bird shows. “We felt like chickens had been waiting for their moment in the spotlight,” the duo explain on their Kickstarter campaign.



And for concerned animal lovers, the photographers reassure: “None of these beauties were harmed, forced, or leashed.” The collection of “natural born posers” showcases the surprising diversity of chickens. The magnificent models include Martha, the Frizzle Bantam, who shakes her copper-colored plumage at the camera. Another stand-out star is a fabulously fluffy Silkie chicken named Agnes. When recalling their time on shoot, the pair reveal, “They were just themselves and had a natural ability to move in front of the camera. Some of them were photographed from the side, from behind, or with only a glance over the shoulder. A NATURAL TALENT.”


Monti and Tranchellini are currently running a campaign on Kickstarter, where you can pre-order Chicken: The Book, featuring “the sexiest and most beautiful chickens on the planet.” Other pledger rewards include limited edition fine art prints, hilarious posters, chicken postcards, collectible journals, and “a sexy calendar for adults only.”


Italian photographers Moreno Monti and Matteo Tranchellini believe chickens are underrated, and so began the Chic!ken project to show the world how beautiful these farm birds really are.


Photobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!ken

Photobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!ken

The “natural born posers” include some of the most honorable hens and remarkable roosters in the world.

Photobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!ken

With over 200 stunning chicken portraits, the pair decided to combine the collection into a hardback photobook.

Photobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!ken

 

Photobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!ken

You can support the project on Kickstarter.

Photobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!kenPhotobook Different Types of Chickens by Chic!ken

Chic!ken: Instagram | Kickstarter

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Chic!ken.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.03.07 01:37


Scientists Discover Satisfying Sounds of an 800,000-Year-Old Antarctic Glacier


By Emma Taggart on March 5, 2018



Photo: University of Rochester Ice Core Expedition Blog

A group of University of Rochester scientists are currently studying the effects of global warming by drilling ice cores from 800,000-year-old Antarctic ice. Over time, layers of snow can compact under their own weight, forming strata that encapsulate past climates.“We use ancient air trapped in glacial ice from Greenland and Antarctica to learn about how the concentrations and isotopic composition of greenhouse gases and reactive gases have varied in the past, and what these changes tell us about Earth’s climate and atmospheric chemistry,” explains the University of Rochester Ice Core Lab.

Although the team is carrying out important research, the group still makes sure to have a little fun every once in a while. After the hard labor of making the boreholes, some of the scientists decided to see what would happen if they dropped chunks of ice into the abyss. Little did they know that their spontaneous playtime would lead to a serendipitous discovery: super cool noises. One of the scientists on the expedition—Dr. Peter Neff, a postdoctoral researcher—shared their fun discovery on Twitter saying, “When science is done, it's fun to drop ice down a 90 m deep borehole in an Antarctic glacier. So satisfying when it hits the bottom.” Taking around 5-10 seconds for the block of ice to reach the base, the videos record a spectacular “pew” sound, along with giggles of glee from onlookers.

You can follow the group’s adventures and progress via their expedition blog.

https://mymodernmet.com/global-warming-ice-cores-sound

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.02.28 03:18


Woman Creates Exquisite “Wearable Storybook” Dress Inspired by a French Town

By Kelly Richman-Abdou on February 27, 2018



Pairing an admiration for haute couture with an appreciation for the Hauts-de-France, French fashion designer Sylvie Facon has created Hommage à Arras (“Homage to Arras”), an exquisite evening gown that pays tribute to the historic town. Featuring everything from intricate illustrations to “iridescent lace and pearls,” the dress puts a storybook spin on French fashion.



At first glance, the fanciful frock looks like a fantastical work of fiction. However, look closely, and you'll discover it actually features factual depictions of Arras' artistic and architectural treasures.


On the bust, you'll find the Flemish-inspired façades that line its Baroque town square. The Angels of Saudemont, a series of gilded Medieval statues, are perched on the hips, while the Lion of Arras, a symbolic sculpture from the town's belfry, are situated on the shoulders. In addition to these specific landmarks and recognizable sites, the gown also incorporates the little details that make Arras so special, from its pavement to its plants.


Aiming to “master all stages, from the sketch to the last point,” Facon creates dresses that combine fine art with tailor-made fashion. Like Hommage à Arras, her other dresses double as storytellers, showcasing the bountiful beauty of ordinary objects and everyday sights.


Inspired by the charming architecture of Arras, France, Sylvie Facon has designed an intricate dress that looks like a storybook.





Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.02.28 02:29


Paris Couture Week 2018: Lessons In Female Empowerment



This Paris Haute Couture season, designs on female power ushered in a new era on aesthetic refinement and fury, writes Rebecca Anne Proctor


A woman in a bright orange dress rolls down the aisle of the American Church in Paris. As she dances in front of intrigued onlookers—writhing her body and swaying her arms with passion—an older woman with grey hair taps her gently as if empathising with her dramatic movements—her agony and sorrow. She then too proceeds down the length of the church with her head high and lifts her arms up as if in victory. The dancer is the famed ballerina Marie-Agnès Gillot who is to retire from the Paris Opera this year and the older woman is the renowned French writer Sophie Fontanel and the show, none other than that of Lebanese maestro Rabih Kayrouz for his Fall 2018 ready-to-wear collection. The designer’s presentation, revealed through long unicolour coats flowing around the body, smooth planes, fancy brocades and avant-garde cuts, portrayed the powerful, determined female and her je ne sais quoi attitude that is all the rage these days.


Rabih Kayrouz & Marie-Agnes Gillot walk down the American Church in Paris


Just as the lavish ceremonial three-day marathon of Paris Haute Couture week began thousands of women descended on New York to participate in the 2018 Women’s March. While many chants and songs were lifted from last year’s historic demonstration, this year’s organisers created a new banner called “Power to the Polls” that aims to elect more women and candidates worldwide. Just a few weeks prior, Catherine Deneuve and Catherine Millet, alongside more than 100 women, penned an open letter in Le Monde suggesting that the #MeToo movement had gone too far. Women also took centre stage at the 24th Screen Actors Guild awards Power with all-female cast of presenters. Empowerment is certainly the name of the game and designers undoubtedly had this in mind as they crafted the intricate garments presented at the most lavish fashion shows of the season.


View Full Text

https://www.harpersbazaararabia.com/art/fairs-and-events/paris-fashion-week-2018-review

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.02.24 12:29


Mysterious Spiral Found in the Tail of Human Sperm

By Laura Geggel, Senior Writer | February 21, 2018




Researchers have uncovered a previously unknown spiral-shaped nanostructure 

in human sperm tails.

Credit: University of Gothenburg



과학자들은 남자의 정자의 꼬리에서 신비에 싸인 

나선형태의 나노구조를 발견했다고 발표했다.



Scientists have spent decades studying the extraordinary abilities and anatomy of human sperm, so an international team of researchers was surprised to discover a mysterious, spiral-shaped nanostructure in the tails of sperm.


The newfound spiral may give sperm tails a boost, the scientists said.


Sperm need a highly effective tail so they can swim as fast as possible toward the egg and attempt to fertilize it. Each sperm tail has thousands of building blocks, the most important of which are called tubulins, the researchers said. These tubulins form long tubes known as microtubules in the sperm's tail. 




These microtubules are attached to thousands of motor proteins (proteins that can move) that pull and bend the microtubules, allowing the sperm to swim.


"It's actually quite incredible that it can work," study senior researcher Johanna Höög, a researcher in the Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Gothenburg, in Sweden, said in a statement. "The movement of thousands of motor proteins has to be coordinated in the minutest of detail in order for the sperm to be able to swim."


To get a better look at the sperm tail, Höög and her colleagues imaged sperm specimens with a Nobel Prize-winning microscope technique known as cryo-electron tomography, or cryo-ET. This method allows researchers to freeze tiny structures, such as sperm, and take a series of 2D pictures that can then be combined to make an incredibly detailed 3D image. Moreover, this method doesn't require any chemicals, which would obscure the smallest cell structures, Höög said.


"When we looked at the first 3D images of the very end section of a sperm tail, we spotted something we had never seen before inside the microtubules: [a] spiral that stretched in from the tip of the sperm and was about a tenth of the length of the tail," Höög said.


Researchers found the mysterious structure in the sperm tails by using 

cryo-electron tomography.

Credit: University of Gothenburg


The researchers named the helical structure a "tail axoneme intra-lumenal spiral," or TAILS. It's still unclear exactly what TAILS does, what it's made out of and how important it is, they said. But the researchers have a few ideas they plan to study further, said lead researcher Davide Zabeo, a doctoral student in the Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Gothenburg.


"We believe that this spiral may act as a cork inside the microtubules, preventing them from growing and shrinking as they would normally do, and instead allowing the sperm's energy to be fully focused on swimming quickly towards the egg," Zabeo said in the statement.


Despite the surprise surrounding this finding, it's not the only recent sperm discovery. Just last year, researchers found that human sperm cells get an extra oomph when they swim, largely because of interconnected elastic springs in their tails that communicate with other regions of the tail, Live Science previously reported.

https://www.livescience.com/61826-newfound-spiral-found-in-sperm-tails.html?utm_source=notification

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.02.20 17:55


Spring 2018 Fashion Trends from New York Fashion Week: Americana



The Biggest Spring 2018 Fashion Trends From the Designer Runways



Raf Simons spoke about the American dream again for spring, which he depicted his own particular way; while Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia’s was a cheerful, spirited rally with tons of stripes and stars in between from Self-Portrait, Phillip Lim and Maria Cornejo. Pictured: Calvin Klein, Monse, Zero + Maria Cornejo, 3.1 Phillip Lim


View Full Text

http://wwd.com/fashion-news/fashion-features/gallery/the-5-biggest-spring-2018-fashion-trends-from-new-york-fashion-week-10989352

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people2018.02.15 00:57


Fixed wing drone


Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.02.10 23:15


Feel 'True Love': Husky Cafe Discovered in Bangkok


14:53 10.02.2018


If you have ever wondered how a dog lover's paradise would look, you should go straight to the True Love Cafe in Bangkok, where you will have an unforgettable experience with huskies, one of the friendliest dogs in the world.




The entrance fee, which is 350 Baht ($11), includes a free drink and a cake and gives visitors the opportunity to enjoy an hour of playtime with huskies. There are three play timings a day, when visitors are allowed to enter the area with dogs and do what people usually do when meet friendly fluffy animals:pet them, hug them and feed them. Hygiene standards are very much respected at True Love, as visitors have to wear special plastic shoe covers and use hand sanitizers before entering the play zone.

https://sputniknews.com/videoclub/201802101061538373-true-love-cafe-bangkok-husky





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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.02.10 23:10


New York fashion week: industry faces its #MeToo moment

The hotly debated issue will not be hemlines but whether fashion is truly addressing its problems

Jess Cartner-Morley  @JessC_M

Sat 10 Feb 2018 


The most public moment in the fashion industry calendar has arrived at a moment when the industry is in turmoil. The Bottega Veneta catwalk show, held at the American Stock Exchange on Friday night, opened New York fashion week just three weeks after Mario Testino and Bruce Weber, two of the most powerful photographers in the American fashion industry and front row regulars, faced multiple allegations of sexual misconduct, which they have denied. The most hotly debated issues of this week will not be hemlines, but whether an industry facing its own #MeToo moment can retain its dignity in the oversexed and underdressed environment of fashion week.


The Tom Ford show at New York fashion week. Photograph: NameFa/Sipa USA/Rex/Shutterstock


The blackout on the Golden Globes red carpet, when actresses wore black as a statement of feminist solidarity, proved the power of fashion as a lever to engineer change. Last week it was announced that the Baftas, which will be held during London fashion week, would have the same dress code. Yet internally, the fashion industry is proving slow to embrace the collective mood of reflection and re-evaluation that the red carpet blackouts signify in the film community. While Condé Nast International and major brands have cut ties with the named photographers for the foreseeable future, a root-and-branch overhaul of an industry that the Vogue cover girl Edie Campbell described in an open letter to Womenswear Daily as “too accepting of abuse in all its manifestations” has not been instigated. “The ritual humiliation of models, belittling of assistants, power plays and screaming fits … we have come to see this as part of the job,” wrote Campbell.


The activist Myriam Chalek is one of those using the spotlight of fashion week to fight complacency in the industry. Her event, the Time’s Up Show, is a catwalk show that doubles as a protest, with models sharing their experiences of sexual harassment. Chalek told the Daily Beast she chose a fashion show format for the event because “many times [women] get blamed for what happened to them. There is a strong connection between the clothes that somebody is wearing and the blame that society puts on the victims.” The Council of Fashion Designers of America has moved to address an issue that has long affronted models’ dignity. For the first time, models will be entitled to private changing areas backstage, a departure from an industry-wide norm in which models are required to change out of their catwalk outfits and into their own clothes in the same backstage area used by designers as a post-event meet-and-greet area and for media interviews. The CFDA has partnered with the advocacy group Model Alliance to provide working models with a respectful and safe working environment.


Prabal Gurung’s past shows have pioneered casting diversity in ethnicity and body size, championed feminist causes and served as fundraising launches for humanitarian relief after the 2015 Nepal earthquake. “Fashion is not the land of the stupids,” Gurung recently told the Washington Post. Gurung sees his New York fashion week show, which last season drew the activist Gloria Steinem to the front row – her first catwalk show, at the age of 83 – as “a platform, a way to speak to issues that are important to me”.


Gurung, 38, who was born in Singapore and has helmed a fashion brand in New York for almost a decade, represents a world that is no longer about hemlines. Fashion week has shapeshifted from a business-to-business model for designers and retailers into a platform for politics, popular culture and protest – the publicity from which, almost as an afterthought, helps shift clothes. Tuesday’s Black Panther show will be the first official fashion week collection to be presented under the name of a Hollywood film rather than a designer or fashion brand. It features clothes inspired by the afrofuturistic world of Marvel’s first black superhero movie from a stable of designers including Ikiré Jones, who told Womenswear Daily that the film was “an attempt to help uplift the voices of people who have been marginalised historically … It’s beautiful aesthetics but it’s a way to talk about the refugee crises, globalisation, ethical labour.”


Gabriela Hearst, whose show will be held in SoHo early next week, told Vogue the new collection was based on the masculine clothes women wore as they entered the workforce in the second world war. “The #MeToo and #TimesUp movements are addressing something that is so ingrained in our society and is especially vital in its workforce. I don’t know any industry, nation or society that hasn’t been affected by gender inequality or abuse.’


The most-anticipated front row moment will come at Calvin Klein. Under Raf Simons, a name that once embodied a milk-fed version of American sex appeal has become a fashion week lightning rod for the liberal, progressive, arthouse leanings of Manhattan. September’s sophomore show, which he dubbed “American horror meets American beauty”, held up a black mirror to the fractious issue of American identity, with reference to Twin Peaks and cowboys, cheerleaders and Andy Warhol. To the rollcall of A-list friends of the house – Gwyneth Paltrow, Brooke Shields and Paris Jackson, daughter of Michael, all take their front row seats – the Kardashian family, who star en masse in the latest advertising campaign, may be added.


The transfer of Bottega Veneta, an insider-favourite name from Milan, to New York this season has softened the blow of losing Proenza Schouler to Paris, but the absence of Rodarte and Altuzarra are keenly felt. Rihanna, whose Fenty show was the out-of-the-box hit of last New York fashion week, is not showing this week. Household names such as Ralph Lauren, Michael Kors, Coach and Oscar de la Renta can be relied upon to provide catwalk glamour. But with Victoria Beckham moving her show to London next season and Alexander Wang’s show on Saturday night his last before he moves his events to an off-season calendar, the trajectory of once mighty New York fashion week is looking less than positive. Georgina Chapman, whose divorce from Harvey Weinstein has been set in motion, last week quietly cancelled the Marchesa show.

https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2018/feb/10/new-york-fashion-week-industry-faces-metoo-moment


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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.02.07 18:07


Laser Mapping Unearths 60,000 Ancient Maya Structures in Guatemalan Jungle

By Jessica Stewart on February 5, 2018




Peten jungle, Guatemala – Before. Tikal site, trees (Photo: Wild Blue Media)



The ancient Maya civilization has remained a mystery for centuries, hampered by the thick Central American jungle that has made excavations difficult. But now, a group of scientists has come together and, using cutting-edge technology, they've been able to identify more than 60,000 previously unknown Maya structures. This breakthrough discovery changes everything archeologists previously thought about this ancient culture.


Using laser technology called LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging), almost 800 square miles of Guatemalan forest were surveyed by plane. Organized by the non-profit PACUNAM, the technology allows researchers to see below the thick canopy of trees in order to reveal interconnected Maya cities that were far more expansive than the isolated settlements the Maya were previously thought to have inhabited.




And what's more, the expansive cities revealed by the survey could have held upwards of 20 million inhabitants—an incredible jump from the previously estimated 1 to 2 million. This would put the Maya on the level of the ancient Egyptian or ancient Chinese civilizations, not only in terms of population, but sophistication.


“There are entire cities we didn’t know about now showing up in the survey data,” says archaeologist Francisco Estrada-Belli, who is co-leading the initiative. “There are 20,000 square kilometers [7,700 square miles] more to be explored and there are going to be hundreds of cities in there that we don’t know about. I guarantee you.”



Maya Civilization Laser Mapping

Maya Civilization Laser Mapping

Peten jungle, Guatemala – After. Tikal site, LiDAR (Photo: Wild Blue Media)


LiDAR data not only shows that the Maya were living in interconnected cities, but that they built vast elevated highways, fortifications, and farms. In fact, it appears that they managed the landscape in such a way that they would have been able to produce food on an almost industrial scale.


“We’ve had this western conceit that complex civilizations can’t flourish in the tropics, that the tropics are where civilizations go to die,” shared Marcello Canuto, an archeologist from Tulane University who worked on the project. “But with the new LiDAR-based evidence from Central America and [Cambodia’s] Angkor Wat, we now have to consider that complex societies may have formed in the tropics and made their way outward from there.”


Scientists are just getting started, with plenty of data to pour through and new areas to survey, they've just scratched the surface in rewriting our history of the Maya. In fact, this is just the first stage of PACUNAM's three-year initiative to survey more than 5,000 square miles of the Guatemalan lowlands. Learn more about the discovery, and the civilizations uncovered in the documentary, Lost Treasures of the Maya Snake Kings, which premieres on February 6, 2018, at 9 pm EST on National Geographic.


Using laser technology, archeologists were able to digitally cut away the dense Guatemalan forest in order to see more than 60,000 unknown Maya structures.


Maya Civilization Laser Mapping LiDAR

White Boxes showing some of the 60K new structures LiDAR has revealed (Photo: Wild Blue Media)


LiDAR also helped researchers discover the existence of a large, previously unknown pyramid at the center of Tikal, an important Maya city that is now a popular tourist destination.


Maya Civilization Laser Mapping

Peten jungle, Guatemala – Before, Alberts pyramid find (Wild Blue Media)

Maya Civilization Laser Mapping

Peten jungle, Guatemala – Mid, Alberts pyramid find. LiDAR (Wild Blue Media)

Maya Civilization Laser Mapping

Peten jungle, Guatemala – After, Alberts pyramid find. LiDAR (Wild Blue Media)

Maya Civilization Laser Mapping

Tikal National Park, Guatemala (Photo: Wild Blue Media/National Geographic)

My Modern Met granted permission to use images by National Geographic.

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Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.01.25 01:38



Posted by 지구와 사람 engi-
people2018.01.22 17:11


One of the best feelings


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